Sram Debuts Trick Pindome Cassette For X, Pindome

SRAM debuts trick PinDome cassette for X.0 family

SRAM's new X.0 'family' will include a previously unannounced surprise: the clever XG-1080 'PinDome' cassette that mimics XX's incredibly light and trick X-Dome machined construction but at a far lower price point.

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Like XX, the XG-1080 cassette uses a skeletonized dome-like construction but instead of being milled from a single chunk of chromoly steel (a precise but very expensive process), each cog is individually stamped in conventional fashion then pressed together with its adjacent neighbors with a varying number of short high-strength steel pins.

As a result, XG-1080 is still impressively light with a target weight of just 235g – just 11g more than Shimano XTR, which currently has one fewer cog and uses lighter but faster-wearing titanium. More critically, though, each cog is fully supported around its full circumference, reducing cog flex to virtually nil for faster and more reliable shifting and virtually eliminating the possibility of bent gears.

Like XX, torque is transferred to the freehub body via an aluminum innermost cog and the smallest cog will remain a separate bit. Planned gear ratios include 11-32T and 11-36T options.

Consumers won't be able to buy an XG-1080 cassette until around August but once they're available, pricing will be quite reasonable all things considered: just US$200 as compared to the only marginally lighter XX, which goes for nearly US$350. In addition, XG-1080's stamped cogs are expected to run more quietly, too.

Carbacot Side Effects In Detail, Carbacot

Carbacot Side Effects

Applies to methocarbamol: oral tablet

Other dosage forms:

In addition to its needed effects, some unwanted effects may be caused by methocarbamol (the active ingredient contained in Carbacot). In the event that any of these side effects do occur, they may require medical attention.

Major Side Effects

You should check with your doctor immediately if any of these side effects occur when taking methocarbamol:

Incidence not known:

Abdominal or stomach pain

black, tarry stools

changes in skin color

chest pain or discomfort

chills

clay-colored stools

cough

dark urine

diarrhea

difficulty swallowing

dizziness

fast heartbeat

feeling of warmth

fever

headache

hives

itching

joint or muscle pain

large, hive-like swelling on face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or sex organs

lightheadedness, dizziness, or fainting

loss of appetite

loss of bladder control

loss of consciousness

loss of memory

nausea

numbness or tingling of face, hands, or feet

pain, tenderness, or swelling of foot or leg

painful or difficult urination

problems with memory

puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue

redness and soreness of eyes

redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest

relaxed and calm

shortness of breath

skin rash

sleepiness

slow or irregular heartbeat

sore throat

sores, ulcers, or white spots on lips or in mouth

swollen glands

tightness in chest

total body jerking

unpleasant breath odor

unusual bleeding or bruising

unusual tiredness or weakness

vomiting of blood

wheezing

yellow eyes or skin

If any of the following symptoms of overdose occur while taking methocarbamol, get emergency help immediately:

Symptoms of overdose:

Shaking or jerking of one area or side of the body

sweating

Minor Side Effects

Some of the side effects that can occur with methocarbamol may not need medical attention. As your body adjusts to the medicine during treatment these side effects may go away. Your health care professional may also be able to tell you about ways to reduce or prevent some of these side effects. If any of the following side effects continue, are bothersome or if you have any questions about them, check with your health care professional:

Incidence not known:

Acid or sour stomach

belching

double vision

drowsiness

feeling of constant movement of self or surroundings

heartburn

indigestion

mood or mental changes

seeing double

sensation of spinning

sleeplessness

stomach discomfort, upset, or pain

trouble sleeping

unable to sleep

uncontrolled eye movements

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to methocarbamol: injectable solution, oral tablet

Cardiovascular

Cardiovascular side effects have included syncope, hypotension, and bradycardia. [Ref ]

Nervous system

Nervous system side effects have included dizziness, lightheadedness, vertigo, headache, drowsiness, fainting, and mild muscular incoordination. Convulsions have been reported with intravenous administration, especially in patients with a history of epilepsy. [Ref ]

Dermatologic

Dermatologic side effects have included urticaria, pruritus, rash, sloughing, thrombophlebitis, and pain at the injection site. [Ref ]

Ocular

Ocular side effects have included blurred vision, conjunctivitis, nystagmus, and diplopia. [Ref ]

Respiratory

Respiratory side effects have included nasal congestion, bronchospasm, and anaphylaxis. [Ref ]

Gastrointestinal

Gastrointestinal side effects have included gastrointestinal upset, anorexia, and adynamic ileus. [Ref ]

Other

Other side effects have included metallic taste and fever.

Effects on lab tests have included a possible color interference in certain screening tests for 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and vanillylmandelic acid (VMA). [Ref ]

Hematologic

Hematologic side effects have included hemolysis, particularly with intravenous injection. [Ref ]

Renal

Methocarbamol (the active ingredient contained in Carbacot) vials for injection contain polyethylene glycol 300 (PEG 300). Larger amounts of PEG 300 can increase preexisting renal acidosis and urea retention in patients with renal insufficiency. [Ref ]

Renal side effects including urine discoloration (black, blue, brown, or green) have been reported after oral administration in some patients. [Ref ]

General

General side effects have included angioneurotic edema. [Ref ]

References

1. "Product Information. Robaxin Injectable (methocarbamol)." Whitehall-Robbins, Madison, NJ.

2. "Multum Information Services, Inc. Expert Review Panel"

3. CAMPBELL DJ, SHERBANIUK R, RIGBY J "FALSE POSITIVE REACTION DUE TO METHOCARBAMOL IN THE SCREENING TEST FOR VANILMANDELIC ACID (VMA)." CLIN CHEM 10 (1964): 447-50

Not all side effects for Carbacot may be reported. You should always consult a doctor or healthcare professional for medical advice. Side effects can be reported to the FDA here .

More about Carbacot (methocarbamol)

Consumer resources

Professional resources

Related treatment guides

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. This information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill. knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate safety, effectiveness, or appropriateness for any given patient. Drugs. com does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of materials provided. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the substances you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist.

Drug Status

Buy Alphapril (Vasotec) Online No Prescription, Alphapril

Buy Alphapril (Vasotec) without Prescription

Alphapril Marketing Information

Alphapril Description

Alphapril is created by pharmacy specialists to combat not also diabetes symptoms as hypertension diseases, kidney problems, and congestive heart failure but it can be helpful for patients after heart attack.

Target of Alphapril is to control and decrease level of blood pressure.

Alphapril operates by reducing blood pressure and regulating blood provision to the heart.

Alphapril can be used in combination with medicines for heart failure treatment.

Alphapril is ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) inhibitor.

Generic name of Alphapril is Enalapril.

Brand name of Alphapril is Alphapril.

Alphapril Dosage

Alphapril is available in:

2.5mg Low Dosage5mg Standard Dosage10mg Increased Dosage20mg Max Dosage

You should take it by mouth with water.

It is better to take Alphapril once or twice a day at the same time with meals or without it.

If you want to achieve most effective results do not stop taking Alphapril suddenly.

Alphapril Missing of dose

Do not take double dose. If you miss a dose you should take it as soon as you remember about your missing. If it is the time for the next dose you should continue your regular dosing schedule.

Alphapril Overdose

If you overdose Alphapril and you don't feel good you should visit your doctor or health care provider immediately. Symptoms of Alphapril overdosage: fainting, dizziness.

Alphapril Side effects

Alphapril has its side effects. The most common are:

nausearetchingmigraineinsomniadiarrhoeatroublesome taste sensationlack of appetitecoughdry mouthfeeling lightheadedfeeling drowsy

Less common but more serious side effects during taking Alphapril:

allergy reactions (urticaria, breathing difficulties, rash, and eruption)easy bleeding or bruisingflu-like symptomsfevertroublesome urinationunusual heartbeatspale skinrapid weight gainfaintingfeeling lightheadedchest painbody acheschills

Side effects manifestations are not only depend on medicine you are taking but also depend on your health state and on the other factors.

Alphapril Contra-indications

Do not take Alphapril if you are allergic to Alphapril components.

Be very careful with Alphapril if you're pregnant or you plan to have a baby, or you are a nursing mother.

Be careful with Alphapril usage in case of having angioedema, throat, heart disease, diabetes, hands, kidney disease, lower legs, lupus, scleroderma.

Be careful with Alphapril usage in case of taking diuretics; aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) as indomethacin (Indocin); potassium supplements; lithium (such as Eskalith, Lithobid).

Nimotop can be not safety for elderly people.

Be careful with great care in case you want to undergo an operation (dental or any other).

Do not use potassium supplements or salt substitutes.

If you want to achieve most effective results without any side effects it is better to avoid alcohol.

Do not stop taking Alphapril suddenly.

Alphapril Frequently asked questions

Q: What does Alphapril mean?

A: Alphapril is an effective strong preparation which is taken in treatment of diabetes symptoms as hypertension diseases, kidney problems, and congestive heart failure. Alphapril can be also helpful for patients after heart attack.

Q: What is generic name of Alphapril?

A: Generic name of Alphapril is Enalapril.

Q: What is avoided while taking Alphapril?

A: Do not use Alphapril if you are allergic to Alphapril components. Try to avoid the state of dehydration. Use Alphapril with great care in case you want to undergo an operation (dental or any other).

Q: In what way does Alphapril operate?

A: Alphapril operates by reducing blood pressure and regulating blood provision to the heart. Alphapril can be used in combination with medicines for heart failure treatment.

Q: What is Alphapril target?

A: Alphapril is created by pharmacy specialists to combat not also diabetes symptoms as hypertension diseases, kidney problems, and congestive heart failure but it can be helpful for patients after heart attack.

Valepil, Valepil

Depakote is used to treat various types of seizure disorders. It is sometimes used together with other seizure medications. It is also used to treat the manic phase of bipolar disorders (manic-depressive illness), and to prevent migraine headaches. Depakote affects chemicals in the body that may be involved in causing seizures.

Use Depakote as directed by your doctor.

Take Depakote by mouth with or without food. If stomach upset occurs, take with food to reduce stomach irritation.

Swallow Depakote whole. Do not break, crush, or chew before swallowing.

Drink plenty of water while you are taking Depakote. Your dose may need to be changed if you do not get enough fluids each day.

Do not stop taking Depakote suddenly, especially if you are taking Depakote to prevent seizures. Suddenly stopping Depakote may cause severe seizures to occur. If you need to stop Depakote, your doctor will gradually lower your dose.

Taking Depakote at the same time each day will help you remember to take it.

Continue to take Depakote even if you feel well. Do not miss any dose. Depakote works best when there is a constant level of it in your body.

If you miss a dose of Depakote, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Depakote.

Store Depakote between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Depakote out of the reach of children and away from pets.

Active Ingredient: Divalproex.

Do NOT use Depakote if:

you are allergic to any ingredient in Depakote

you have liver problems or a urea cycle disorder.

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Some medical conditions may interact with Depakote. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, are breast-feeding

if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement

if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances

if you have a history of alcohol abuse, liver problems, metabolic disease, blood disease, HIV infection, cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, high blood levels of ammonia or glutamine, low body temperature, low levels of albumin, brain problems (eg, organic brain disease), mental retardation, inflammation of the pancreas, kidney problems, or low levels of white blood cells, or if you are scheduled for surgery

if you have a history of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency or unexplained coma

if you have a family history of urea cycle disorders or unexplained infant deaths

if you have a history of mental or mood problems (eg, depression), or suicidal thoughts or actions

if you take any other medicine for seizures.

Some medicines may interact with Depakote. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Benzodiazepines (eg, diazepam), carbamazepine, erythromycin, felbamate, fluoxetine, guanfacine, isoniazid, ketoconazole, risperidone, or salicylates (eg, aspirin) because the risk of serious side effects of Depakote, including changes in vision or other vision problems, clumsiness or unsteadiness, drowsiness, nausea, or vomiting, may be increased

Clonazepam because the risk of seizures may be increased

Topiramate because the risk of high ammonium levels, brain problems, or an unusual drop in body temperature may be increased

Acyclovir, cancer medicines, carbapenem antibiotics (eg, ertapenem, imipenem, meropenem), cholestyramine, hydantoins (eg, phenytoin), mefloquine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (eg, ibuprofen), oral contraceptives (eg, birth control pills), or rifampin because they may decrease Depakote's effectiveness

Anticoagulants (eg, warfarin), barbiturates (eg, phenobarbital), ethosuximide, lamotrigine, methylphenidate, primidone, tolbutamide, tricyclic antidepressants (eg, amitriptyline), or zidovudine because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Depakote.

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Depakote may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

Important safety information:

Depakote may cause drowsiness, dizziness, or blurred vision. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Depakote with caution. Do not drive or perform other possible unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it.

Do not drink alcohol or use medicines that may cause drowsiness (eg, sleep aids, muscle relaxers) while you are using Depakote; it may add to their effects. Ask your pharmacist if you have questions about which medicines may cause drowsiness.

Inflammation of the pancreas is a potentially life-threatening illness associated with Depakote. Symptoms include stomach pain, vomiting, or loss of appetite. Contact your doctor at once if any of these symptoms occur.

Patients who take Depakote may be at increased risk for suicidal thoughts or actions. The risk may be greater in patients who have had suicidal thoughts or actions in the past. Patients who have bipolar (manic-depressive) illness may also have an increased risk for suicidal thoughts or actions. Watch patients who take Depakote closely. Contact the doctor at once if new, worsened, or sudden symptoms, such as depressed mood; anxious, restless, irritable behavior; panic attacks; or any unusual change in mood or behavior occur. Contact the doctor right away if any signs of suicidal thoughts or actions occur.

Depakote may reduce the number of clot-forming cells (platelets) in your blood. Avoid activities that may cause bruising or injury. Tell your doctor if you have unusual bruising or bleeding. Tell your doctor if you have dark, tarry, or bloody stools.

Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Depakote before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery.

Diabetes patients - Depakote may cause the results of some tests for urine ketones to be wrong. Ask your doctor before you change your diet or the dose of your diabetes medicine.

Depakote may increase the ammonia levels in your blood. Contact your doctor right away if you experience unexplained sluggishness and vomiting or mental changes.

Depakote may cause an unusual drop in body temperature (hypothermia). Symptoms may include confusion, lack of energy, loss of coordination, shivering, slow heartbeat, slow or shallow breathing, slurred speech, or unusual drowsiness. Contact your doctor right away if you have any of these symptoms.

Depakote may interfere with certain lab tests, including thyroid function. Be sure your doctor and lab personnel know you are taking Depakote

Lab tests, including complete blood cell counts, blood ammonia levels, and liver function, may be performed while you use Depakote. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments.

Use Depakote with caution in the elderly; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially drowsiness.

Depakote should be used with extreme caution in children younger than 10 years old; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. Children younger 2 years may be at increased risk of serious liver problems.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Depakote has been shown to cause harm to the fetus. Use an effective form of birth control while you take Depakote. If you think you may be pregnant or if you wish to become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Depakote while you are pregnant. Depakote is found in breast milk. Do not breastfeed while you are taking Depakote.

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects.

Check with your doctor if any of these most common side effects persist or become bothersome:

Change in appetite; constipation; diarrhea; dizziness; drowsiness; hair loss; headache; indigestion; nausea; stomach cramps or pain; trouble sleeping; vomiting; weakness; weight changes.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these severe side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); abnormal thinking; change in menstrual period; changes in behavior; chest pain; confusion; dark, tarry, or bloody stools; dark urine; difficulty speaking; difficulty urinating or other urination problems; extreme tiredness; fast or irregular heartbeat; hallucinations; hearing loss; involuntary movements of the arms and legs; involuntary movements or chewing movements of the face, jaw, mouth, or tongue; joint pain; lack of energy; loss of appetite; loss of coordination; loss of seizure control; memory loss; new or worsening mental or mood changes (eg, aggressiveness, agitation, anxiety, depression, exaggerated feeling of well-being, hostility, impulsiveness, inability to sit still, irritability, panic attacks, restlessness); nosebleed; pounding in the chest; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin; severe or persistent nausea, vomiting, or stomach pain; shortness of breath; suicidal thoughts or actions; swelling of the arms or legs; symptoms of infection (eg, fever, chills, sore throat); tremor; unusual bleeding or bruising; unusual weakness; vision changes or blurred vision; yellowing of the skin or eyes.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider.

Depakote is used to treat various types of seizure disorders. It is sometimes used together with other seizure medications. It is also used to treat the manic phase of bipolar disorders (manic-depressive illness), and to prevent migraine headaches. Depakote affects chemicals in the body that may be involved in causing seizures.

Use Depakote as directed by your doctor.

Take Depakote by mouth with or without food. If stomach upset occurs, take with food to reduce stomach irritation.

Swallow Depakote whole. Do not break, crush, or chew before swallowing.

Drink plenty of water while you are taking Depakote. Your dose may need to be changed if you do not get enough fluids each day.

Do not stop taking Depakote suddenly, especially if you are taking Depakote to prevent seizures. Suddenly stopping Depakote may cause severe seizures to occur. If you need to stop Depakote, your doctor will gradually lower your dose.

Taking Depakote at the same time each day will help you remember to take it.

Continue to take Depakote even if you feel well. Do not miss any dose. Depakote works best when there is a constant level of it in your body.

If you miss a dose of Depakote, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Depakote.

Store Depakote between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Depakote out of the reach of children and away from pets.

Active Ingredient: Divalproex.

Do NOT use Depakote if:

you are allergic to any ingredient in Depakote

you have liver problems or a urea cycle disorder.

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Some medical conditions may interact with Depakote. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, are breast-feeding

if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement

if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances

if you have a history of alcohol abuse, liver problems, metabolic disease, blood disease, HIV infection, cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, high blood levels of ammonia or glutamine, low body temperature, low levels of albumin, brain problems (eg, organic brain disease), mental retardation, inflammation of the pancreas, kidney problems, or low levels of white blood cells, or if you are scheduled for surgery

if you have a history of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency or unexplained coma

if you have a family history of urea cycle disorders or unexplained infant deaths

if you have a history of mental or mood problems (eg, depression), or suicidal thoughts or actions

if you take any other medicine for seizures.

Some medicines may interact with Depakote. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Benzodiazepines (eg, diazepam), carbamazepine, erythromycin, felbamate, fluoxetine, guanfacine, isoniazid, ketoconazole, risperidone, or salicylates (eg, aspirin) because the risk of serious side effects of Depakote, including changes in vision or other vision problems, clumsiness or unsteadiness, drowsiness, nausea, or vomiting, may be increased

Clonazepam because the risk of seizures may be increased

Topiramate because the risk of high ammonium levels, brain problems, or an unusual drop in body temperature may be increased

Acyclovir, cancer medicines, carbapenem antibiotics (eg, ertapenem, imipenem, meropenem), cholestyramine, hydantoins (eg, phenytoin), mefloquine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (eg, ibuprofen), oral contraceptives (eg, birth control pills), or rifampin because they may decrease Depakote's effectiveness

Anticoagulants (eg, warfarin), barbiturates (eg, phenobarbital), ethosuximide, lamotrigine, methylphenidate, primidone, tolbutamide, tricyclic antidepressants (eg, amitriptyline), or zidovudine because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Depakote.

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Depakote may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

Important safety information:

Depakote may cause drowsiness, dizziness, or blurred vision. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Depakote with caution. Do not drive or perform other possible unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it.

Do not drink alcohol or use medicines that may cause drowsiness (eg, sleep aids, muscle relaxers) while you are using Depakote; it may add to their effects. Ask your pharmacist if you have questions about which medicines may cause drowsiness.

Inflammation of the pancreas is a potentially life-threatening illness associated with Depakote. Symptoms include stomach pain, vomiting, or loss of appetite. Contact your doctor at once if any of these symptoms occur.

Patients who take Depakote may be at increased risk for suicidal thoughts or actions. The risk may be greater in patients who have had suicidal thoughts or actions in the past. Patients who have bipolar (manic-depressive) illness may also have an increased risk for suicidal thoughts or actions. Watch patients who take Depakote closely. Contact the doctor at once if new, worsened, or sudden symptoms, such as depressed mood; anxious, restless, irritable behavior; panic attacks; or any unusual change in mood or behavior occur. Contact the doctor right away if any signs of suicidal thoughts or actions occur.

Depakote may reduce the number of clot-forming cells (platelets) in your blood. Avoid activities that may cause bruising or injury. Tell your doctor if you have unusual bruising or bleeding. Tell your doctor if you have dark, tarry, or bloody stools.

Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Depakote before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery.

Diabetes patients - Depakote may cause the results of some tests for urine ketones to be wrong. Ask your doctor before you change your diet or the dose of your diabetes medicine.

Depakote may increase the ammonia levels in your blood. Contact your doctor right away if you experience unexplained sluggishness and vomiting or mental changes.

Depakote may cause an unusual drop in body temperature (hypothermia). Symptoms may include confusion, lack of energy, loss of coordination, shivering, slow heartbeat, slow or shallow breathing, slurred speech, or unusual drowsiness. Contact your doctor right away if you have any of these symptoms.

Depakote may interfere with certain lab tests, including thyroid function. Be sure your doctor and lab personnel know you are taking Depakote

Lab tests, including complete blood cell counts, blood ammonia levels, and liver function, may be performed while you use Depakote. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments.

Use Depakote with caution in the elderly; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially drowsiness.

Depakote should be used with extreme caution in children younger than 10 years old; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. Children younger 2 years may be at increased risk of serious liver problems.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Depakote has been shown to cause harm to the fetus. Use an effective form of birth control while you take Depakote. If you think you may be pregnant or if you wish to become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Depakote while you are pregnant. Depakote is found in breast milk. Do not breastfeed while you are taking Depakote.

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects.

Check with your doctor if any of these most common side effects persist or become bothersome:

Change in appetite; constipation; diarrhea; dizziness; drowsiness; hair loss; headache; indigestion; nausea; stomach cramps or pain; trouble sleeping; vomiting; weakness; weight changes.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these severe side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); abnormal thinking; change in menstrual period; changes in behavior; chest pain; confusion; dark, tarry, or bloody stools; dark urine; difficulty speaking; difficulty urinating or other urination problems; extreme tiredness; fast or irregular heartbeat; hallucinations; hearing loss; involuntary movements of the arms and legs; involuntary movements or chewing movements of the face, jaw, mouth, or tongue; joint pain; lack of energy; loss of appetite; loss of coordination; loss of seizure control; memory loss; new or worsening mental or mood changes (eg, aggressiveness, agitation, anxiety, depression, exaggerated feeling of well-being, hostility, impulsiveness, inability to sit still, irritability, panic attacks, restlessness); nosebleed; pounding in the chest; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin; severe or persistent nausea, vomiting, or stomach pain; shortness of breath; suicidal thoughts or actions; swelling of the arms or legs; symptoms of infection (eg, fever, chills, sore throat); tremor; unusual bleeding or bruising; unusual weakness; vision changes or blurred vision; yellowing of the skin or eyes.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider.

Vivonex® Products, Vivinox

Vivonex®

+ Terms and conditions for free shipping: Free shipping and handling offer available on a single order (including any auto-reorder) totaling $49.95 or more, exclusive of any applicable tax. Valid in continental U. S. only. Offer valid on ground shipping only; not valid on other shipment methods. Orders totaling less than $49.95 will be charged $7.95 for shipping and handling in the continental U. S. All orders to Alaska and Hawaii will be charged $29.95 for shipping and handling.

All orders that are requested to ship via UPS Next Day or UPS Second Day will be charged published rates according to the zone and estimated weight of the order. Shipment offerings are selected at checkout. Offer is valid only for individual purchasers; not valid for healthcare institutions or pharmacy purchasers. Products are not intended for resale. Void where prohibited.

++ Terms and conditions for automatic reorder discount: Offer is valid for purchases made through December 31, 2016. Offer is valid only for individual purchasers; not valid for healthcare institutions or pharmacy purchases. Products are not intended for resale. Valid in continental U. S. only. Void where prohibited. This offer is not valid on any BOOST ® KID ESSENTIALS ® or IMPACT ADVANCED RECOVERY ® nutrition drinks .

8am - 8pm EST, Mon - Fri. 9am - 5pm EST, Sat

Except where noted, all trademarks and other intellectual property on this site are owned by Societe des Produits Nestle S. A.,Vevey, Switzerland or used with permission.

All rights reserved.

Nutritional Product Information

This nutritional product is intended for use under medical supervision. By clicking here, you acknowledge that you will use this product as directed by your health care professional.

Ciprofloxacin (Cipro) Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Ciprofloxin

Ciprofloxacin

Ciprofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone (flor-o-KWIN-o-lone) antibiotic that fights bacteria in the body. Ciprofloxacin is used to treat different types of bacterial infections. It is also used to treat people who have been exposed to anthrax or certain types of plague .

Fluoroquinolone antibiotics can cause serious or disabling side effects. Ciprofloxacin should be used only for infections that cannot be treated with a safer antibiotic.

Ciprofloxacin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important information

Ciprofloxacin may cause swelling or tearing of a tendon . especially if you are over 60, if you take steroid medication, or if you have had a kidney, heart, or lung transplant.

You may not be able to use ciprofloxacin if you have a muscle disorder. Tell your doctor if you have a history of myasthenia gravis.

You should not use this medication if you are also taking tizanidine.

Stop taking this medicine and call your doctor at once if you have sudden pain, swelling, bruising, tenderness, stiffness, or movement problems in any of your joints. Rest the joint until you receive medical care or instructions.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use ciprofloxacin if you are allergic to a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, or if you are also taking tizanidine (Zanaflex).

To make sure ciprofloxacin is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

tendon problems, arthritis or other joint problems (especially in children);

a history of myasthenia gravis or other nerve-muscle disorder;

a heart rhythm disorder (especially if you take medication to treat it) or history of long QT syndrome;

trouble swallowing pills;

liver or kidney disease;

a history of seizures;

diabetes (especially if you take oral diabetes medication);

low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia); or

if you use a blood thinner (warfarin, Coumadin, Jantoven) and have "INR" or prothrombin time tests.

Ciprofloxacin may cause swelling or tearing of a tendon (the fiber that connects bones to muscles in the body) . especially in the Achilles' tendon of the heel. This can happen during treatment or up to several months after you stop taking ciprofloxacin. Tendon problems may be more likely to occur if you are over 60, if you take steroid medication, or if you have had a kidney, heart, or lung transplant.

Do not give this medicine to a child without medical advice. Tendon and joint problems may be more likely in a child taking ciprofloxacin.

It is not known whether this medicine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

Ciprofloxacin can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while using this medicine.

How should I take ciprofloxacin?

Ciprofloxacin is usually taken every 12 hours. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Take this medicine with water, and drink extra fluids to keep your kidneys working properly.

Ciprofloxacin may be taken with or without food, but take it at the same time each day.

Shake the oral suspension (liquid) for at least 15 seconds just before you measure a dose. Measure the liquid with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one. Do not give the oral suspension through a feeding tube.

Do not crush, chew, or break an extended-release tablet. Swallow it whole.

Use this medicine for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Skipping doses may also increase your risk of further infection that is resistant to antibiotics. Ciprofloxacin will not treat a viral infection such as the flu or a common cold.

Do not share this medicine with another person, even if they have the same symptoms you have.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not allow the liquid medicine to freeze. Throw away any unused liquid after 14 days.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking ciprofloxacin?

Do not take ciprofloxacin with dairy products such as milk or yogurt, or with calcium-fortified juice. You may eat or drink these products as part of a regular meal, but do not use them alone when taking ciprofloxacin. They could make the medication less effective.

Avoid taking the following medicines within 6 hours before or 2 hours after you take ciprofloxacin . These other medicines can make ciprofloxacin much less effective when taken at the same time:

antacids that contain magnesium or aluminum (such as Maalox, Mylanta, or Rolaids), or the ulcer medicine sucralfate (Carafate);

didanosine (Videx) powder or chewable tablets;

a phosphate binder such as lanthanum carbonate (Fosrenol) or sevelamer (Renagel); or

vitamin or mineral supplements that contain calcium, iron, or zinc.

Avoid caffeine while you are taking this medicine, because the medication can make the effects of caffeine stronger.

Ciprofloxacin may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Antibiotic medicines can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or bloody, call your doctor. Do not use anti-diarrhea medicine unless your doctor tells you to.

Avoid exposure to sunlight or tanning beds. Ciprofloxacin can make you sunburn more easily. Wear protective clothing and use sunscreen (SPF 30 or higher) when you are outdoors. Call your doctor if you have severe burning, redness, itching, rash, or swelling after being in the sun.

Ciprofloxacin side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to ciprofloxacin . hives, or the first sign of a skin rash; fast heartbeat, difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Ciprofloxacin may cause swelling or tearing of (rupture) a tendon. This medicine can also have serious effects on your nerves, and may cause permanent nerve damage.

Stop using ciprofloxacin and call your doctor at once if you have:

severe stomach pain, diarrhea that is watery or bloody;

headache with chest pain and severe dizziness, fainting, fast or pounding heartbeats;

muscle pain or weakness;

a seizure (convulsions);

signs of tendon rupture - sudden pain, swelling, bruising, tenderness, stiffness, movement problems, or a snapping or popping sound in any of your joints (rest the joint until you receive medical care or instructions);

nerve symptoms - numbness, weakness, tingling, burning, pain, or being more sensitive to temperature, light touch, or the sense of your body position;

changes in mood or behavior - depression, confusion, hallucinations, paranoia, tremors, feeling restless or anxious, unusual thoughts or behavior, insomnia, nightmares;

liver problems - upper stomach pain, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

increased pressure inside the skull - severe headaches, ringing in your ears, vision problems, pain behind your eyes; or

severe skin reaction - skin pain followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

Common ciprofloxacin side effects may include:

nausea, vomiting, diarrhea;

abnormal liver function tests.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect ciprofloxacin?

Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any you start or stop using, especially:

cyclosporine, methotrexate, metoclopramide, omeprazole, pentoxifylline, phenytoin, probenecid, ropinirole, sildenafil, theophylline;

a diuretic or "water pill";

heart rhythm medication - amiodarone, disopyramide, dofetilide, dronedarone, procainamide, quinidine, sotalol, and others;

medicine to treat depression or mental illness - amitriptylline, clomipramine, clozapine, desipramine, duloxetine, iloperidone, imipramine, nortriptyline, and others; or

NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) - aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve), celecoxib, diclofenac, indomethacin, meloxicam, and others.

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with ciprofloxacin, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide.

More about ciprofloxacin

Consumer resources

Professional resources

Related treatment guides

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about ciprofloxacin.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use ciprofloxacin only for the indication prescribed.

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2016 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 18.01. Revision Date: 2016-06-30, 11:15:55 AM.

Everything you need to know about antibiotics:

Drug Status

Availability Rx Prescription only

Pregnancy Category C Risk cannot be ruled out

CSA Schedule N Not a controlled drug

Approval History Calendar Drug history at FDA

Ciprofloxacin Rating

361 User Reviews 6.2 /10

361 User Reviews

Ciprofloxacin 500 mg

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Drugs. com provides accurate and independent information on more than 24,000 prescription drugs, over-the-counter medicines and natural products. This material is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Data sources include Micromedex® (updated Sep 2nd, 2016), Cerner Multum™ (updated Sep 5th, 2016), Wolters Kluwer™ (updated Aug 8th, 2016) and others. To view content sources and attributions, please refer to our editorial policy .

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Femodette Pill, Femodette

Private & confidential service All your data is kept private and is only used by our doctors. We deliver in discreet plain packages and never use our brand name or share your details.

Genuine & branded medication Our pharmacy is based in the UK and we only dispatch genuine treatments. Our medical team ensure you receive the correct prescription and treatment.

Next day delivery We make sure all the orders placed before 4:30pm are dispatched and delivered to our patients the very next day in the UK or same day in London.

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Private & confidential service Discreet packaging and payment

Genuine & branded medication From our UK registered pharmacy

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Femodette

How does Femodette work?

This treatment contains synthetic forms of both oestrogen and progestogen. The presence of both these female sex hormones make Femodette a combined contraceptive pill. The changing levels of these hormones are responsible for key events during the menstrual cycle. By altering these levels in a specific way, this treatment prevents conception and provides almost complete protection against pregnancy.

Femodette works to prevent pregnancy in a three-stage approach. One of its main functions is to prevent an egg being released by the ovaries (ovulation). It does this by making the body think that this process has already occurred. It also alters the lining of the womb, making it almost impossible for any potential egg to latch on there and develop. Finally, this medication increases the thickness of the mucus that is present at the neck of the womb, which makes it incredibly difficult for any sperm cells to enter the womb and fertilise an egg. This three-stage approach makes Femodette one of the most effective contraceptive methods available to women. The prevention rate that it provides is over 99%.

What are the benefits of Femodette?

Femodette is a contraceptive pill that is almost 100% effective at preventing pregnancy. It can also be used as a treatment for women who are experiencing particularly heavy or painful periods. Femodette is known to make periods lighter and more regulated, with women experiencing this noticing a significant improvement when using this treatment. Femodette can also help clear the symptoms of acne. Women suffering from this condition have experienced a visible improvement in the appearance spots and blemishes.

Who can use Femodette?

Femodette is suitable for women who are over the age of 18 and who want to use a combined contraceptive pill to prevent conception. This type of medication is widely used, with more than 3 million women currently using hormonal contraceptives in the UK alone. This makes the contraceptive pill one of the safest and most researched prescription treatments available.

There are women may not be suitable for Femodette. You should not use this treatment if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. You may also not be suitable for this medication if you have heart problems, liver issues or if you suffer from uncontrolled high blood pressure or high cholesterol. When you buy Femodette online at 121doc, you will be required to complete an online medical consultation form, which our doctors will use when deciding whether you are suitable for this treatment. It is essential that you include all the requested information about your medical history and any other medication that you are currently taking.

How do you use Femodette?

This is a monophasic contraceptive treatment, meaning that each individual Femodette pill contains the same combination of hormones. You will need to take one pill per day for 21 days, which is then followed by a seven-day break. You may experience a withdrawal bleed during this break period similar to menstruation but you will still be protected against pregnancy. You should start the treatment again at the end of the seven days, even if you are still experiencing the withdrawal bleed.

Ideally, you should take your first Femodette pill on the first day of your period. If you do this, the medication will begin working immediately and you will be fully protected. If you take your first Femodette pill between day two and day five of your period, you will need to use an alternative contraceptive method for seven days (such as barrier contraception). It is very important that you take Femodette as per the instructions. If you miss a day, or take a pill at the wrong time, it can impact the effectiveness of this medication. You should refer to the patient leaflet if this happens, which will give you full instructions on how to resolve this.

What are the side effects?

Femodette is a popular contraceptive pill that is both well researched and widely used. It is estimated that over 100 million women are currently using oral contraceptive medication in the world today. As with other combined contraceptives, the risk of side effects from this medication is very small. Possible side effects can include headaches, nausea, breast tenderness and changes in weight. These symptoms will usually pass once the body has adjusted to the treatment. If you experience any serious side effects, you should go see your doctor.

How to buy Femodette online?

You can buy Femodette online without a face-to-face doctors appointment or previous prescription. To get the medical information they need, our doctor's have created a quick and simple online medical questionnaire, which we have integrated as part of the ordering process. Once your order is placed, our doctors will immediately review your details and decide whether Femodette is the correct treatment for you. If approved, a prescription will be created and sent across to our UK registered pharmacy from where the medication is dispensed. We have a range of fast and discreet delivery services that we provide to our customers at no extra cost.

Treatment Information

Product Name: Femodette Active Ingredient(s): Ethinylestradiol and Gestodene Manufacturer: Bayer Administration: Oral Presentation: Tablets Available Dosage: 20 mcg. 75 mcg Exemption: Subject to medical prescription Application: Offering protection against pregnancy for women over 18 Posology: Take 1 tablet a day for 21 days followed by a 7 day break Description: Femodette is a combined mnophasic contraceptive pill that is 99% effective at preventing pregnancy Drug class: Combined pill (POM) Alcohol consumption: No influence When breastfeeding: Not recommended, ask your doctor for alternatives When pregnant: Not recommended, ask your doctor for alternatives

Download Femodette - Patient Leaflet

Credit Card We accept the following major credit/debit cards: Visa, MasterCard.

Bank Wire Transfer You can transfer funds from your account to our bank, although please note that payments by bank transfer may take up to a further 7 working days.

Safe and Secured

Your safety is important to us

We are one of the UK's leading online healthcare providers, specialising in a range of prescription treatments for conditions such as erectile dysfunction, contraception and many others. Our secure and discreet service allows you to safely order treatment in your ideal quantity and dosage from our UK based pharmacy, fully licensed under the MHRA, CQC, GMC and data protection act.

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Dronactin Indication, Action Of Dronactin, Interactions, Dronactin

Dronactin [in more detail]

Dronactin Indication:

For treatment of perennial and seasonal allergic rhinitis, vasomotor rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis due to inhalant allergens and foods, mild uncomplicated allergic skin manifestations of urticaria and angioedema, amelioration of allergic reactions to blood or plasma, cold urticaria, dermatographism, and as therapy for anaphylactic reactions adjunctive to epinephrine.

Dronactin Mechanism Of Action:

Dronactin competes with free histamine for binding at HA-receptor sites. This antagonizes the effects of histamine on HA-receptors, leading to a reduction of the negative symptoms brought on by histamine HA-receptor binding.

Dronactin Drug Interactions:

Donepezil Possible antagonism of action Fluoxetine Possible antagonism of action Galantamine Possible antagonism of action Metyrapone This combination renders test invalid Rivastigmine Possible antagonism of action

Food Interactions:

Take with food. Avoid alcohol.

Dronactin Chemical Formula:

Buy Esaldox - Levothyroxine - Online Without Prescriptions, Esaldox

Levothroid (Esaldox)

Levothroid is indicated for the treatment of hypothyroidism as a replacement or supplemental therapy in congenital or acquired hypothyroidism of any etiology, except transient hypothyroidism during the recovery phase of subacute thyroiditis.

Specific indications include: primary (thyroidal), secondary (pituitary), and tertiary (hypothalamic) hypothyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism. Primary hypothyroidism may result from functional deficiency, primary atrophy, partial or total congenital absence of the thyroid gland, or from the effects of surgery, radiation, or drugs, or without the presence of goiter.

Use Levothroid as directed by your doctor.

Take Levothroid by mouth on an empty stomach at least one-half to one hour before breakfast.

Do not take an antacid or a product that has iron or calcium in it within 4 hours of taking Levothroid.

If the patient is a child or if you cannot swallow the tablet whole, you may crush the correct dose of the medicine. Add the crushed medicine to 1 to 2 teaspoons (5 to 10 mL) of water. Mix well. Use a spoon or dropper to give the medicine as soon as possible. Do not store the mixture for later use. Do not mix crushed tablets in soybean infant formula. Ask your pharmacist if you have any questions.

Levothroid works best if it is taken at the same time each day.

Continue to take Levothroid even if you feel well. Do not miss any dose.

It may take several weeks before you notice an improvement in your symptoms. Do not stop or change your dose of Levothroid without first checking with your doctor.

If you miss a dose of Levothroid, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Levothroid.

Store Levothroid between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Brief storage at temperatures between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C) is permitted. Protect from heat, light, and moisture. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Levothroid out of the reach of children and away from pets.

Active Ingredient: Levothyroxine.

Do NOT use Levothroid if:

you are allergic to any ingredient in Levothroid

you have untreated adrenal gland problems or high thyroid hormone levels

you have had a recent heart attack.

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Some medical conditions may interact with Levothroid. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding

if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement

if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances

if you have trouble swallowing, heart or blood vessel problems (eg, coronary artery disease), high blood pressure, blood clotting or bleeding problems, pernicious anemia, diabetes, bone problems (eg, osteoporosis), fertility problems, pituitary problems, adrenal gland problems, or other thyroid problems

if you have problems absorbing nutrition from your stomach or intestines into your body

if you had a recent surgery or have an upcoming surgery.

Some medicines may interact with Levothroid. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Many prescription and nonprescription medicines (eg, used for infections, inflammation, aches and pains, nasal congestion, asthma, high blood pressure, irregular heartbeat or other heart problems, blood thinning, mental or mood problems, depression, diabetes, other thyroid problems, high cholesterol, hepatitis, weight loss, heartburn, birth control, hormone replacement therapy, growth hormone deficiency, cancer, seizures), and multivitamin products may interact with Levothroid, increasing the risk of side effects or decreasing effectiveness.

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Levothroid may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

Important safety information:

It is important to take Levothroid exactly as prescribed. Do not take more than the prescribed dose without checking with your doctor.

Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Levothroid before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery.

Diabetes patients - Levothroid may affect your blood sugar. Check blood sugar levels closely. Ask your doctor before you change the dose of your diabetes medicine.

Foods that contain soybean flour (including infant formula), cottonseed meal, walnuts, or dietary fiber may decrease the absorption of Levothroid. Tell your doctor if your diet includes any of these foods. Your doctor may need to change your dose of Levothroid.

Mild hair loss may rarely occur during the first few months of treatment with Levothroid. This is usually temporary. Contact your doctor if hair loss is severe or persistent.

Lab tests, including thyroid hormone level and growth checks, may be performed while you use Levothroid. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments.

Use Levothroid with caution in the elderly; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially heart problems.

Children and teenagers may need regular growth checks while they take Levothroid.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. Your doctor may need to change your dose of Levothroid. Levothroid is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Levothroid, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby.

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects.

No common side effects have been reported with the use of Levothroid.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these severe side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; flushing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue; unusual hoarseness); changes in appetite; changes in menstrual periods; chest pain; diarrhea; excessive sweating; fast or irregular heartbeat; fever; heat intolerance; joint pain; leg cramps; mental or mood changes (eg, anxiety, irritability, nervousness); muscle weakness; seizures; severe or persistent headache or fatigue; shortness of breath; stomach cramps; tremors; trouble sleeping; unusual weight gain or weight loss; vomiting; wheezing.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider.

Customers who bought this product also bought

Dermosol-Dp, Dermosol-Dp

Betnovate helps to reduce the redness, itching, and swelling of skin conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, contact dermatitis, and seborrhea.

Use Betnovate as directed by your doctor.

This medication is usually applied 2 or 3 times daily or according to the instruction. Enough medication should be applied to completely cover the affected area with a thin film. The medication should be gently and thoroughly massaged into the affected area. In certain conditions, the doctor will order the application to be covered with a dressing. Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Betnovate.

Drug Class and Mechanism

Betnovate is a corticosteroid that is used for the topical treatment of skin irritations.

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as possible and continue with your regular schedule. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.

Store Betnovate at room temperature, between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Keep Betnovate out of the reach of children and away from pets.

Betnovate should not be taken by anyone who:

is allergic to betamethasone valerate or any of the ingredients of the medication; has chickenpox; has fungal, yeast, or viral skin lesions; has herpes simplex; has tuberculosis of the skin; has vaccinia.

Possible Side Effects

Side effects that you should report to your prescriber or health care professional as soon as possible:

burning or itching of the skin; dark red spots on the skin; infection; lack of healing of the skin condition; painful, red, pus-filled blisters in hair follicles; severe burning and continued itching of the skin; thinning of the skin, with easy bruising, sunburn more likely especially on the face. Other serious side effects can develop if you use Betnovate for a long time, or if you use too much. Contact your prescriber or health care professional if you notice any unusual effects.

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your prescriber or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome): burning, itching, or irritation of the skin; dry skin; increased redness or scaling of the skin.

Betnovate is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor.

Skincare - Dermosol-dp (Brand name: betnovate)

Betnovate helps to reduce the redness, itching, and swelling of skin conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, contact dermatitis, and seborrhea.

Use Betnovate as directed by your doctor.

This medication is usually applied 2 or 3 times daily or according to the instruction. Enough medication should be applied to completely cover the affected area with a thin film. The medication should be gently and thoroughly massaged into the affected area. In certain conditions, the doctor will order the application to be covered with a dressing. Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Betnovate.

Drug Class and Mechanism

Betnovate is a corticosteroid that is used for the topical treatment of skin irritations.

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as possible and continue with your regular schedule. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.

Store Betnovate at room temperature, between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Keep Betnovate out of the reach of children and away from pets.

Betnovate should not be taken by anyone who:

is allergic to betamethasone valerate or any of the ingredients of the medication; has chickenpox; has fungal, yeast, or viral skin lesions; has herpes simplex; has tuberculosis of the skin; has vaccinia.

Possible Side Effects

Side effects that you should report to your prescriber or health care professional as soon as possible:

burning or itching of the skin; dark red spots on the skin; infection; lack of healing of the skin condition; painful, red, pus-filled blisters in hair follicles; severe burning and continued itching of the skin; thinning of the skin, with easy bruising, sunburn more likely especially on the face. Other serious side effects can develop if you use Betnovate for a long time, or if you use too much. Contact your prescriber or health care professional if you notice any unusual effects.

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your prescriber or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome): burning, itching, or irritation of the skin; dry skin; increased redness or scaling of the skin.

Betnovate is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor.

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Dermosol (Betamethasone)

What is your Risk Rating for this medicine?

The risk of serious side effects for taking this medicine can be different if you take other medicines or if you suffer from a condition. Get your Risk Rating by creating a profile in a few steps.

Benefits:

We monitor your health and alert you to any safety updates and recalls.

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You can create profiles for you and your loved ones.

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Share your story! Tell us how MediGuard has helped you or someone you love. Download the MediGuard Mobile App to manage your prescription and over-the-counter medications, for free. Taking multiple medications puts you at risk for possible drug-drug interactions Monitor the medical treatment of you and your loved ones.

DISCLAIMER: MediGuard is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. MediGuard cannot and does not take into consideration every possible interaction or account for individual responses to medicine. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with any questions you may have before making any changes to your treatment. The use of the MediGuard site and its content is at your own risk. The MediGuard site and the information contained in it is intended for users in the United States and information in other countries may be different.

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Chloraprep - Summary Of Product Characteristics (Spc), Chlorapred

ChloraPrep

- Minor and major surgical procedures

- Implantable device placement

- Prosthetic device placement or removal

- Midline, Peripheral Intravascular Central Catheter (PICC) & CVC insertion and maintenance

- Cardiac catheterisation and Cardiac Cath Lab procedures

- Interventional Radiology procedure

The applicator is removed from the wrapper and held with the sponge facing downward. The applicator is squeezed gently to break the ampoule containing the antiseptic solution, which is released onto the sponge in a controlled flow (for the 0.67 ml the barrel is squeezed; for the 26 ml applicator the lever is pressed). Pinch wings once only to activate the applicator and release the antiseptic. Do not repeatedly pinch or pump the wings in an attempt to accelerate the saturation of the foam. The broken ampoule remains safely contained within the applicator. The sponge is gently pressed against the patient's skin in order to apply the antiseptic solution. Once the solution is visible on the skin, use gentle back and forth strokes to prep the site for 30 seconds. The 26 ml applicator includes two swabs. Clean intact umbilicus with enclosed swabs when applicable. (Moisten swabs by pressing against solution-soaked sponge applicator.) The area covered should be allowed to air dry completely.

It is recommended that ChloraPrep remain on the skin post-procedure to provide continued antimicrobial activity. If removal is necessary, remove with soap and water or alcohol.

Known hypersensitivity to ChloraPrep or any of its components, especially in those with a history of possible chlorhexidine-related allergic reactions (see sections 4.4 and 4.8).

4.4 Special warnings and precautions for use

The solution is flammable. Do not use electrocautery procedures or other ignition sources until the skin is completely dry.

Remove any soaked materials, drapes or gowns before proceeding with the intervention. Do not use excessive quantities and do not allow the solution to pool in skin folds or under the patient or drip on sheets or other material in direct contact with the patient. Where occlusive dressings are to be applied to areas previously exposed to ChloraPrep, care must be taken to ensure no excess product is present prior to application of the dressing.

For external use only on intact skin.

ChloraPrep contains chlorhexidine. Chlorhexidine is known to induce hypersensitivity, including generalised allergic reactions and anaphylactic shock. The prevalence of chlorhexidine hypersensitivity is not known, but available literature suggests this is likely to be very rare. ChloraPrep should not be administered to anyone with a potential history of an allergic reaction to a chlorhexidine-containing compound (see sections 4.3 and 4.8).

The solution is an irritant to eyes and mucous membranes. It should therefore be kept away from these areas. If the solution comes in contact with the eyes, they should be washed promptly and thoroughly with water.

The use of chlorhexidine solutions, both alcohol based and aqueous, for skin antisepsis prior to invasive procedures has been associated with chemical burns in neonates. Based on available case reports and the published literature, this risk appears to be higher in preterm infants, especially those born before 32 weeks of gestation and within the first 2 weeks of life.

Do not use on open skin wounds. Do not use on broken or damaged skin. In addition, direct contact with neural tissue or the middle ear must be avoided.

Prolonged skin contact with alcohol containing solutions should be avoided.

It is important to ensure that the correct method of applications is strictly followed (see section 4.2 above). When the solution has been applied in an over-vigorous manner to very fragile or sensitive skin or after repeated use, local skin reaction may occur including: erythema or inflammation, itching, dry and/or flaky skin and local application site pain. At the first sign of local skin reaction application of ChloraPrep should be stopped.

4.5 Interaction with other medicinal products and other forms of interaction

Alcohol should not be brought into contact with some vaccines and skin test injections (patch tests). If in doubt, consult the vaccine manufacturer's literature.

4.6 Fertility, pregnancy and lactation

There are no studies with this product in pregnant or lactating women.

No effects during pregnancy are anticipated, since systemic exposure to chlorhexidine gluconate is negligible. ChloraPrep can be used during pregnancy.

No effects on the breastfed newborn/infant are anticipated since the systemic exposure of the breast-feeding woman to chlorhexidine gluconate is negligible. ChloraPrep can be used during breast-feeding.

The effects of chlorhexidine gluconate on human reproduction have not been studied.

4.7 Effects on ability to drive and use machines

ChloraPrep has no influence on the ability to drive and use machines.

4.8 Undesirable effects

Very rarely (<1/10,000) allergic or irritation skin reactions have been reported with chlorhexidine and isopropyl alcohol including: erythema, rash (e. g. erythematous, papular, or maculopapular), pruritus and blisters or application site vesicles. Other local symptoms have included skin burning sensation, pain and inflammation.

Frequency not known: dermatitis, eczema, urticaria, chemical burns in neonates.

At the first sign of local skin reaction the use of ChloraPrep should be discontinued.

Frequency not known: Hypersensitivity including anaphylactic shock (see sections 4.3 and 4.4).

The most commonly reported adverse reactions reported are associated with application site reactions. These were noted to occur most often within the area of application of the solution (i. e. at the prep site) and very rarely spread. The adverse reactions were often self-limiting in nature or resolved following treatment with topical steroids and / or antihistamines. The most commonly reported reactions were non-serious in nature and included application site rash, application site erythema, application site vesicles, application site pain and application site pruritus. Frequency, type and severity of adverse reactions in children are expected to be the same as in adults.

Reporting of suspected adverse reactions

Reporting suspected adverse reactions after authorisation of the medicinal product is important. It allows continued monitoring of the benefit/risk balance of the medicinal product. Healthcare professionals are asked to report any suspected adverse reactions via the Yellow Card Scheme at: www. mhra. gov. uk/yellowcard .

There are no reports of overdose with this product.

5. Pharmacological properties

5.1 Pharmacodynamic properties

Pharmacotherapeutic group: Chlorhexidine, combinations, ATC code: D08A C52

Mode of Action: Bisbiguanide antiseptics exert their lethal effect upon bacterial cells through non-specific interaction with acidic phospholipids of the cell membranes.

Chlorhexidine gluconate is a cationic biguanide. Its antimicrobial action is due to the disruption of the cell membrane and the precipitation of cell contents. It has a bactericidal or bacteriostatic action against a wide range of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. It is relatively ineffective against mycobacteria. It inhibits some viruses and is active against some fungi. It is inactive against bacterial spores. It has a superior residual property in comparison to currently available skin antiseptics. Chlorhexidine gluconate has a strong binding property to skin and has a residual property on the skin that has been documented at 48 hours. Chlorhexidine gluconate is not neutralised in the presence of organic matter.

Isopropyl alcohol is a rapidly bactericidal and a fast acting broad spectrum antiseptic, but is not considered persistent. Its mechanism of action appears to be denaturation of proteins.

ChloraPrep is a sterile antiseptic solution containing a combination of 2% Chlorhexidine gluconate in 70% Isopropyl alcohol, which is effective for both rapid and persistent reduction of bacterial load across various body regions for a broad spectrum of organisms. Isopropyl alcohol (70%) provides an immediate kill of transient and resident microorganisms on the stratum corneum and 2% Chlorhexidine gluconate binds to the superficial cell layers of the epidermis and provides a residual, or persistent, antimicrobial property that prevents regrowth of microorganisms.

Clinical studies with 2% Chlorhexidine gluconate in 70% Isopropyl alcohol have demonstrated that the combination offers equal or similar effectiveness in reducing skin bacterial load and more sustained antibacterial effects over longer periods after application, compared to the individual components alone, as well as to other commonly used antiseptics such as Povidone-iodine.

ChloraPrep meets the criteria for chemical disinfectants and antiseptic products as established by European Standards:

EN 1040 - basic bactericidal activity (Phase 1)

EN 1275 - basic yeasticidal activity (Phase 1)

EN 13727 - bactericidal activity (Phase 2/Step 1)

EN 13624 - fungicidal activity (Phase 2/Step 1)

ChloraPrep meets these EN criteria for bactericidal and fungicidal activity for the following organisms at contact times ranging from 5 to 15 minutes, with the exception of Aspergillus brasiliensis. Additional testing of ChloraPrep at full concentration against Aspergillus brasiliensis for exposure up to 60 minutes met EN 13624 criteria, as follows:

Table: In vitro microbiocidal effects

CareFusion UK

Chemetall Group - Antox - Surface Treatment Of Stainless Steel, Antox

Antox®

With Antox®, we offer an extensive portfolio of pickling products for the surface treatment of stainless steels. Our innovative and strong chemical processes create a scale-free surface while at the same time improving the chemical resistance of your stainless steel substrates.

Nowadays, stainless steels can be found in all walks of life. They are increasingly being used for visible parts such as façades, windows, doors and kitchens. Their excellent corrosion resistance is based on a passive layer – a chrome oxide layer that forms spontaneously provided the chrome content of the stainless steel is higher than 12 %. A metallically clean, smooth surface is one of the prerequisite for formation of a protective passive layer.

Chemical processes for metallically clean surfaces

The protective passive layer may be damaged during the processing of stainless steels by drilling, turning, milling, bending, welding or heat treatment. The Antox® technologie ensures that your metal surfaces are protected from disturbing influences such as temperature-related oxidation and discoloration, metal deposition and organic impurities – without changing their surface structure.

To ecologically and economically remove the individual impurities, we offer an extensive technology portfolio under the trade name Antox®. Our stainless steel pickling products improve the corrosion resistance by

allowing a simple removal of contaminants

achieving a metallically clean surface

supporting the formation of a new protective passive layer

All our Antox® stainless steel pickling technologies are free from hydrochloric acid and chlorides.

Our technology portfolio:

Bath pickling agent

Cleaners

Neutralizing paste

Pickling cleaners

Pickling paste

Pickling and polishing paste

Spray pickling agent

Bath pickling agent

Passivating agents

Stainless steel surface care products

Tools such as brushes, manual spray pickling device, pickling pump

Industries we serve:

Architectural applications like for example façades, railings, windows, doors

Kitchen equipment, kitchen utensils, stainless steel tanks

Stainless steel tanks and piping for pharmaceutical, agricultural, petrochemical and food applications

Strong portfolio of technologies for the surface treatment of stainless steels

Eco-friendly processes for added economic efficiency and quality

Worldwide harmonized product and service standards

Competent support for the chemical surface treatment of metals

Kefstar, Kefstar

Why register with MediGuard?

We are a free monitoring service designed for patients like you who want to be in the driver seat of your medical treatment. We have a community of more than 2.6 million members and offer the services below.

Medication Information Personalized Risk Rating Easy to understand overview Serious Side Effects Printable Medication List

Information you can understand Overview on Safety Alerts & Recalls Overview of Medications & Conditions

Community of patients Members’ Feedback Members Treatment Satisfaction

Health condition information Easy to understand overview Commonly Used Medications

Safety checks Safety Alerts & Recalls Drug - Drug Interaction Drug - Condition Interaction

Research participation Option to participate in medical surveys & studies*

Kefstar (Cefuroxime)

What is your Risk Rating for this medicine?

The risk of serious side effects for taking this medicine can be different if you take other medicines or if you suffer from a condition. Get your Risk Rating by creating a profile in a few steps.

Benefits:

We monitor your health and alert you to any safety updates and recalls.

You get to talk directly to other members about their experience.

You can create profiles for you and your loved ones.

Create my Profile Learn more about Risk Ratings

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Share your story! Tell us how MediGuard has helped you or someone you love. Download the MediGuard Mobile App to manage your prescription and over-the-counter medications, for free. Taking multiple medications puts you at risk for possible drug-drug interactions Monitor the medical treatment of you and your loved ones.

DISCLAIMER: MediGuard is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. MediGuard cannot and does not take into consideration every possible interaction or account for individual responses to medicine. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with any questions you may have before making any changes to your treatment. The use of the MediGuard site and its content is at your own risk. The MediGuard site and the information contained in it is intended for users in the United States and information in other countries may be different.

© Quintiles 2016

Beta-Prograne, Beta-Prograne

Beta-Prograne

propranolol hydrochloride

Apo-Propranolol (CA), Bedranol SR (UK), Betachron E-R, Beta-Prograne (UK), Dom-Propranolol (CA), Half Beta-Prograne (UK), Half Inderal LA (UK), Inderal LA, Inno-pran XL, Novopranol (CA), Nu-Propranolol (CA), PMS Propranolol (CA), Rapranol SR (UK), Slo-Pro (UK), Syprol (UK)

Pharmacologic class: Beta-adrenergic blocker (nonselective)

Therapeutic class: Antianginal, anti-arrhythmic (class II), antihypertensive, vascular headache suppressant

Pregnancy risk category C

FDA Box Warning

• In patients with angina pectoris, exacerbations of angina and, in some cases, myocardial infarction (MI) have followed abrupt drug withdrawal. For planned withdrawal, reduce dosage gradually over at least a few weeks and caution patient not to interrupt or stop therapy without physician's advice. If therapy is interrupted and angina exacerbation occurs, consider reinstituting drug and taking other measures to manage unstable angina. As coronary artery disease may be unrecognized, it may be prudent to follow same advice in patients at risk for occult atherosclerotic heart disease who receive drug for other indications.

Action

Blocks stimulation of beta 1 - adrenergic (myocardial) and beta 2 - adrenergic (pulmonary, vascular, and uterine) receptor sites. This action decreases cardiac output, slows heart rate, and reduces blood pressure.

Availability

Capsules (extended-release, sustained-release): 60 mg, 80 mg, 120 mg, 160 mg

Injection: 1 mg/ml

Oral solution: 4 mg/ml, 8 mg/ml, 80 mg/ml

Tablets: 10 mg, 20 mg, 40 mg, 60 mg, 90 mg

⊘ Indications and dosages

➣ Angina pectoris

Adults: 80 to 320 mg P. O. daily in three to four divided doses or 160 mg (extended - or sustained-release) P. O. daily; maximum daily dosage is 320 mg.

Adults: 40 mg P. O. b. i.d. or 80 mg (extended - or sustained-release) P. O. daily. Maximum daily dosage is 640 mg; usual maintenance dosage is 120 to 240 mg/day.

➣ Prophylaxis after MI

Adults: 180 to 240 mg P. O. daily in three to four divided doses; maximum daily dosage is 240 mg.

➣ Hypertrophie subaortic stenosis

Adults: 20 to 40 mg P. O. three to four times daily (before meals and at bedtime) or 80 to 160 mg (extended - or sustained-release) P. O. daily

➣ Adjunctive therapy in pheochromocytoma

Adults: 60 mg P. O. daily in divided doses for 3 days, given after primary therapy with alpha-adrenergic blocker

➣ To prevent migraine or vascular headache

Adults: 80 mg P. O. (extended - or sustained-release) daily; may increase as needed up to 240 mg/day. Effective range is 160 to 240 mg/day.

➣ Essential tremor

Adults: 40 mg P. O. b. i.d.; if necessary, 240 to 320 mg/day. Maximum daily dosage is 320 mg.

Adults: 10 to 30 mg P. O. (tablets or oral solution) three or four times daily

➣ Life-threatening arrhythmias; arrhythmias occurring during anesthesia

Adults: 1 to 3 mg slow I. V. injection. If necessary, give second dose after 2 minutes and additional doses at intervals of no less than 4 hours until desired response occurs.

Contraindications

• Hypersensitivity to drug, its components, or other beta-adrenergic blockers • Uncompensated heart failure • Cardiogenic shock • Sinus bradycardia, heart block greater than first degree • Bronchospastic disease

Precautions

Use cautiously in: • renal or hepatic impairment, sinus node dysfunction, pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, hyperthyroidism, Raynaud's syndrome, hypertensive emergencies, myasthenia gravis • concurrent thioridazine use • history of severe allergic reactions • elderly patients • pregnant or breastfeeding patients • children (safety not established).

Administration

☞ Take apical pulse for 1 full minute. Withhold dose and notify prescriber if patient has bradycardia or tachycardia.

☞ Be aware that I. V. use is usually reserved for arrhythmias that are life-threatening or occur during anesthesia. • Inject I. V. dose directly into large vein or into tubing of compatible I. V. solution (dextrose 5% in water, normal or half-normal saline solution, or lactated Ringer's solution). • Don't give as continuous I. V. infusion. • For intermittent I. V. infusion, dilute with normal saline solution and infuse in 0.1- to 0.2-mg increments over 10 to 15 minutes.

☞ Keep I. V. isoproterenol, atropine, or glucagon at hand in case of emergency.

☞ Don't stop giving drug suddenly. Dosage must be tapered.

Adverse reactions

CNS . fatigue, asthenia, anxiety, dizziness, drowsiness, insomnia, memory loss, depression, mental status changes, nervousness, paresthesia, nightmares

CV . peripheral vasoconstriction, orthostatic hypotension, bradycardia, arrhythmias, heart failure, myocardial infarction and sudden death (with abrupt withdrawal in angina therapy)

EENT . blurred vision, dry eyes, nasal congestion, rhinitis, sore throat

GI . nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, dry mouth

GU . erectile dysfunction, decreased libido

Hematologic: purpura, thrombocytopenic purpura

Metabolic: fluid retention, hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia (increased in children), thyrotoxicosis (with abrupt withdrawal in hypertension therapy)

Musculoskeletal: joint pain, back pain, myalgia, muscle cramps

Respiratory: wheezing, bronchospasm, pulmonary edema

Skin: pruritus, rash

Interactions

Drug-drug. Antacids (aluminum-based): decreased propranolol absorption

Anticholinergics, tricyclic antidepressants: antagonism of cardiac beta-adrenergic blocking effect

Chlorpromazine: additive hypotension

Cimetidine: increased propranolol blood level and risk of toxicity

Digoxin: additive bradycardia

Diuretics, other antihypertensives: increased hypotensive effect

Glucagon, isoproterenol: antagonism of propranolol's effects

Insulin, oral hypoglycemics: impaired glucose tolerance, increased risk of hypoglycemia

Neuromuscular blockers: increased neuromuscular blockade (with high propranolol doses)

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: decreased hypotensive effect

Theophylline: decreased theophylline clearance, antagonism of theophylline's bronchodilating effect

Thioridazine: increased thioridazine blood level, leading to prolonged QT interval

Drug-diagnostic tests. Alkaline phosphatase, blood urea nitrogen, eosinophils, lactate dehydrogenase, serum transaminases, triiodothyronine: increased levels

Glucose: decreased or increased level

Platelets, thyroxine: decreased levels

Drug-behaviors. Acute alcohol ingestion: additive hypotension

Patient monitoring

• Monitor vital signs, ECG, and central venous pressure. • Assess fluid balance. Check for signs and symptoms of heart failure. • Monitor CBC and liver and thyroid function tests. • Watch closely for signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia, which drug may mask. • Monitor blood glucose level in diabetic patient, to identify need for altered insulin or oral hypoglycemic dosage. Be aware that in labile diabetes, hypoglycemia may be accompanied by steep blood pressure rise.

Patient teaching

• Advise patient to take with meals at same time every day to minimize GI upset.

☞ Caution patient not to stop taking drug suddenly. Tell him dosage must be tapered. • Tell patient to monitor pulse and to promptly report bradycardia or tachycardia. • Inform patient that drug may cause muscle aches or bone pain. Advise him to discuss activity recommendations and pain management with prescriber. • Caution patient to avoid driving and other hazardous activities until he knows how drug affects concentration, vision, and alertness. • As appropriate, review all other significant and life-threatening adverse reactions and interactions, especially those related to the drugs, tests, and behaviors mentioned above.

Beta-Prograne

Link to this page:

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Het fashionista meisje gaat naar de Malediven op vakantie. Kun jij haar een prachtige makeover geven? Begin met een fijne gezichtsbehandeling. Na de beauty behandeling volgt de make-up en de kleding! Veel plezier met spelen!

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Posted August 8th, 2016 Oyun Gemisi OYUNLAR

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Posted August 8th, 2016 Oyun Gemisi OYUNLAR

Het fashionista meisje gaat naar de Malediven op vakantie. Kun jij haar een prachtige makeover geven? Begin met een fijne gezichtsbehandeling. Na de beauty behandeling volgt de make-up en de kleding! Veel plezier met spelen!

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Posted May 7th, 2015 Oyun Gemisi OYUNLAR

Race over de velodrome fietsbaan in deze wedstrijd fietsen op de Olympische Spelen van 2016! Haal alle andere velodrome coureurs in en scheur als winnaar van de gouden medaille over de finish in Rio!

Posted August 8th, 2016 Oyun Gemisi OYUNLAR

Win alle wedstrijden schermen op de Olympische Spelen in Rio. Stap naar voren en raak je tegenstander onder of boven zijn verdediging. Stap snel achteruit om zijn aanvallen te pareren. Raak je tegenstander 8 keer om te winnen!

Posted August 8th, 2016 Oyun Gemisi OYUNLAR

Het fashionista meisje gaat naar de Malediven op vakantie. Kun jij haar een prachtige makeover geven? Begin met een fijne gezichtsbehandeling. Na de beauty behandeling volgt de make-up en de kleding! Veel plezier met spelen!

Posted July 29th, 2016 Oyun Gemisi OYUNLAR

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Posted August 24th, 2016 Oyun Gemisi OYUNLAR

Otomatik Bocekler oyunu ile eglenceli dakikalar gecireceginiz bir baglama oyunu sizleri bekliyor. Oyun Gemisi fark?yla ekranlar?n?za gelen bu muthis mobil oyunda otomatik boceklerin parcalar?n? birlestirecek ve en k?sa surede bocekleri tamamlayarak ne kadar zekisiniz gosterme f?rsat? elde edeceksiniz. Bu keyifli oyunun grafiklerini cok seveceginizden emin olabilirsiniz. Iyi oyunlar!

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Sehirde Yapboz Bulmaca Oyunu ile eglenceli bir mobil yapboz bulmaca oyunu ekranlar?n?za geliyor. Oyunda parcalar? birlestirin, sehri ortaya c?kar?n.

Posted December 21st, 2015 Oyun Gemisi OYUNLAR

Buy Hyalart Hyaluronic Acid, Hikamilon

Hyaluronic Acid enhances proteoglycans in the joint matrix, thereby providing support for healthy joint function and maintaining joint shock absorption and cushioning.

As a dietary supplement, take 2 capsules daily, or as directed by a health care practitioner. Take with 8-10 ounces of water, with or without food.

Consult your Health Provider about the dosage appropriate for you.

If you miss a dose of Hyaluronic Acid, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Store Hyaluronic Acid at room temperature, between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Keep Hyaluronic Acid out of the reach of children and away from pets.

Do not take hyaluronic acid unless administered by a healthcare professional if:

You are pregnant or breast-feeding.

Hyaluronic Acid is not known to have any side effects if taken as per the prescribed dosage.

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Mimetix® 3d Plate Innovation Prize At Elrig Drug Discovery, Mimetix

Mimetix® 3D plate innovation prize at ELRIG Drug Discovery

The Electrospinning Company’s multiwell plate for 3D cell culture containing the Mimetix® scaffold was awarded the prize for best new innovative technology at the European Laboratory Robotics Interest Group (ELRIG) Drug Discovery Conference in Manchester in September. The conference was attended by 1100 delegates and the award was given to the exhibitor with most delegate votes.

Mimetix is an electrospun scaffold that mimics the extracellular matrix and provides an ideal environment to support the growth of cells in 3D. The Mimetix multiwell plate is designed to be easy to use and compatible with industry standard automated handling and imaging equipment. The synthetic scaffold, which is 50 microns thick, is laser-welded into the plate, and is available in a range of pore sizes. Mimetix has been validated with a number of primary cells and cell lines, including breast cancer cells and hepatocytes and supports highly consistent cell performance in 3D.

Elena Heister receives the ERLIG prize for best new innovative technology from Dr Del Tresize on behalf of The Electrospinning Company

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February 5, 2014

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The Electrospinning Company Ltd is an SME established in 2010 to develop products utilising the world-class electrospinning platform at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Oxfordshire, UK.

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Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX

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Journal Of Cardiovascular Disease Research - Latest Contents, Cardiovasc

Journal of Cardiovascular Disease Research - Latest Contents

Journal of Cardiovascular Disease Research - Vol 7, Issue 2, Apr-Jun, 2016

Journal of Cardiovascular Disease Research (J Cardiovasc. Dis. Res.) [www. jcdronline. org ] J Cardiovasc. Dis. Res. [ISSN: Print -0975-3583, Online - 0976-2833] An official publication of Scibiolmed. Org (www. scibiolmed. org ), it is a double-blind peer-reviewed, open access international circulating professional journal led by a group of research scientists, vascular disease experts and cardiologists coming from North America, Asia and Europe etc. All manuscripts contributed to JCDR are examined by the editorial staff and usually evaluated by 3 peer expert reviewers assigned by the editors with the understanding that they have not been published previously and are not under consideration for publication elsewhere. Journal is being published quarterly

Editor-in-Chief : Dr. Peng Zhou, MD, Ph. D

ISSN : [ISSN: Print -0975-3583, Online - 0976-2833]

Frequency : Quarterly (4 issues/year)

Indexed and Abstracted in : The journal is indexed with Caspur, Chemical Abstracts, CNKI (China National Knowledge Infrastructure), DOAJ, EBSCO Publishing's Electronic Databases, Expanded Academic ASAP, Genamics JournalSeek, Google Scholar, Health & Wellness Research Center, Health Reference Center Academic, Hinari, Index Copernicus, MANTIS, OpenJGate, PrimoCentral, ProQuest, Scimago Journal Ranking, SCOLOAR, SCOPUS, SIIC databases, Summon by Serial Solutions and Ulrich's International Periodical Directory

Manuscripts can be submitted via Online through JOW

Original Article

Assessment of RV function following Percutaneous Transvenous Mitral Commissurotomy (PTMC) for rheumatic mitral stenosis

Imaging for Chest Pain Assessment: An Algorithmic Approach Using Non-invasive Modalities to Define Medical vs. Interventional Treatment

Do Serological Findings Correlate with Cardiovascular Manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients in India?

Inhibition of Oxidative Stress in Hypercolesterolemic Rats by Soy Milk

Awareness of symptoms and risk factors of Myocardial Infarction among adults seeking health care from a rural hospital of India

Castelli Index and estimative of LDL-c particle size may still help in the clinical practice?

Journal of Cardiovascular Disease Research - an official publication of SCIBIOLMED. ORG. The journals and its contents owned by SBM are licensed by, under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivs 2.5 License. Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available with journals@scibiolmed. org Copyright 2015 ISMGA | Publishing partner: EManuscript Services

J Cardiovascular Dis. Res.

ISSN: Print -0975-3583, Online - 0976-2833

Lamisil - Anti Fungal, Terbinox

Product Description Common use Lamisil is an anti-fungal antibiotic used to treat tinea versicolor, a fungal infection that produces brown, tan, white spots on the trunk of the body or other fungal infections such as athlete's foot, jock itch, and ringworm. Lamisil works by killing sensitive fungi by interfering with the formation of the fungal cell membrane.

Dosage and direction Take it orally with full glass of water. Swallow it without chewing. Usually it taken for 6 to 12 weeks. The recommended dose is different from type of infection: 1. For onychomycosis: Adults and teenagers 250 mg once a day for 6 to 12 weeks. Lamisil is used in children just after doctor's permission. 2. For tinea corporis: Adults and teenagers 250 mg once a day for 2 to 4 weeks. Lamisil is used in children just after doctor's permission. 3. For tinea cruris (ringworm of the groin; jock itch): Adults and teenagers 250 mg once a day for 2 to 4 weeks. Lamisil is used in children just after doctor's permission. 4. For tinea pedis: Adults and teenagers 250 mg once a day for 2 to 6 weeks. Lamisil is used in children just after doctor's permission. Note: this instruction presented here just for review. It's very necessary to consult your doctor before using.

Precautions Before using this medicine, consult your doctor or pharmacist if you have a certain blood disorder or severe liver disease. Don't forget to tell your medical history, especially if it includes lupus. Driving is not recommended while you are taking this medication because it may cause dizziness or less alertness. Drinking alcohol during treatment may cause a fast heartbeat and flushing of the skin. Avoid sun, tanning booths, and sunlamps and use a sunscreen and wear protective clothing when going outdoors. Lamisil should not be used during pregnancy, becoming pregnant or lactating without doctor's advice. Do not use before breast-feeding without doctor's advice.

Contraindications Lamisil is not allowed to people who have problems with their liver or kidneys, hypersensitive to any component of this dug.

Possible side effect They may include an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Also the most possible side effects include: joint pain or swelling, swollen glands, patchy skin color, or a butterfly-shaped skin rash over your cheeks and nose fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms; changes in your vision; weight loss due to taste changes; scaly, itchy, and flaky skin rash; fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash. Less serious include: stomach pain, heartburn, diarrhea; headache; tired feeling; runny or stuffy nose, sore throat, cold symptoms; mild skin rash or itching; unusual or unpleasant taste in your mouth; or decreased taste sensation. If you experience one of them stop using Lamisil and tell your doctor as soon as possible. Also consult your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual.

Drug interaction Lamisil interacts with the following medications: Cyclosporine Metoprolol Nortriptyline Warfarin Also note that interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. As usual it affects the effect of drugs, so consult your doctor about its interactions.

Missed dose If you forgot to take your dose in time, please do it as soon as you remember. But do not take if it is too late or almost time for your next dose. Do not take double or extra doses. Take your usual dose next day at the same time regularly.

Overdose Symptoms of Lamisil overdose may include: dizziness, stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, skin rash, or urinating more than usual. If you experience one of them call your doctor immediately.

Storage Store at room temperature between 59-77 degrees F (15-25 degrees C) away from light and moisture, kids and pets. Do not use after expiration date.

Disclaimer We provide only general information about medications that does not cover all directions, possible drug integrations, or precautions. Information at the site cannot be used for self-treatment and self-diagnosis. Any specific instructions for a particular patient should be agreed with your health care adviser or doctor in charge of the case. We disclaim reliability of this information and mistakes it could contain. We are not responsible for any direct, indirect, special or other indirect damage as a result of any use of the information on this site and also for consequences of self-treatment.

Product Description Common use Lamisil is an anti-fungal antibiotic used to treat tinea versicolor, a fungal infection that produces brown, tan, white spots on the trunk of the body or other fungal infections such as athlete's foot, jock itch, and ringworm. Lamisil works by killing sensitive fungi by interfering with the formation of the fungal cell membrane.

Dosage and direction Take it orally with full glass of water. Swallow it without chewing. Usually it taken for 6 to 12 weeks. The recommended dose is different from type of infection: 1. For onychomycosis: Adults and teenagers 250 mg once a day for 6 to 12 weeks. Lamisil is used in children just after doctor's permission. 2. For tinea corporis: Adults and teenagers 250 mg once a day for 2 to 4 weeks. Lamisil is used in children just after doctor's permission. 3. For tinea cruris (ringworm of the groin; jock itch): Adults and teenagers 250 mg once a day for 2 to 4 weeks. Lamisil is used in children just after doctor's permission. 4. For tinea pedis: Adults and teenagers 250 mg once a day for 2 to 6 weeks. Lamisil is used in children just after doctor's permission. Note: this instruction presented here just for review. It's very necessary to consult your doctor before using.

Precautions Before using this medicine, consult your doctor or pharmacist if you have a certain blood disorder or severe liver disease. Don't forget to tell your medical history, especially if it includes lupus. Driving is not recommended while you are taking this medication because it may cause dizziness or less alertness. Drinking alcohol during treatment may cause a fast heartbeat and flushing of the skin. Avoid sun, tanning booths, and sunlamps and use a sunscreen and wear protective clothing when going outdoors. Lamisil should not be used during pregnancy, becoming pregnant or lactating without doctor's advice. Do not use before breast-feeding without doctor's advice.

Contraindications Lamisil is not allowed to people who have problems with their liver or kidneys, hypersensitive to any component of this dug.

Possible side effect They may include an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Also the most possible side effects include: joint pain or swelling, swollen glands, patchy skin color, or a butterfly-shaped skin rash over your cheeks and nose fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms; changes in your vision; weight loss due to taste changes; scaly, itchy, and flaky skin rash; fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash. Less serious include: stomach pain, heartburn, diarrhea; headache; tired feeling; runny or stuffy nose, sore throat, cold symptoms; mild skin rash or itching; unusual or unpleasant taste in your mouth; or decreased taste sensation. If you experience one of them stop using Lamisil and tell your doctor as soon as possible. Also consult your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual.

Drug interaction Lamisil interacts with the following medications: Cyclosporine Metoprolol Nortriptyline Warfarin Also note that interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. As usual it affects the effect of drugs, so consult your doctor about its interactions.

Missed dose If you forgot to take your dose in time, please do it as soon as you remember. But do not take if it is too late or almost time for your next dose. Do not take double or extra doses. Take your usual dose next day at the same time regularly.

Overdose Symptoms of Lamisil overdose may include: dizziness, stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, skin rash, or urinating more than usual. If you experience one of them call your doctor immediately.

Storage Store at room temperature between 59-77 degrees F (15-25 degrees C) away from light and moisture, kids and pets. Do not use after expiration date.

Disclaimer We provide only general information about medications that does not cover all directions, possible drug integrations, or precautions. Information at the site cannot be used for self-treatment and self-diagnosis. Any specific instructions for a particular patient should be agreed with your health care adviser or doctor in charge of the case. We disclaim reliability of this information and mistakes it could contain. We are not responsible for any direct, indirect, special or other indirect damage as a result of any use of the information on this site and also for consequences of self-treatment.

Product Description Common use Lamisil is an anti-fungal antibiotic used to treat tinea versicolor, a fungal infection that produces brown, tan, white spots on the trunk of the body or other fungal infections such as athlete's foot, jock itch, and ringworm. Lamisil works by killing sensitive fungi by interfering with the formation of the fungal cell membrane.

Dosage and direction Take it orally with full glass of water. Swallow it without chewing. Usually it taken for 6 to 12 weeks. The recommended dose is different from type of infection: 1. For onychomycosis: Adults and teenagers 250 mg once a day for 6 to 12 weeks. Lamisil is used in children just after doctor's permission. 2. For tinea corporis: Adults and teenagers 250 mg once a day for 2 to 4 weeks. Lamisil is used in children just after doctor's permission. 3. For tinea cruris (ringworm of the groin; jock itch): Adults and teenagers 250 mg once a day for 2 to 4 weeks. Lamisil is used in children just after doctor's permission. 4. For tinea pedis: Adults and teenagers 250 mg once a day for 2 to 6 weeks. Lamisil is used in children just after doctor's permission. Note: this instruction presented here just for review. It's very necessary to consult your doctor before using.

Precautions Before using this medicine, consult your doctor or pharmacist if you have a certain blood disorder or severe liver disease. Don't forget to tell your medical history, especially if it includes lupus. Driving is not recommended while you are taking this medication because it may cause dizziness or less alertness. Drinking alcohol during treatment may cause a fast heartbeat and flushing of the skin. Avoid sun, tanning booths, and sunlamps and use a sunscreen and wear protective clothing when going outdoors. Lamisil should not be used during pregnancy, becoming pregnant or lactating without doctor's advice. Do not use before breast-feeding without doctor's advice.

Contraindications Lamisil is not allowed to people who have problems with their liver or kidneys, hypersensitive to any component of this dug.

Possible side effect They may include an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Also the most possible side effects include: joint pain or swelling, swollen glands, patchy skin color, or a butterfly-shaped skin rash over your cheeks and nose fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms; changes in your vision; weight loss due to taste changes; scaly, itchy, and flaky skin rash; fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash. Less serious include: stomach pain, heartburn, diarrhea; headache; tired feeling; runny or stuffy nose, sore throat, cold symptoms; mild skin rash or itching; unusual or unpleasant taste in your mouth; or decreased taste sensation. If you experience one of them stop using Lamisil and tell your doctor as soon as possible. Also consult your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual.

Drug interaction Lamisil interacts with the following medications: Cyclosporine Metoprolol Nortriptyline Warfarin Also note that interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. As usual it affects the effect of drugs, so consult your doctor about its interactions.

Missed dose If you forgot to take your dose in time, please do it as soon as you remember. But do not take if it is too late or almost time for your next dose. Do not take double or extra doses. Take your usual dose next day at the same time regularly.

Overdose Symptoms of Lamisil overdose may include: dizziness, stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, skin rash, or urinating more than usual. If you experience one of them call your doctor immediately.

Storage Store at room temperature between 59-77 degrees F (15-25 degrees C) away from light and moisture, kids and pets. Do not use after expiration date.

Disclaimer We provide only general information about medications that does not cover all directions, possible drug integrations, or precautions. Information at the site cannot be used for self-treatment and self-diagnosis. Any specific instructions for a particular patient should be agreed with your health care adviser or doctor in charge of the case. We disclaim reliability of this information and mistakes it could contain. We are not responsible for any direct, indirect, special or other indirect damage as a result of any use of the information on this site and also for consequences of self-treatment.

Dimefor, Dimefor

Metformin is used for treating type 2 diabetes. It is used along with diet and exercise. It may be used alone or with other anti-diabetic medicines.

Use Metformin as directed by your doctor.

Take Metformin by mouth with food. Take Metformin on a regular schedule to get the most benefit from it. Taking Metformin at the same time each day will help you remember to take it. Continue taking Metformin even if you feel good. Do not miss any doses. Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about its usage.

Drug Class and Mechanism

Metformin is a biguanide antidiabetic. It works by decreasing the amount of sugar that the liver produces and the intestines absorb. It also helps to make your body more sensitive to the insulin that you naturally produce.

If you miss a dose of Metformin and are using it regularly, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Store Metformin between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Brief storage at temperatures between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C) is permitted. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Metformin out of the reach of children and away from pets.

Do not use Metformin if:

you are allergic to any ingredient in Metformin; you have congestive heart failure that is treated by medicine; you have a severe infection, low blood oxygen levels, kidney or liver problems, high blood ketone or acid levels (e. g. diabetic ketoacidosis), or severe dehydration; you have had a stroke or a recent heart attack, or you are in shock; you are 80 years old or older and have not had a kidney function test; you will be having surgery or certain lab procedures. Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Important : Dizziness may occur while you are taking Metformin. This effect may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Metformin with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Follow the diet and exercise program given to you by your health care provider. Do not drink large amounts of alcohol while you use Metformin. Talk to your doctor or health care provider before you drink alcohol while you use Metformin. Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Metformin before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery. Be careful not to become dehydrated, especially during hot weather or while you are being active. Dehydration may increase the risk of Metformin 's side effects. Carry an ID card at all times that says you have diabetes. Check your blood sugar levels as directed by your doctor. If they are often higher or lower than they should be and you take Metformin exactly as prescribed, tell your doctor. This medicine does not usually lower your blood sugar levels. Low blood sugar may be more likely to occur if you skip a meal, exercise heavily, or drink alcohol. It may also be more likely if you take Metformin along with certain medicines for diabetes (e. g. sulfonylureas, insulin). It is a good idea to carry a reliable source of glucose (e. g. tablets or gel) to treat low blood sugar. If this is not available, you should eat or drink a quick source of sugar like table sugar, honey, candy, orange juice, or non-diet soda. This will raise your blood sugar level quickly. Tell your doctor right away if this happens. To prevent low blood sugar, eat meals at the same time each day and do not skip meals. Fever, infection, injury, or surgery may increase your risk for high or low blood sugar levels. If any of these occur, check your blood sugar closely and tell your doctor right away. Metformin may commonly cause stomach upset, indigestion, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea at the beginning of treatment. If you develop unusual or unexpected stomach problems, or if you develop stomach problems later during treatment, contact your doctor at once. This may be a sign of lactic acidosis. Lab tests, including kidney function, fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin A1c, and blood counts, may be performed while you use Metformin. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Use Metformin with caution in the elderly; they may be more sensitive to its effects. Low blood sugar levels may also be more difficult to recognize in the elderly. Metformin should not be used in children younger than 10 years old; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. Pregnancy and breast-feeding: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Metformin while you are pregnant. It is not known if Metformin is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while taking Metformin.

Possible Side Effects

Check with your doctor if any of these most common side effects persist or become bothersome:

Diarrhea; gas; headache; indigestion; nausea; stomach upset; temporary metallic taste; vomiting. Seek medical attention right away if any of these severe side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); chest pain or discomfort; dizziness or lightheadedness; fast or difficult breathing; feeling of being unusually cold; fever, chills, or persistent sore throat; general feeling of being unwell; muscle pain or weakness; slow or irregular heartbeat; unusual drowsiness; unusual or persistent stomach pain or discomfort; unusual tiredness or weakness.

If you have any questions about Hydrochlorothiazide, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Metformin is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people.

Metformin is used for treating type 2 diabetes. It is used along with diet and exercise. It may be used alone or with other anti-diabetic medicines.

Use Metformin as directed by your doctor.

Take Metformin by mouth with food. Take Metformin on a regular schedule to get the most benefit from it. Taking Metformin at the same time each day will help you remember to take it. Continue taking Metformin even if you feel good. Do not miss any doses. Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about its usage.

Drug Class and Mechanism

Metformin is a biguanide antidiabetic. It works by decreasing the amount of sugar that the liver produces and the intestines absorb. It also helps to make your body more sensitive to the insulin that you naturally produce.

If you miss a dose of Metformin and are using it regularly, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Store Metformin between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Brief storage at temperatures between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C) is permitted. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Metformin out of the reach of children and away from pets.

Do not use Metformin if:

you are allergic to any ingredient in Metformin; you have congestive heart failure that is treated by medicine; you have a severe infection, low blood oxygen levels, kidney or liver problems, high blood ketone or acid levels (e. g. diabetic ketoacidosis), or severe dehydration; you have had a stroke or a recent heart attack, or you are in shock; you are 80 years old or older and have not had a kidney function test; you will be having surgery or certain lab procedures. Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Important : Dizziness may occur while you are taking Metformin. This effect may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Metformin with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Follow the diet and exercise program given to you by your health care provider. Do not drink large amounts of alcohol while you use Metformin. Talk to your doctor or health care provider before you drink alcohol while you use Metformin. Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Metformin before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery. Be careful not to become dehydrated, especially during hot weather or while you are being active. Dehydration may increase the risk of Metformin 's side effects. Carry an ID card at all times that says you have diabetes. Check your blood sugar levels as directed by your doctor. If they are often higher or lower than they should be and you take Metformin exactly as prescribed, tell your doctor. This medicine does not usually lower your blood sugar levels. Low blood sugar may be more likely to occur if you skip a meal, exercise heavily, or drink alcohol. It may also be more likely if you take Metformin along with certain medicines for diabetes (e. g. sulfonylureas, insulin). It is a good idea to carry a reliable source of glucose (e. g. tablets or gel) to treat low blood sugar. If this is not available, you should eat or drink a quick source of sugar like table sugar, honey, candy, orange juice, or non-diet soda. This will raise your blood sugar level quickly. Tell your doctor right away if this happens. To prevent low blood sugar, eat meals at the same time each day and do not skip meals. Fever, infection, injury, or surgery may increase your risk for high or low blood sugar levels. If any of these occur, check your blood sugar closely and tell your doctor right away. Metformin may commonly cause stomach upset, indigestion, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea at the beginning of treatment. If you develop unusual or unexpected stomach problems, or if you develop stomach problems later during treatment, contact your doctor at once. This may be a sign of lactic acidosis. Lab tests, including kidney function, fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin A1c, and blood counts, may be performed while you use Metformin. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Use Metformin with caution in the elderly; they may be more sensitive to its effects. Low blood sugar levels may also be more difficult to recognize in the elderly. Metformin should not be used in children younger than 10 years old; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. Pregnancy and breast-feeding: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Metformin while you are pregnant. It is not known if Metformin is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while taking Metformin.

Possible Side Effects

Check with your doctor if any of these most common side effects persist or become bothersome:

Diarrhea; gas; headache; indigestion; nausea; stomach upset; temporary metallic taste; vomiting. Seek medical attention right away if any of these severe side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); chest pain or discomfort; dizziness or lightheadedness; fast or difficult breathing; feeling of being unusually cold; fever, chills, or persistent sore throat; general feeling of being unwell; muscle pain or weakness; slow or irregular heartbeat; unusual drowsiness; unusual or persistent stomach pain or discomfort; unusual tiredness or weakness.

If you have any questions about Hydrochlorothiazide, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Metformin is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people.

Metformin is used for treating type 2 diabetes. It is used along with diet and exercise. It may be used alone or with other anti-diabetic medicines.

Use Metformin as directed by your doctor.

Take Metformin by mouth with food. Take Metformin on a regular schedule to get the most benefit from it. Taking Metformin at the same time each day will help you remember to take it. Continue taking Metformin even if you feel good. Do not miss any doses. Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about its usage.

Drug Class and Mechanism

Metformin is a biguanide antidiabetic. It works by decreasing the amount of sugar that the liver produces and the intestines absorb. It also helps to make your body more sensitive to the insulin that you naturally produce.

If you miss a dose of Metformin and are using it regularly, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Store Metformin between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Brief storage at temperatures between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C) is permitted. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Metformin out of the reach of children and away from pets.

Do not use Metformin if:

you are allergic to any ingredient in Metformin; you have congestive heart failure that is treated by medicine; you have a severe infection, low blood oxygen levels, kidney or liver problems, high blood ketone or acid levels (e. g. diabetic ketoacidosis), or severe dehydration; you have had a stroke or a recent heart attack, or you are in shock; you are 80 years old or older and have not had a kidney function test; you will be having surgery or certain lab procedures. Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Important : Dizziness may occur while you are taking Metformin. This effect may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Metformin with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Follow the diet and exercise program given to you by your health care provider. Do not drink large amounts of alcohol while you use Metformin. Talk to your doctor or health care provider before you drink alcohol while you use Metformin. Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Metformin before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery. Be careful not to become dehydrated, especially during hot weather or while you are being active. Dehydration may increase the risk of Metformin 's side effects. Carry an ID card at all times that says you have diabetes. Check your blood sugar levels as directed by your doctor. If they are often higher or lower than they should be and you take Metformin exactly as prescribed, tell your doctor. This medicine does not usually lower your blood sugar levels. Low blood sugar may be more likely to occur if you skip a meal, exercise heavily, or drink alcohol. It may also be more likely if you take Metformin along with certain medicines for diabetes (e. g. sulfonylureas, insulin). It is a good idea to carry a reliable source of glucose (e. g. tablets or gel) to treat low blood sugar. If this is not available, you should eat or drink a quick source of sugar like table sugar, honey, candy, orange juice, or non-diet soda. This will raise your blood sugar level quickly. Tell your doctor right away if this happens. To prevent low blood sugar, eat meals at the same time each day and do not skip meals. Fever, infection, injury, or surgery may increase your risk for high or low blood sugar levels. If any of these occur, check your blood sugar closely and tell your doctor right away. Metformin may commonly cause stomach upset, indigestion, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea at the beginning of treatment. If you develop unusual or unexpected stomach problems, or if you develop stomach problems later during treatment, contact your doctor at once. This may be a sign of lactic acidosis. Lab tests, including kidney function, fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin A1c, and blood counts, may be performed while you use Metformin. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Use Metformin with caution in the elderly; they may be more sensitive to its effects. Low blood sugar levels may also be more difficult to recognize in the elderly. Metformin should not be used in children younger than 10 years old; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. Pregnancy and breast-feeding: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Metformin while you are pregnant. It is not known if Metformin is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while taking Metformin.

Possible Side Effects

Check with your doctor if any of these most common side effects persist or become bothersome:

Diarrhea; gas; headache; indigestion; nausea; stomach upset; temporary metallic taste; vomiting. Seek medical attention right away if any of these severe side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); chest pain or discomfort; dizziness or lightheadedness; fast or difficult breathing; feeling of being unusually cold; fever, chills, or persistent sore throat; general feeling of being unwell; muscle pain or weakness; slow or irregular heartbeat; unusual drowsiness; unusual or persistent stomach pain or discomfort; unusual tiredness or weakness.

If you have any questions about Hydrochlorothiazide, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Metformin is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people.

Patient Information Leaflet, Erythroped

Please read this leaflet carefully before you start taking Erythroped A. ? It gives a summary of the information available ? on your medicine. If you have any questions or are not sure about anything, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

What's in your medicine?

The name of your medicine is Erythroped A. ? Erythroped A is available as tablets or in sachets.

Erythroped A tablets are yellow and contain 500 mg of erythromycin ethylsuccinate as the active ingredient. Other ingredients in the tablet include: hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, calcium hydrogen phosphate, sodium starch glycollate, maize starch, povidone, magnesium stearate, titanium dioxide, sorbic acid, polyethylene glycol and non-azo yellow colour E104.

Each Erythroped A sachet contains: 1 g of orange-coloured erythromycin ethylsuccinate granules as the active ingredient. Other ingredients in the sachet include: sucrose, azo yellow colour E110, sodium citrate, saccharin sodium, aluminium magnesium silicate, orange bramble flavour, silicon dioxide, surfactant and carmellose sodium.

Erythroped A tablets are available in blister packs of 28 tablets.

Erythroped A sachets are available in cartons of 14 sachets.

Erythroped A is an antibiotic. Its use is described below.

Product Licence Holder and Manufacturer's Name and Address

Abbott Laboratories Ltd. Queenborough, Kent, ME11 5EL

What is Erythroped A used for?

Erythroped A is used to prevent and treat infections such as:

1. Ear, throat and sinus infections

2. Chest infections such as bronchitis and pneumonia

3. Skin and tissue infections such as acne

4. Bone infections

5. Sexually transmitted diseases

6. Mouth and dental infections

7. Eye infections

8. Stomach infections

Before taking Erythroped A

Do not take Erythroped A if you have been told that you are allergic to erythromycin or other macrolide antibiotics such as clarithromycin or azithromycin.

Do not take ergotamine tablets or use ergotamine inhalers for migraine while taking Erythroped A tablets or sachets as this can cause serious side effects.

Do not take terfenadine or astemizole tablets for hay fever or allergies whilst you are taking Erythroped A as these drugs can interact. Consult your doctor or pharmacist who can advise you on other allergy products which you can take instead.

If you have any liver problems or have been told that any drugs you are taking can cause liver problems, tell your doctor before taking Erythroped A.

Erythroped A has not been shown to be harmful during pregnancy but can pass into breast milk, so ask your doctor's advice before breast-feeding while taking Erythroped A.

Tell your doctor if you are taking any other medicine: particularly any of the following drugs: digoxin (heart drug), warfarin (blood thinner), carbamazepine and phenytoin (drugs for epilepsy), theophylline (helps breathing), cyclosporin (used following organ transplants), ergotamine or dihydroergotamine (used for severe migraine), bromocriptine (used to suppress breast milk production), disopyramide (a heart drug), triazolam (a sleeping tablet), or alfentanil (pain killer used in hospitals). The doctor may need to change your dosage.

Taking Erythroped A

The usual dose of Erythroped A sachets or tablets for adults and children over 8 years is 2 g daily in divided doses i. e. a 1 g sachet twice a day or two 500 mg tablets twice a day. ? If you have a bad infection you may be told to take up to 4 g daily. ? The contents of the sachet should be dissolved in a small glass of water before swallowing.

Erythroped A is normally given for 5-14 days. However, the treatment may need to be longer in certain cases. To prevent infections prior to dental work or surgical procedures, treatment is usually given one and a half to two hours before the treatment and continued every 6 hours for eight doses.

If you are not sure about the dose you should be taking or if your dose is different to that recommended in this leaflet, speak to your doctor if you have not already done so.

Take the sachets or tablets until your doctor tells you to stop; do not stop taking Erythroped A just because you feel better. If you stop the treatment too early your problem could come back.

If you forget to take a sachet or tablet, take as soon as you remember. ? Do not take more sachets or tablets in one day than your doctor tells you to.

If you accidentally take more sachets or tablets in one day than your doctor has told you to, or if a child has taken some of the sachets or tablets, seek medical advice urgently. ? An overdose could cause temporary hearing loss, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea.

What problems can Erythroped A cause?

Erythroped A can sometimes cause stomach problems such as feeling sick, vomiting, stomach pain or diarrhoea. ? It can sometimes cause allergic reactions such as rashes which are usually mild, but very rarely allergic reactions can cause difficulty in breathing, fainting and swelling of the face and throat which may need emergency treatment.

Erythroped A can rarely cause jaundice, so if you feel unwell and develop yellow skin and/or eyes, see your doctor immediately.

Reversible loss of hearing can occur rarely with high doses.

There are no reports of Erythroped A causing problems with growing teeth and only rare reports of damage to the blood, kidneys, liver or nervous system.

Changes in normal heartbeat causing dizziness, palpitations and fainting have been reported rarely in patients taking Erythroped A. Chest pain has also been reported very rarely.

Tell your doctor if you develop any of these problems or if you have any other unexpected or unusual symptoms while taking Erythroped A.

How should Erythroped A tablets and sachets be stored?

Do not use these tablets/sachets after their use-by (exp) date which is printed on the blister/carton. If the sachets or tablets are out of date, return them to your pharmacist and, if necessary, get a new prescription from your doctor.

Store these tablets/sachets in a cool, dry place. Keep them safely out of reach of children. Your medicine could harm them.

If your doctor decides to stop your treatment with Erythroped A, return any remaining tablets or sachets to a pharmacist. Only keep them if your doctor tells you to.

REMEMBER these tablets/sachets are for you. NEVER give them to someone else. This medicine may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours.

If you have any questions about your treatment which are not answered by this leaflet, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

This leaflet applies only to Erythroped A tablets and sachets and was prepared in June 1995.

Views On Dozol, Dozol

Thread: views on dozol?

Would you like some help with the sleeping as resolving the issue is much better than drugging the child which is not a solution.

Dozol is licensed for use in children aged 6 - 12 years and should not be used in children under the age of 6 years. Dozol liquid contains two active ingredients, paracetamol and diphenhydramine hydrochloride which is a sedating antihistamine.

How old is your LO? You might find it useful to have a look at the home sleep pages here Sleep - Netmums which cover sleep at different ages, all you need to know about encouraging independent sleep associations and how to deal with the most common settling and waking difficulties.

Come back if you would like help with DDs settling and sleeping

Best wishes Maggie

i am certainly not intending to drug my child it was jus a query thats all. i only give my children meds if they really need it at the correct dosage! i have had great results with controlled crying, i probably posted thread wen i was extremely tired an probably soundid harsh! i hav researched dozol an im aware that it is for 6yr olds now even that i have a 7yr old an i dont think i would give it to him knowing certain facts. thank u

i hear there is a lot of mixed views on dozol, i understand it has a sleep stimulatant. my little one wakes up at least 4 times a nite she has been teething i think from the day she was born i dont think the usual meds help at all. im at my wits end i think its for older children but cud i haf the dose myb??

Hi Emma, My lil one kept waking during the night and I put it down to teething then one day I was looking through baby sights and realised i'd been putting her to bed to late, I put her up to bed round 9.30ish thinking she'd sleep all night and lil did thats the worse thing to do, the site told me to put her to bed round 8ish so i thought it would be worth a try and it sure works she sleeps now till 8am, just wonder if maybe that's what part of your problem may be.

Parent Supporter, Health Visitor Disclaimer

Join Date Aug 2009 Location My place Posts 8,819

Thanks for coming back, I didn't think for one moment you were going to drug your child, sorry if that is the impression I gave I am aware that many other members view and read these posts so I just wanted to share that information with you and others.

Coping with sleep deprivation is shattering and I am very happy to help if you wanted some support with this. Controlled crying does work well see here Sleep techniques - the 'cry' approach - Netmums. How old is your LO? If you can't face CC then there are other gentler approaches you can use see here Sleep techniques - other approaches - Netmums .

Very best wishes Maggie

Join Date Dec 2010 Location la la land Posts 183

i have been taking her out for walks in the nice evenings an now she is sleeping from 8-8am which is fantastic thats all she needid was sum gud old fresh air an tiring out! thanx for ur replies! bye bye to sleepness nite oh she is 2yr.

Join Date Jan 2015 Posts 1

Dozol

My 15mth old baby has been very unwell he's not slept for nearly 6weeks and now my nearly 5year old is up coughing so I searched the net today and read about DOZOL. after phoning around 10 chemists I tracked down a bottle so away went on the bus. at bed time I gave my 15mth 2.5ml of it and my daughter 5ml thinking a nice nights sleep for us all but sure think it was not even 10pm and the baby had been up 3 times by 12am my daughter had been up twice. now it's 4.20am and am sat on the couch trying to get two kids back to sleep. so the answer is dozol dose NOT work worth a bash tho. So if any1 is like me and thinks about giving it a try I would not its a waste of money. prob better buying priton and giving calpol at least you can give priton to baby's. and won't be worried sick. the sleep think in it dose not make my kids sleep that's for bloody sure lol am glad I tryed it rather than sitting thinking what if that dose work. Thanks

Parent Supporter, Health Visitor Disclaimer

Join Date Aug 2009 Location My place Posts 8,819

A very warm welcome to Netmums and thank you for your post and sharing your experience

So sorry to hear your toddler and 5 year old have been unwell and not sleeping Have a look here Cough - NHS Choices and here Coughs, colds, and ear infections - Pregnancy and baby guide - NHS Choices on managing coughs and colds in children

Best wishes Maggie

Join Date Apr 2015 Posts 1

Hi, I'm a mum to two boys, one is 7 the other 1. I first hand can safely say not one thing has worked for my youngest to get him to sleep. From the day he was born he has not slept for 1 night. I've taken him to the doctor repeatedly tried everything they suggested, changed routine changed bed times nothing works. I know some pain relief also for teething does not work. I would also highlight dozol has only recently changed from 2 years to 6 years. And also would like to highlight dozol was used by my mum on me as a baby as it was for 6 months onwards and this was only changed because of people abusing it as a sleeping aid and a child overdosed. (You can search this on Google) I used dozol on my eldest from 18months on as a pain relief which is what it's used for and for teething and vaccination pain (as is also stated on the box) once medication is administered carefully it will not be harmful. Every medication from calpol to dozol is harmful when not monitored.

What Are Protozoa - Definition - Disease Examples, Prozatan

Definition of Protozoa

Updated November 24, 2014

Definition: Single-celled eukaryotes (organisms that possess membrane-bound organelles and nuclei).

Protozoa are found as ubiquitous free-living organisms in the environment. They are classified as sporozoa (intracellular parasites), flagellates (which possess tail-like structures for movement), amoeba (which move using temporary cell body projections called pseudopods), and ciliates (which move by beating multiple hair-like structures called cilia).

Infections caused by protozoa can be spread through ingestion of cysts (the dormant life stage), sexual transmission, or through insect vectors. Common infectious diseases caused by protozoans include malaria, giardia and toxoplasmosis.

Karile, Karile

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A medical license is required for a doctor to practice medicine in a particular state. Requirements vary by state but most require, at a minimum, post-graduate training in the doctor’s specific specialty. An NPI number is a national identifier unique to an individual health care provider and is managed by the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).

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Featured Guides

Contact Lens Care

Contact lenses come in many different varieties to address the vision correction needed. Millions of users wear contact lenses now.

Bipolar Disorder

According to World Health Organization, Bipolar disorder is the sixth leading cause of disability in the world.

Type 2 diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease that you and your doctor can manage with the right combination of medication, diet, and exercise.

Top Guides

Contact Lens Care

Contact lenses come in many different varieties to address the vision correction needed. Millions of users wear contact lenses now.

Bipolar Disorder

According to World Health Organization, Bipolar disorder is the sixth leading cause of disability in the world.

Type 2 diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease that you and your doctor can manage with the right combination of medication, diet, and exercise.

Top Guides

License & Identifications

A medical license is required for a doctor to practice medicine in a particular state. Requirements vary by state but most require, at a minimum, post-graduate training in the doctor’s specific specialty. An NPI number is a national identifier unique to an individual health care provider and is managed by the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).

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The overall average patient rating of Dr. Karile Jonynas is Excellent . Dr. Jonynas has been reviewed by 6 patients who have provided 1 comments. The rating is 5 out of 5 stars.

Cald Resolution No, Cald 3

CALD resolution expressing concern on the process leading to the upcoming referendum on the draft Thai constitution, and urging the Thai government to foster genuine commitment in making Thailand a functioning democracy

The Council of Asian Liberals and Democrats (CALD):

Aware that on 7 August 2016, Thailand will hold a referendum on the new constitution drafted by a military-appointed committee;

Concerned that the drafting of the new constitution was not carried out in a democratic and inclusive manner that would have encouraged commitment among all the stakeholders involved;

Troubled that some of the provisions in the draft constitution could undermine basic human rights and parliamentary independence, not to mention the possible risks emanating from the use of emergency powers;

Alarmed that there have been cases of intimidation, harassment, and arrests against those who criticize and oppose the draft, and even against those who just want an open and free discussion about the proposed charter;

Urges the Thai government to respect, and even promote, any form of campaigns, discussions, and open debates to help keep the public informed about the draft constitution; to allow international election monitoring groups to observe freely the referendum voting process; and to pursue a more reconciliatory and inclusive approach in its next steps after the referendum results become known;

Reiterates the call of the international community to retract any form of restrictions that inhibits free expression and freedom of assembly;

Echoes the call of former Thai Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva, a CALD Executive Committee Member, that the draft constitution is “depriving the people of their right to participate in the political process” and that if it fails, Prime Minister Prayut “must seek to reassess, listen to public, and maintain reforms at hand;”

Trusts that the Thai people would remain vigilant against possible violations of their rights and freedoms before, during and after the referendum;

Believes that Thailand deserves nothing less than a government democratically elected by the people; a government that works for national, not sectoral or parochial interests; and a government that truly respects democratic institutions and processes.

For the Council of Asian Liberals and Democrats:

Oyun Sanjaasuren, MP Chairperson Council of Asian Liberals and Democrats 4 August 2016

This post was written by CALD

Fluconazole Medical Facts From, Flunol

fluconazole

What is fluconazole?

Fluconazole is an antifungal medicine.

Fluconazole is used to treat infections caused by fungus, which can invade any part of the body including the mouth, throat, esophagus, lungs, bladder, genital area, and the blood.

Fluconazole is also used to prevent fungal infection in people who have a weak immune system caused by cancer treatment, bone marrow transplant, or diseases such as AIDS.

Fluconazole may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about fluconazole?

Certain other drugs can cause unwanted or dangerous effects when used with fluconazole, especially cisapride, erythromycin, pimozide, and quinidine. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all medicines you use now, and any medicine you start or stop using.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking fluconazole?

You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to fluconazole, or if you also take cisapride, erythromycin, pimozide, or quinidine.

To make sure fluconazole is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

heart disease or heart rhythm disorder;

a personal or family history of Long QT syndrome;

kidney disease; or

if you are allergic to other antifungal medicine (such as ketoconazole, itraconazole, miconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, and others).

The liquid form of fluconazole contains sucrose. Talk to your doctor before using this form of fluconazole if you have a problem digesting sugars or milk.

A single dose of fluconazole taken to treat a vaginal yeast infection is not expected to harm an unborn baby.

Do not take more than 1 dose of fluconazole if you are pregnant. Long-term use of high doses fluconazole can harm an unborn baby or cause birth defects. Tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment.

Fluconazole can make birth control pills less effective. Ask your doctor about using non hormonal birth control (condom, diaphragm with spermicide) to prevent pregnancy while taking fluconazole for more than 1 dose.

Fluconazole can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take fluconazole?

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Your dose will depend on the infection you are treating. Vaginal infections are often treated with only one pill. For other infections, your first dose may be a double dose. Carefully follow your doctor's instructions.

You may take fluconazole with or without food.

Shake the oral suspension (liquid) well just before you measure a dose. Measure liquid medicine with the dosing syringe provided, or with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Use this medicine for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Skipping doses may also increase your risk of further infection that is resistant to antibiotics. Fluconazole will not treat a viral infection such as the flu or a common cold.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve, or if they get worse while using fluconazole.

Store the tablets at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

You may store liquid fluconazole in a refrigerator, but do not allow it to freeze. Throw away any leftover liquid medicine that is more than 2 weeks old.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. Overdose symptoms may include confusion or unusual thoughts or behavior.

What should I avoid while taking fluconazole?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

This medicine may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Fluconazole side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction . hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

headache with chest pain and severe dizziness, fainting, fast or pounding heartbeats;

fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms;

easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness;

liver problems--nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, tired feeling, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

skin rash or skin lesions; or

severe skin reaction--fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

Common side effects may include:

stomach pain, diarrhea, upset stomach;

changes in your sense of taste.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Fluconazole dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Vaginal Candidiasis:

150 mg orally as a single dose

Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Recommendations: - Uncomplicated vaginitis: 150 mg orally as a single dose - Management of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (after 10 to 14 days induction therapy): 150 mg orally once a week for 6 months - Complicated vulvovaginal candidiasis: 150 mg orally every 72 hours for 3 doses

US CDC Recommendations: - Uncomplicated vulvovaginal candidiasis: 150 mg orally as a single dose - Initial therapy for recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis: 100 to 200 mg orally every 72 hours for 3 doses - Maintenance therapy for recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis: 100 to 200 mg orally once a week for 6 months - Severe vulvovaginal candidiasis: 150 mg orally every 72 hours for 2 doses

US CDC, National Institutes of Health (NIH), and IDSA Recommendations for HIV-infected Patients: - Uncomplicated vulvovaginal candidiasis: 150 mg orally as a single dose - Severe or recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis: 100 to 200 mg orally once a day for at least 7 days - Suppressive therapy for vulvovaginal candidiasis: 150 mg orally once a week

Comments: - Recommended as preferred therapy - Unless frequent or severe recurrences, suppressive therapy generally not recommended

Usual Adult Dose for Oral Thrush:

Oropharyngeal candidiasis: 200 mg IV or orally on the first day followed by 100 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: At least 2 weeks, to reduce the risk of relapse

IDSA Recommendations: - Moderate to severe oropharyngeal candidiasis: 100 to 200 mg IV or orally once a day for 7 to 14 days

Comments: - Recommended as primary therapy

US CDC, NIH, and IDSA Recommendations for HIV-infected Patients: - Initial episodes of oropharyngeal candidiasis: 100 mg orally once a day for 7 to 14 days - Suppressive therapy for oropharyngeal candidiasis: 100 mg orally once a day or 3 times a week

Comments: - Recommended as preferred oral therapy - Unless frequent or severe recurrences, suppressive therapy generally not recommended

Usual Adult Dose for Candidemia:

Doses up to 400 mg/day have been used.

Comments: - Optimal therapeutic dose and therapy duration have not been established.

Use: For systemic Candida infections including candidemia, disseminated candidiasis, and pneumonia

IDSA Recommendations: Candidemia in nonneutropenic or neutropenic patients: 800 mg IV or orally on the first day followed by 400 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: - Nonneutropenic patients: 14 days after first negative blood culture and candidemia signs/symptoms resolve - Neutropenic patients: 2 weeks after Candida cleared from bloodstream (documented) and candidemia symptoms and neutropenia resolve

Chronic disseminated candidiasis in stable patients: 400 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: Until lesions have resolved (usually months) and through periods of immunosuppression

Candida osteoarticular infection: 400 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: - Osteomyelitis: 6 to 12 months - Septic arthritis: At least 6 weeks

CNS candidiasis (after initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 400 to 800 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: Until all signs/symptoms and CSF and radiologic abnormalities resolve

Candida cardiovascular system infection: 400 to 800 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: - Endocarditis: Lifelong suppressive therapy may be indicated. - Pericarditis or myocarditis: Often several months - Suppurative thrombophlebitis: At least 2 weeks after candidemia cleared - Infected pacemaker, implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), or ventricular assist device (VAD): 4 to 6 weeks after device removed; chronic suppressive therapy if VAD not removed

Comments: - Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients: Recommended as primary therapy; an echinocandin is recommended for moderately severe to severe illness or recent azole exposure; switching to this drug after initial echinocandin is often appropriate. - Candidemia in neutropenic patients: Recommended as alternative therapy; an echinocandin or IV amphotericin B preferred for most patients; this drug recommended for patients without recent azole exposure and who are not critically ill. - Recommended as primary therapy for chronic disseminated candidiasis in stable patients, Candida osteoarticular infection, CNS candidiasis, pericarditis/myocarditis, and suppurative thrombophlebitis - Recommended as alternative therapy for endocarditis and infected pacemaker, ICD, or VAD

Usual Adult Dose for Fungal Pneumonia:

Doses up to 400 mg/day have been used.

Comments: - Optimal therapeutic dose and therapy duration have not been established.

Use: For systemic Candida infections including candidemia, disseminated candidiasis, and pneumonia

IDSA Recommendations: Candidemia in nonneutropenic or neutropenic patients: 800 mg IV or orally on the first day followed by 400 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: - Nonneutropenic patients: 14 days after first negative blood culture and candidemia signs/symptoms resolve - Neutropenic patients: 2 weeks after Candida cleared from bloodstream (documented) and candidemia symptoms and neutropenia resolve

Chronic disseminated candidiasis in stable patients: 400 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: Until lesions have resolved (usually months) and through periods of immunosuppression

Candida osteoarticular infection: 400 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: - Osteomyelitis: 6 to 12 months - Septic arthritis: At least 6 weeks

CNS candidiasis (after initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 400 to 800 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: Until all signs/symptoms and CSF and radiologic abnormalities resolve

Candida cardiovascular system infection: 400 to 800 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: - Endocarditis: Lifelong suppressive therapy may be indicated. - Pericarditis or myocarditis: Often several months - Suppurative thrombophlebitis: At least 2 weeks after candidemia cleared - Infected pacemaker, implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), or ventricular assist device (VAD): 4 to 6 weeks after device removed; chronic suppressive therapy if VAD not removed

Comments: - Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients: Recommended as primary therapy; an echinocandin is recommended for moderately severe to severe illness or recent azole exposure; switching to this drug after initial echinocandin is often appropriate. - Candidemia in neutropenic patients: Recommended as alternative therapy; an echinocandin or IV amphotericin B preferred for most patients; this drug recommended for patients without recent azole exposure and who are not critically ill. - Recommended as primary therapy for chronic disseminated candidiasis in stable patients, Candida osteoarticular infection, CNS candidiasis, pericarditis/myocarditis, and suppurative thrombophlebitis - Recommended as alternative therapy for endocarditis and infected pacemaker, ICD, or VAD

Usual Adult Dose for Fungal Infection -- Disseminated:

Doses up to 400 mg/day have been used.

Comments: - Optimal therapeutic dose and therapy duration have not been established.

Use: For systemic Candida infections including candidemia, disseminated candidiasis, and pneumonia

IDSA Recommendations: Candidemia in nonneutropenic or neutropenic patients: 800 mg IV or orally on the first day followed by 400 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: - Nonneutropenic patients: 14 days after first negative blood culture and candidemia signs/symptoms resolve - Neutropenic patients: 2 weeks after Candida cleared from bloodstream (documented) and candidemia symptoms and neutropenia resolve

Chronic disseminated candidiasis in stable patients: 400 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: Until lesions have resolved (usually months) and through periods of immunosuppression

Candida osteoarticular infection: 400 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: - Osteomyelitis: 6 to 12 months - Septic arthritis: At least 6 weeks

CNS candidiasis (after initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 400 to 800 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: Until all signs/symptoms and CSF and radiologic abnormalities resolve

Candida cardiovascular system infection: 400 to 800 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: - Endocarditis: Lifelong suppressive therapy may be indicated. - Pericarditis or myocarditis: Often several months - Suppurative thrombophlebitis: At least 2 weeks after candidemia cleared - Infected pacemaker, implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), or ventricular assist device (VAD): 4 to 6 weeks after device removed; chronic suppressive therapy if VAD not removed

Comments: - Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients: Recommended as primary therapy; an echinocandin is recommended for moderately severe to severe illness or recent azole exposure; switching to this drug after initial echinocandin is often appropriate. - Candidemia in neutropenic patients: Recommended as alternative therapy; an echinocandin or IV amphotericin B preferred for most patients; this drug recommended for patients without recent azole exposure and who are not critically ill. - Recommended as primary therapy for chronic disseminated candidiasis in stable patients, Candida osteoarticular infection, CNS candidiasis, pericarditis/myocarditis, and suppurative thrombophlebitis - Recommended as alternative therapy for endocarditis and infected pacemaker, ICD, or VAD

Usual Adult Dose for Systemic Candidiasis:

Doses up to 400 mg/day have been used.

Comments: - Optimal therapeutic dose and therapy duration have not been established.

Use: For systemic Candida infections including candidemia, disseminated candidiasis, and pneumonia

IDSA Recommendations: Candidemia in nonneutropenic or neutropenic patients: 800 mg IV or orally on the first day followed by 400 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: - Nonneutropenic patients: 14 days after first negative blood culture and candidemia signs/symptoms resolve - Neutropenic patients: 2 weeks after Candida cleared from bloodstream (documented) and candidemia symptoms and neutropenia resolve

Chronic disseminated candidiasis in stable patients: 400 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: Until lesions have resolved (usually months) and through periods of immunosuppression

Candida osteoarticular infection: 400 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: - Osteomyelitis: 6 to 12 months - Septic arthritis: At least 6 weeks

CNS candidiasis (after initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 400 to 800 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: Until all signs/symptoms and CSF and radiologic abnormalities resolve

Candida cardiovascular system infection: 400 to 800 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: - Endocarditis: Lifelong suppressive therapy may be indicated. - Pericarditis or myocarditis: Often several months - Suppurative thrombophlebitis: At least 2 weeks after candidemia cleared - Infected pacemaker, implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), or ventricular assist device (VAD): 4 to 6 weeks after device removed; chronic suppressive therapy if VAD not removed

Comments: - Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients: Recommended as primary therapy; an echinocandin is recommended for moderately severe to severe illness or recent azole exposure; switching to this drug after initial echinocandin is often appropriate. - Candidemia in neutropenic patients: Recommended as alternative therapy; an echinocandin or IV amphotericin B preferred for most patients; this drug recommended for patients without recent azole exposure and who are not critically ill. - Recommended as primary therapy for chronic disseminated candidiasis in stable patients, Candida osteoarticular infection, CNS candidiasis, pericarditis/myocarditis, and suppurative thrombophlebitis - Recommended as alternative therapy for endocarditis and infected pacemaker, ICD, or VAD

Usual Adult Dose for Esophageal Candidiasis:

200 mg IV or orally on the first day followed by 100 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: At least 3 weeks and for at least 2 weeks after symptoms resolve

Comments: - Doses up to 400 mg/day may be used based on clinical judgment of patient response.

IDSA Recommendations: 200 to 400 mg IV or orally once a day for 14 to 21 days

Comments: - Recommended as primary therapy; oral fluconazole is preferred.

US CDC, NIH, and IDSA Recommendations for HIV-infected Patients: 100 to 400 mg IV or orally once a day for 14 to 21 days - Suppressive therapy: 100 to 200 mg orally once a day

Comments: - Recommended as preferred therapy - Unless frequent or severe recurrences, suppressive therapy generally not recommended

Usual Adult Dose for Candida Urinary Tract Infection:

50 to 200 mg IV or orally once a day

Use: For the treatment of Candida urinary tract infections and peritonitis

IDSA Recommendations: - Asymptomatic cystitis in patients undergoing urologic procedures: 200 to 400 mg IV or orally once a day for several days before and after the procedure - Symptomatic cystitis: 200 mg IV or orally once a day for 2 weeks - Pyelonephritis: 200 to 400 mg IV or orally once a day for 2 weeks - Urinary fungus balls: 200 to 400 mg IV or orally once a day until symptoms resolve and urine cultures clear of Candida

Comments: - Recommended as primary therapy - The suggested dose for candidemia is recommended for patients with pyelonephritis and suspected disseminated candidiasis. - Surgical removal of urinary fungus balls strongly recommended.

Usual Adult Dose for Fungal Peritonitis:

50 to 200 mg IV or orally once a day

Use: For the treatment of Candida urinary tract infections and peritonitis

IDSA Recommendations: - Asymptomatic cystitis in patients undergoing urologic procedures: 200 to 400 mg IV or orally once a day for several days before and after the procedure - Symptomatic cystitis: 200 mg IV or orally once a day for 2 weeks - Pyelonephritis: 200 to 400 mg IV or orally once a day for 2 weeks - Urinary fungus balls: 200 to 400 mg IV or orally once a day until symptoms resolve and urine cultures clear of Candida

Comments: - Recommended as primary therapy - The suggested dose for candidemia is recommended for patients with pyelonephritis and suspected disseminated candidiasis. - Surgical removal of urinary fungus balls strongly recommended.

Usual Adult Dose for Cryptococcal Meningitis -- Immunocompetent Host:

Acute infection: 400 mg IV or orally on the first day followed by 200 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: 10 to 12 weeks after CSF culture is negative

Comments: - Dose of 400 mg IV or orally once a day may be used based on clinical judgment of patient response.

IDSA Recommendations: - Consolidation therapy (after induction therapy): 400 to 800 mg orally once a day for 8 weeks - Maintenance therapy: 200 mg orally once a day for 6 to 12 months

Comments: - Preferred agent - The higher dose (800 mg/day) is recommended for consolidation therapy if the 2-week induction regimen was used. - Maintenance therapy is recommended to prevent relapse.

Cerebral cryptococcoma: - Consolidation and maintenance therapy (after induction therapy): 400 to 800 mg orally once a day for 6 to 18 months

Usual Adult Dose for Cryptococcal Meningitis -- Immunosuppressed Host:

Acute infection: 400 mg IV or orally on the first day followed by 200 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: 10 to 12 weeks after CSF culture is negative

Comments: - Dose of 400 mg IV or orally once a day may be used based on clinical judgment of patient response.

Suppression of relapse in patients with AIDS: 200 mg IV or orally once a day

IDSA Recommendations: HIV-infected patients: - Induction therapy: 800 to 2000 mg orally once a day for 6 to 12 weeks, depending on regimen - Consolidation therapy (after induction therapy): 400 mg orally once a day for at least 8 weeks - Maintenance (suppressive) and prophylactic therapy: 200 mg orally once a day for at least 12 months

Comments: - Recommended as an alternative for induction therapy; use is not encouraged. - Preferred agent for consolidation therapy and maintenance and prophylactic therapy

Organ transplant recipients: - Consolidation therapy (after induction therapy): 400 to 800 mg orally once a day for 8 weeks - Maintenance therapy: 200 to 400 mg orally once a day for 6 to 12 months

Cerebral cryptococcoma: - Consolidation and maintenance therapy (after induction therapy): 400 to 800 mg orally once a day for 6 to 18 months

US CDC, NIH, and IDSA Recommendations for HIV-infected Patients: - Induction therapy: 400 to 1200 mg IV or orally once a day for at least 2 weeks - Consolidation therapy (after at least 2 weeks successful induction therapy): 400 mg IV or orally once a day for at least 8 weeks - Maintenance therapy: 200 mg orally once a day for at least 1 year

Comments: - Recommended for use in alternative regimens for induction therapy; dose depends on regimen (i. e. used with amphotericin B, flucytosine, or alone). - Recommended as preferred regimen for consolidation therapy; should be followed by maintenance therapy - Recommended as preferred regimen for maintenance therapy

Usual Adult Dose for Cryptococcosis:

IDSA Recommendations: Mild to moderate pulmonary infection and nonmeningeal, nonpulmonary infection if CNS disease ruled out, no fungemia, single site of infection, no immunosuppressive risk factors: 400 mg orally once a day for 6 to 12 months

Severe pulmonary infection and nonmeningeal, nonpulmonary infection with cryptococcemia: - Consolidation therapy (after induction therapy): 400 to 800 mg orally once a day for at least 8 weeks - Maintenance therapy: 200 to 400 mg orally once a day for 12 months

Comments: - Preferred agent - Maintenance therapy is recommended to prevent relapse. - Primary prophylaxis not routinely recommended.

US CDC, NIH, and IDSA Recommendations for HIV-infected Patients: Non-CNS cryptococcosis with mild to moderate symptoms and focal pulmonary infiltrates: 400 mg orally once a day for 12 months

Non-CNS, extrapulmonary cryptococcosis and diffuse pulmonary disease: - Induction therapy: 400 to 1200 mg IV or orally once a day for at least 2 weeks - Consolidation therapy (after at least 2 weeks successful induction therapy): 400 mg IV or orally once a day for at least 8 weeks - Maintenance therapy: 200 mg orally once a day for at least 1 year

Comments: - Recommended for use in alternative regimens for induction therapy; dose depends on regimen (i. e. used with amphotericin B, flucytosine, or alone). - Recommended as preferred regimen for consolidation therapy; should be followed by maintenance therapy - Recommended as preferred regimen for maintenance therapy

Usual Adult Dose for Fungal Infection Prophylaxis:

400 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: 7 days after neutrophil count rises above 1000 cells/mm3

Comments: - If severe granulocytopenia (less than 500 neutrophils/mm3) is expected, prophylaxis should start several days before the likely onset of neutropenia.

Use: For prophylaxis to reduce the incidence of candidiasis in bone marrow transplantation recipients who receive cytotoxic chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy

IDSA Recommendations: Empiric therapy for suspected candidiasis in nonneutropenic or neutropenic patients: 800 mg IV or orally on the first day followed by 400 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: - Nonneutropenic patients: Uncertain; should discontinue if cultures and/or serodiagnostic test results negative

Comments: - Suspected candidiasis in nonneutropenic patients: Recommended as primary therapy; an echinocandin is preferred for moderately severe to severe illness or recent azole exposure; patient selection should be based on clinical risk factors, serologic tests, and culture data. - Suspected candidiasis in neutropenic patients: Recommended as alternative therapy; should start empiric therapy after 4 days persistent fever despite antibiotics; serodiagnostic and computed tomography (CT) imaging may help; should not use in patients with prior azole prophylaxis.

Usual Adult Dose for Coccidioidomycosis -- Meningitis:

IDSA Recommendations: 400 mg orally once a day

Comments: - Some experts start therapy with 800 to 1000 mg/day. - Patients who respond to therapy should continue this treatment indefinitely.

US CDC, NIH, and IDSA Recommendations for HIV-infected Patients: - Meningeal infection: 400 to 800 mg IV or orally once a day - Chronic suppressive therapy: 400 mg orally once a day

Comments: - Recommended as preferred therapy for meningeal infection and chronic suppressive therapy - A specialist should be consulted for meningeal infections. - Since relapse is common (80%), suppressive therapy should be lifelong.

Usual Adult Dose for Coccidioidomycosis:

IDSA Recommendations: 400 to 800 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: - Uncomplicated coccidioidal pneumonia: 3 to 6 months - Diffuse pneumonia and chronic progressive fibrocavitary pneumonia: At least 1 year

Comments: - Therapy for diffuse pneumonia is usually started with high-dose fluconazole; if therapy started with IV amphotericin B (e. g. if significant hypoxia or rapid deterioration), may switch to oral azole antifungal therapy after evident improvement; total duration of therapy should be at least 1 year; oral azole therapy should continue as secondary prophylaxis in severely immunodeficient patients. - Initial therapy with oral azole antifungals is recommended for chronic progressive fibrocavitary pneumonia. - Initial therapy for nonmeningeal disseminated infection (extrapulmonary) is generally started with oral azole antifungals, most often fluconazole or itraconazole; clinical trials used 400 mg/day; some experts recommend up to 2 g/day of fluconazole.

US CDC, NIH, and IDSA Recommendations for HIV-infected Patients: - Primary prophylaxis: 400 mg orally once a day - Mild infections (e. g. focal pneumonia): 400 mg orally once a day - Severe nonmeningeal infection (diffuse pulmonary or severely ill patients with extrathoracic disseminated disease) - acute phase: 400 mg IV or orally once a day - Chronic suppressive therapy (secondary prophylaxis): 400 mg orally once a day

Comments: - Recommended as preferred therapy for mild infection and chronic suppressive therapy - Recommended as alternative therapy for severe nonmeningeal infection; some experts add a triazole to amphotericin B (preferred therapy) and continue the triazole after amphotericin B is stopped.

Usual Adult Dose for Histoplasmosis:

IDSA Recommendations: - Disseminated infections in patients without AIDS: 200 to 800 mg IV or orally once a day for at least 12 months - CNS infection (after initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 200 to 400 mg IV or orally once a day for 12 months

Comments: - Recommended as alternative therapy in patients unable to use itraconazole

US CDC, NIH, and IDSA Recommendations for HIV-infected Patients: - Less severe disseminated infection: 800 mg orally once a day for at least 12 months - Long-term suppressive therapy (secondary prophylaxis): 400 mg orally once a day for more than 1 year

Comments: - Recommended as alternative therapy - This drug should only be used for treatment of less severe disseminated infection in moderately ill patients intolerant of itraconazole.

Usual Adult Dose for Blastomycosis:

IDSA Recommendations: - Mild to moderate pulmonary infection or mild to moderate disseminated infection without CNS involvement: 400 to 800 mg orally once a day for at least 6 to 12 months - CNS infection (after initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 800 mg orally once a day for at least 12 months and until CSF abnormalities resolve

Comments: - Recommended as alternative therapy for mild to moderate pulmonary infection or mild to moderate disseminated infection without CNS involvement - Recommended as follow-up therapy for CNS infection

Usual Adult Dose for Onychomycosis -- Fingernail:

Some experts recommend: 150 to 300 mg orally once a week Duration of therapy: - Fingernail infections: 3 to 6 months - Toenail infections: 6 to 12 months

Usual Adult Dose for Onychomycosis -- Toenail:

Some experts recommend: 150 to 300 mg orally once a week Duration of therapy: - Fingernail infections: 3 to 6 months - Toenail infections: 6 to 12 months

Usual Adult Dose for Sporotrichosis:

IDSA Recommendations: Cutaneous or lymphocutaneous infection: 400 to 800 mg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: 2 to 4 weeks after all lesions resolve (usually 3 to 6 months total)

Comments: - Recommended as alternative therapy; should only be used if other agents are not tolerated

Usual Pediatric Dose for Esophageal Candidiasis:

2 weeks or younger (gestational age 26 to 29 weeks): 3 mg/kg IV or orally every 72 hours Older than 2 weeks: 6 mg/kg IV or orally on the first day followed by 3 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: At least 3 weeks and for at least 2 weeks after symptoms resolve

Comments: - Doses up to 12 mg/kg/day may be used in patients older than 2 weeks based on clinical judgment of patient response; this correlates to 12 mg/kg/72 hours in premature newborns during their first 2 weeks of life.

IDSA Recommendations: 3 to 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day for 14 to 21 days

Comments: - Recommended as primary therapy; oral fluconazole is preferred.

US CDC, NIH, IDSA, Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), and American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Recommendations for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected Children: 6 to 12 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Maximum dose: 600 mg/dose Duration of therapy: At least 3 weeks and for at least 2 weeks after symptoms resolve

Comments: - Oral fluconazole recommended as preferred therapy; IV dosing recommended as alternative therapy for infants and children of all ages. - If neonate creatinine level is greater than 1.2 mg/dL for 3 consecutive doses, the dosing interval for the higher dose may be extended to 12 mg/kg every 48 hours until serum creatinine level is less than 1.2 mg/dL.

US CDC, NIH, and IDSA Recommendations for HIV-infected Adolescents: 100 to 400 mg IV or orally once a day for 14 to 21 days - Suppressive therapy: 100 to 200 mg orally once a day

Comments: - Recommended as preferred therapy - Unless frequent or severe recurrences, suppressive therapy generally not recommended

Usual Pediatric Dose for Oral Thrush:

Oropharyngeal candidiasis: 2 weeks or younger (gestational age 26 to 29 weeks): 3 mg/kg IV or orally every 72 hours Older than 2 weeks: 6 mg/kg IV or orally on the first day followed by 3 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: At least 2 weeks, to reduce the risk of relapse

US CDC, NIH, IDSA, PIDS, and AAP Recommendations for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected Children: 6 to 12 mg/kg orally once a day Maximum dose: 400 mg/dose Duration of therapy: 7 to 14 days

Comments: - Recommended as preferred therapy; oral fluconazole recommended for moderate or severe oropharyngeal candidiasis.

US CDC, NIH, and IDSA Recommendations for HIV-infected Adolescents: - Initial episodes: 100 mg orally once a day for 7 to 14 days - Suppressive therapy: 100 mg orally once a day or 3 times a week

Comments: - Recommended as preferred oral therapy - Unless frequent or severe recurrences, suppressive therapy generally not recommended

Usual Pediatric Dose for Candidemia:

2 weeks or younger (gestational age 26 to 29 weeks): 6 to 12 mg/kg IV or orally every 72 hours Older than 2 weeks: 6 to 12 mg/kg/day IV or orally

Use: For the treatment of candidemia and disseminated Candida infections

IDSA Recommendations: Neonatal candidiasis: 12 mg/kg IV or orally once a day for at least 3 weeks

Candidemia in nonneutropenic or neutropenic patients: 12 mg/kg IV or orally on the first day followed by 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: - Nonneutropenic patients: 14 days after first negative blood culture and candidemia signs/symptoms resolve - Neutropenic patients: 2 weeks after Candida cleared from bloodstream (documented) and candidemia symptoms and neutropenia resolve

Chronic disseminated candidiasis in stable patients: 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: Until lesions have resolved (usually months) and through periods of immunosuppression

Candida osteoarticular infection: 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: - Osteomyelitis: 6 to 12 months - Septic arthritis: At least 6 weeks

CNS candidiasis (after initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 6 to 12 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: Until all signs/symptoms and CSF and radiologic abnormalities resolve

Candida cardiovascular system infection: 6 to 12 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: - Endocarditis: Lifelong suppressive therapy may be indicated. - Pericarditis or myocarditis: Often several months - Suppurative thrombophlebitis: At least 2 weeks after candidemia cleared - Infected pacemaker, ICD, or VAD: 4 to 6 weeks after device removed; chronic suppressive therapy if VAD not removed

Comments: - Recommended as primary therapy for neonatal candidiasis - Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients: Recommended as primary therapy; an echinocandin is recommended for moderately severe to severe illness or recent azole exposure; switching to this drug after initial echinocandin is appropriate in many cases. - Candidemia in neutropenic patients: Recommended as alternative therapy; an echinocandin or IV amphotericin B preferred for most patients; this drug recommended for patients without recent azole exposure and who are not critically ill. - Recommended as primary therapy for chronic disseminated candidiasis in stable patients, Candida osteoarticular infection, CNS candidiasis, pericarditis/myocarditis, and suppurative thrombophlebitis - Recommended as alternative therapy for endocarditis and infected pacemaker, ICD, or VAD

US CDC, NIH, IDSA, PIDS, and AAP Recommendations for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected Children: Invasive disease in infants and children (all ages): 12 mg/kg IV once a day Maximum dose: 600 mg/dose Duration of therapy: Based on presence of deep-tissue foci and clinical response - Uncomplicated candidemia: At least 2 weeks after last positive blood culture

Secondary prophylaxis: 3 to 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Maximum dose: 200 mg/dose

Comments: - Recommended as alternative therapy in critically ill patients with invasive disease - Recommended as preferred therapy in patients with invasive disease who are not critically ill; this drug should be avoided for Candida krusei and C glabrata. - Secondary prophylaxis may be considered for frequent or severe recurrences of candidiasis; not routinely recommended.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Fungal Infection -- Disseminated:

2 weeks or younger (gestational age 26 to 29 weeks): 6 to 12 mg/kg IV or orally every 72 hours Older than 2 weeks: 6 to 12 mg/kg/day IV or orally

Use: For the treatment of candidemia and disseminated Candida infections

IDSA Recommendations: Neonatal candidiasis: 12 mg/kg IV or orally once a day for at least 3 weeks

Candidemia in nonneutropenic or neutropenic patients: 12 mg/kg IV or orally on the first day followed by 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: - Nonneutropenic patients: 14 days after first negative blood culture and candidemia signs/symptoms resolve - Neutropenic patients: 2 weeks after Candida cleared from bloodstream (documented) and candidemia symptoms and neutropenia resolve

Chronic disseminated candidiasis in stable patients: 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: Until lesions have resolved (usually months) and through periods of immunosuppression

Candida osteoarticular infection: 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: - Osteomyelitis: 6 to 12 months - Septic arthritis: At least 6 weeks

CNS candidiasis (after initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 6 to 12 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: Until all signs/symptoms and CSF and radiologic abnormalities resolve

Candida cardiovascular system infection: 6 to 12 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: - Endocarditis: Lifelong suppressive therapy may be indicated. - Pericarditis or myocarditis: Often several months - Suppurative thrombophlebitis: At least 2 weeks after candidemia cleared - Infected pacemaker, ICD, or VAD: 4 to 6 weeks after device removed; chronic suppressive therapy if VAD not removed

Comments: - Recommended as primary therapy for neonatal candidiasis - Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients: Recommended as primary therapy; an echinocandin is recommended for moderately severe to severe illness or recent azole exposure; switching to this drug after initial echinocandin is appropriate in many cases. - Candidemia in neutropenic patients: Recommended as alternative therapy; an echinocandin or IV amphotericin B preferred for most patients; this drug recommended for patients without recent azole exposure and who are not critically ill. - Recommended as primary therapy for chronic disseminated candidiasis in stable patients, Candida osteoarticular infection, CNS candidiasis, pericarditis/myocarditis, and suppurative thrombophlebitis - Recommended as alternative therapy for endocarditis and infected pacemaker, ICD, or VAD

US CDC, NIH, IDSA, PIDS, and AAP Recommendations for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected Children: Invasive disease in infants and children (all ages): 12 mg/kg IV once a day Maximum dose: 600 mg/dose Duration of therapy: Based on presence of deep-tissue foci and clinical response - Uncomplicated candidemia: At least 2 weeks after last positive blood culture

Secondary prophylaxis: 3 to 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Maximum dose: 200 mg/dose

Comments: - Recommended as alternative therapy in critically ill patients with invasive disease - Recommended as preferred therapy in patients with invasive disease who are not critically ill; this drug should be avoided for Candida krusei and C glabrata. - Secondary prophylaxis may be considered for frequent or severe recurrences of candidiasis; not routinely recommended.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Systemic Candidiasis:

2 weeks or younger (gestational age 26 to 29 weeks): 6 to 12 mg/kg IV or orally every 72 hours Older than 2 weeks: 6 to 12 mg/kg/day IV or orally

Use: For the treatment of candidemia and disseminated Candida infections

IDSA Recommendations: Neonatal candidiasis: 12 mg/kg IV or orally once a day for at least 3 weeks

Candidemia in nonneutropenic or neutropenic patients: 12 mg/kg IV or orally on the first day followed by 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: - Nonneutropenic patients: 14 days after first negative blood culture and candidemia signs/symptoms resolve - Neutropenic patients: 2 weeks after Candida cleared from bloodstream (documented) and candidemia symptoms and neutropenia resolve

Chronic disseminated candidiasis in stable patients: 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: Until lesions have resolved (usually months) and through periods of immunosuppression

Candida osteoarticular infection: 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: - Osteomyelitis: 6 to 12 months - Septic arthritis: At least 6 weeks

CNS candidiasis (after initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 6 to 12 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: Until all signs/symptoms and CSF and radiologic abnormalities resolve

Candida cardiovascular system infection: 6 to 12 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: - Endocarditis: Lifelong suppressive therapy may be indicated. - Pericarditis or myocarditis: Often several months - Suppurative thrombophlebitis: At least 2 weeks after candidemia cleared - Infected pacemaker, ICD, or VAD: 4 to 6 weeks after device removed; chronic suppressive therapy if VAD not removed

Comments: - Recommended as primary therapy for neonatal candidiasis - Candidemia in nonneutropenic patients: Recommended as primary therapy; an echinocandin is recommended for moderately severe to severe illness or recent azole exposure; switching to this drug after initial echinocandin is appropriate in many cases. - Candidemia in neutropenic patients: Recommended as alternative therapy; an echinocandin or IV amphotericin B preferred for most patients; this drug recommended for patients without recent azole exposure and who are not critically ill. - Recommended as primary therapy for chronic disseminated candidiasis in stable patients, Candida osteoarticular infection, CNS candidiasis, pericarditis/myocarditis, and suppurative thrombophlebitis - Recommended as alternative therapy for endocarditis and infected pacemaker, ICD, or VAD

US CDC, NIH, IDSA, PIDS, and AAP Recommendations for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected Children: Invasive disease in infants and children (all ages): 12 mg/kg IV once a day Maximum dose: 600 mg/dose Duration of therapy: Based on presence of deep-tissue foci and clinical response - Uncomplicated candidemia: At least 2 weeks after last positive blood culture

Secondary prophylaxis: 3 to 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Maximum dose: 200 mg/dose

Comments: - Recommended as alternative therapy in critically ill patients with invasive disease - Recommended as preferred therapy in patients with invasive disease who are not critically ill; this drug should be avoided for Candida krusei and C glabrata. - Secondary prophylaxis may be considered for frequent or severe recurrences of candidiasis; not routinely recommended.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Cryptococcal Meningitis -- Immunocompetent Host:

Acute infection: 2 weeks or younger (gestational age 26 to 29 weeks): 6 mg/kg IV or orally every 72 hours Older than 2 weeks: 12 mg/kg IV or orally on the first day followed by 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: 10 to 12 weeks after CSF culture is negative

Comments: - Dose of 12 mg/kg IV or orally once a day may be used in patients older than 2 weeks based on clinical judgment of patient response; this correlates to 12 mg/kg IV or orally every 72 hours in premature newborns during their first 2 weeks of life.

IDSA Recommendations: CNS infection in children: - Consolidation therapy (after induction therapy): 10 to 12 mg/kg orally once a day for 8 weeks - Maintenance therapy: 6 mg/kg orally once a day

Comments: - Preferred agent - Maintenance therapy is recommended to prevent relapse.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Cryptococcal Meningitis -- Immunosuppressed Host:

Acute infection: 2 weeks or younger (gestational age 26 to 29 weeks): 6 mg/kg IV or orally every 72 hours Older than 2 weeks: 12 mg/kg IV or orally on the first day followed by 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: 10 to 12 weeks after CSF culture is negative

Comments: - Dose of 12 mg/kg IV or orally once a day may be used in patients older than 2 weeks based on clinical judgment of patient response; this correlates to 12 mg/kg IV or orally every 72 hours in premature newborns during their first 2 weeks of life.

Suppression of relapse in children with AIDS: 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day

IDSA Recommendations for children: CNS disease: - Consolidation therapy (after induction therapy): 10 to 12 mg/kg/day orally in 2 divided doses for 8 weeks - Maintenance therapy in HIV-infected patients: 6 mg/kg orally once a day

Comments: - Preferred agent - Maintenance therapy is recommended to prevent relapse.

US CDC, NIH, IDSA, PIDS, and AAP Recommendations for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected Children: Acute therapy (induction): 12 mg/kg IV or orally on the first day followed by 10 to 12 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Maximum dose: 800 mg/dose Duration of therapy: At least 2 weeks

Consolidation therapy: 12 mg/kg IV or orally on the first day followed by 10 to 12 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Maximum dose: 800 mg/dose Duration of therapy: At least 8 weeks

Secondary prophylaxis: 6 mg/kg orally once a day Maximum dose: 200 mg/dose Duration of therapy: At least 1 year

Comments: - Recommended in alternative regimens for acute therapy if flucytosine not tolerated or unavailable or amphotericin B-based therapy not tolerated - Recommended as preferred agent for consolidation therapy; should be followed by secondary prophylaxis - Recommended as preferred therapy for secondary prophylaxis

US CDC, NIH, and IDSA Recommendations for HIV-infected Adolescents: - Induction therapy: 400 to 1200 mg IV or orally once a day for at least 2 weeks - Consolidation therapy (after at least 2 weeks successful induction therapy): 400 mg IV or orally once a day for at least 8 weeks - Maintenance therapy: 200 mg orally once a day for at least 1 year

Comments: - Recommended for use in alternative regimens for induction therapy; dose depends on regimen (i. e. used with amphotericin B, flucytosine, or alone). - Recommended as preferred regimen for consolidation therapy; should be followed by maintenance therapy - Recommended as preferred regimen for maintenance therapy

Usual Pediatric Dose for Cryptococcosis:

IDSA Recommendations for children: Disseminated disease: - Consolidation therapy (after induction therapy): 10 to 12 mg/kg/day orally in 2 divided doses for 8 weeks - Maintenance therapy in HIV-infected patients: 6 mg/kg orally once a day

Cryptococcal pneumonia: 6 to 12 mg/kg orally once a day for 6 to 12 months

Comments: - Preferred agent - Maintenance therapy is recommended to prevent relapse.

US CDC, NIH, IDSA, PIDS, and AAP Recommendations for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected Children: Localized disease (including isolated pulmonary disease [non-CNS]), disseminated disease (non-CNS), or severe pulmonary disease: 12 mg/kg IV or orally on the first day followed by 6 to 12 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Maximum dose: 600 mg/dose Duration of therapy: Based on site and severity of infection and clinical response

Secondary prophylaxis: 6 mg/kg orally once a day Maximum dose: 200 mg/dose Duration of therapy: At least 1 year

Comments: - Recommended as preferred therapy for localized disease and secondary prophylaxis - Recommended as alternative therapy for disseminated disease and severe pulmonary disease

US CDC, NIH, and IDSA Recommendations for HIV-infected Adolescents: Non-CNS cryptococcosis with mild to moderate symptoms and focal pulmonary infiltrates: 400 mg orally once a day for 12 months

Non-CNS, extrapulmonary cryptococcosis and diffuse pulmonary disease: - Induction therapy: 400 to 1200 mg IV or orally once a day for at least 2 weeks - Consolidation therapy (after at least 2 weeks successful induction therapy): 400 mg IV or orally once a day for at least 8 weeks - Maintenance therapy: 200 mg orally once a day for at least 1 year

Comments: - Recommended for use in alternative regimens for induction therapy; dose depends on regimen (i. e. used with amphotericin B, flucytosine, or alone). - Recommended as preferred regimen for consolidation therapy; should be followed by maintenance therapy - Recommended as preferred regimen for maintenance therapy

Usual Pediatric Dose for Fungal Infection Prophylaxis:

IDSA Recommendations: Empiric therapy for suspected candidiasis in nonneutropenic or neutropenic patients: 12 mg/kg IV or orally on the first day followed by 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Duration of therapy: - Nonneutropenic patients: Uncertain; should discontinue if cultures and/or serodiagnostic test results negative

Comments: - Suspected candidiasis in nonneutropenic patients: Recommended as primary therapy; an echinocandin is preferred for moderately severe to severe illness or recent azole exposure; patient selection should be based on clinical risk factors, serologic tests, and culture data. - Suspected candidiasis in neutropenic patients: Recommended as alternative therapy; should start empiric therapy after 4 days persistent fever despite antibiotics; serodiagnostic and CT imaging may help; should not use in patients with prior azole prophylaxis.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Candida Urinary Tract Infection:

IDSA Recommendations: - Asymptomatic cystitis in patients undergoing urologic procedures: 3 to 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day for several days before and after the procedure - Symptomatic cystitis: 3 mg/kg IV or orally once a day for 2 weeks - Pyelonephritis: 3 to 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day for 2 weeks - Urinary fungus balls: 3 to 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day until symptoms resolve and urine cultures clear of Candida

Comments: - Recommended as primary therapy - The suggested dose for candidemia is recommended for patients with pyelonephritis and suspected disseminated candidiasis. - Surgical removal of urinary fungus balls strongly recommended in non-neonates.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Coccidioidomycosis -- Meningitis:

US CDC, NIH, IDSA, PIDS, and AAP Recommendations for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected Children: Meningeal infection: 12 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Maximum dose: 800 mg/dose

Secondary prophylaxis: 6 mg/kg orally once a day Maximum dose: 400 mg/dose Duration of therapy: Lifelong

Comments: - Recommended as preferred therapy - Secondary prophylaxis should follow treatment of meningeal infection.

US CDC, NIH, and IDSA Recommendations for HIV-infected Adolescents: - Meningeal infection: 400 to 800 mg IV or orally once a day - Chronic suppressive therapy: 400 mg orally once a day

Comments: - Recommended as preferred therapy for meningeal infection and chronic suppressive therapy - A specialist should be consulted for meningeal infections. - Since relapse is common (80%), suppressive therapy should be lifelong.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Coccidioidomycosis:

US CDC, NIH, IDSA, PIDS, and AAP Recommendations for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected Children: Severe illness with respiratory compromise due to diffuse pulmonary or disseminated nonmeningeal infection: 12 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Maximum dose: 800 mg/dose Duration of therapy: 1 year total

Mild to moderate nonmeningeal infection (e. g. focal pneumonia): 6 to 12 mg/kg IV or orally once a day Maximum dose: 400 mg/dose

Secondary prophylaxis: 6 mg/kg orally once a day Maximum dose: 400 mg/dose Duration of therapy: Lifelong in patients with disseminated disease

Comments: - Recommended as alternative therapy for severe illness with respiratory compromise due to diffuse pulmonary or disseminated nonmeningeal infection; should be followed by secondary prophylaxis - After patient with severe illness with respiratory compromise due to diffuse pulmonary or disseminated nonmeningeal infection is stabilized using the preferred regimen, may switch to fluconazole to complete therapy (total duration: 1 year) - Recommended as preferred therapy for secondary prophylaxis; usually recommended after initial induction therapy for disseminated disease; may also be used after milder disease

US CDC, NIH, and IDSA Recommendations for HIV-infected Adolescents: - Primary prophylaxis: 400 mg orally once a day - Mild infections (e. g. focal pneumonia): 400 mg orally once a day - Severe nonmeningeal infection (diffuse pulmonary or severely ill patients with extrathoracic disseminated disease) - acute phase: 400 mg IV or orally once a day - Chronic suppressive therapy (secondary prophylaxis): 400 mg orally once a day

Comments: - Recommended as preferred therapy for mild infection and chronic suppressive therapy - Recommended as alternative therapy for severe nonmeningeal infection; some experts add a triazole to amphotericin B (preferred therapy) and continue the triazole after amphotericin B is stopped.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Vaginal Candidiasis:

US CDC, NIH, and IDSA Recommendations for HIV-infected Adolescents: - Uncomplicated vulvovaginal candidiasis: 150 mg orally as a single dose - Severe or recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis: 100 to 200 mg orally once a day for at least 7 days - Suppressive therapy for vulvovaginal candidiasis: 150 mg orally once a week

Comments: - Recommended as preferred therapy - Unless frequent or severe recurrences, suppressive therapy generally not recommended

Usual Pediatric Dose for Histoplasmosis:

US CDC, NIH, IDSA, PIDS, and AAP Recommendations for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected Children: Acute primary pulmonary infection: 3 to 6 mg/kg orally once a day Maximum dose: 200 mg/dose

Mild disseminated disease: 5 to 6 mg/kg IV or orally twice a day Maximum dose: 300 mg/dose Duration of therapy: 12 months

Secondary prophylaxis: 3 to 6 mg/kg orally once a day Maximum dose: 200 mg/dose

Comments: - Recommended as alternative therapy

US CDC, NIH, and IDSA Recommendations for HIV-infected Adolescents: - Less severe disseminated infection: 800 mg orally once a day for at least 12 months - Long-term suppressive therapy (secondary prophylaxis): 400 mg orally once a day for more than 1 year

Comments: - Recommended as alternative therapy - This drug should only be used for treatment of less severe disseminated infection in moderately ill patients intolerant of itraconazole.

What other drugs will affect fluconazole?

Certain other drugs can cause unwanted or dangerous effects when used with fluconazole. Your doctor may need to change your treatment plan if you use any of the following drugs:

News Archive, Ranilex

“From a fuel perspective, rail shipment is 3.5 times more efficient than truck shipment,” says Mike Townsend with Railex. “With the same amount of diesel, we can move 3.5 times more product than a road truck,” Townsend added. With most companies nowadays devoting resources to sustainability and setting sustainability goals, Townsend admits that fuel efficiency […]

Eric Sacharski Food Logistics Magazine May 27, 2016

Riverhead, NY—June 27, 2016 — Food Logistics, the only publication exclusively dedicated to covering the movement of product through the global food supply chain, has named Railex as a Top Green Provider for 2016. Food Logistics’ annual Top Green Providers list recognizes companies whose products, services, or exemplary leadership is enhancing sustainability within the food and beverage industry. […]

Lara L. Sowinski, Cool Cargoes editor JOC. com March 06, 2016

Rail logistics providers in North America are moving deeper into the perishables market with new services aimed at shippers looking for dependable and cost­-effective transportation options, particularly for long ­ haul moves. Although falling fuel prices and other factors are contributing to the current softness in the market, it’s full steam ahead for Railex, which partners […]

December 15, 2015

On December 2, 2015, Railex celebrated it’s 9th year in attendance at the New York Produce Show, held at the Javits Center in New York City. Thank you to everyone that stopped by our booth and made the show such a success!

The Railex team was featured on the Produce News website during the PMA fresh Summit in Atlanta Georgia. Lee Brown, Anthony Collella, Chris Cole, Patrick Bruno, Michael Townsend, John Stancati and Steve Russell

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The Guild Complete Megaset Dvd, Megaset

The Guild: Complete Megaset DVD

Description

Product Description

THE GUILD, the pioneering and award-winning web series, is finally available in a complete box set! Follow The Knights of Good, a band of online video game players, who are addicted to a fictitious MMORPG (Massively Multi-Player Role Playing Game). Codex (Felicia Day), recently dumped by both her boyfriend and therapist, is completely thrown when her Guild member Zaboo (Sandeep Parikh) shows up on her doorstep. This sets off a chain reaction that brings all the Guildies together offline for the first time. They include Clara (Robin Thorsen), whose gaming comes before the needs of her husband and kids; Tink (Amy Okuda), the secretive college student who keeps people at arms' length with lethal barbs both on and offline; Bladezz (Vincent Caso), a self-proclaimed ladies' man who's barely out of puberty; and the hilariously intractable and infamously frugal Guild Leader Vork (Jeff Lewis).

Follow the Guildies through six seasons, from pirate-themed burger joint exploits, to a gaming convention road trip, and even INTO the video game! The Guild must stay strong through it all, even as a rival Guild, Axis of Anarchy, headed by their leader, Fawkes (Wil Wheaton), threatens to take them down. Included in this set are all the show's iconic music videos, behind the scenes for every season, full scripts and more! Highlighting the best of Geek culture, including a slew of recognizable fan favorites (like Simon Helbig, Nathan Fillion and Stan Lee), THE GUILD is one of the most innovative and hilarious web series to date.

About this item

Augbactam 1g, Augbactam

AUGBACTAM 1g

Acid Clauvulanic 125mg

- Nhi?m khu?n du?ng hô h?p trên: viêm amidan, viêm xoang, viêm tai gi?a dã du?c di?u tr? b?ng các kháng sinh thông thu?ng nhung không gi?m.

- Nhi?m khu?n du?ng hô h?p du?i b?i các ch?ng H. influenza và Branhamella catarrbalis s?n sinh Beta – lactamase: viêm ph? qu?n c?p và mãn, viêm ph?i – ph? qu?n.

- Nhi?m khu?n du?ng ti?t ni?u – sinh d?c b?i các ch?ng E. coli, Klebsiella và Enterrobacter s?n sinh Beta – lactamase: viêm bàng quang, viêm ni?u d?o, viêm b? th?n (nhi?m khu?n du?ng sinh d?c n?).

- Nhi?m khu?n da và mô m?m: m?n nh?t, áp xe, nhi?m khu?n v?t thuong.

- Nhi?m khu?n xuong và kh?p: viêm t?y xuong.

- Nhi?m khu?n nha khoa: áp xe ? rang.

- Nhi?m khu?n khác: s?n ph? khoa, ? b?ng.

Li?u lu?ng và cách dùng:

- Ngu?i l?n và tr? em > 12 tu?i có tr?ng lu?ng > 40kg: 1 viên (1000mg) cách 8 gi?/1 l?n.

- Di?u tr? không du?c vu?t quá 14 ngày mà không khám l?i.

- M?n c?m v?i b?t k? thành ph?n nào c?a thu?c.

Tác d?ng không mong mu?n:

- Thu?ng g?p: tiêu ch?y, ngo?i ban, ng?a

- Ít g?p: tang b?ch c?u ái toan, bu?n nôn, nôn, viêm da và vàng da ? m?t, tang transaminase.

- Hi?m g?p: ph?n ?ng ph?n v?, phù Quincke, gi?m nh? ti?u c?u, gi?m b?ch c?u, thi?u máu tan máu, viêm d?i tràng gi? m?c, h?i ch?ng Stevens-Johnson, ban d? da d?ng, viêm da bong, ho?i t? bi?u bì do ng? d?c, viêm th?n k?.

- Thông báo cho th?y thu?c các tác d?ng không mong mu?n g?p ph?i khi dùng thu?c.

- Noi khô mát, tránh ánh n?ng tr?c ti?p, nhi?t d? du?i 30 o C.

Thông tin ch? mang tính tham kh?o, nên dùng thu?c theo ch? d?nh c?a bác si ho?c tuân theo hu?ng d?n c?a Du?c s? D?i h?c, thu?c kháng sinh nên u?ng d? li?u, tránh vi sinh v?t d? kháng thu?c.

Augbactam 1g/200mg

Khang sinh tiem

A18

Ch? D?nh

AUGBACTAM dung d? di?u tr? trong th?i gian ng?n cac tru?ng h?p nhi?m khu?n sau: – Nhi?m khu?n du?ng ho h?p tren: viem Amidan, viem xoang, viem tai gi?a da du?c di?u tr? b?ng cac khang sinh thong thu?ng nhung khong gi?m. – Nhi?m khu?n du?ng ho h?p du?i b?i cac ch?ng H. influenzae va Branhamella catarrhalis s?n sinh beta – lactamase: viem ph? qu?n c?p va man, viem ph?i – ph? qu?n. – Nhi?m khu?n n?ng du?ng ti?t ni?u – sinh d?c b?i cac ch?ng E. coli . Klebsiella va Enterobacter s?n sinh beta – lactamase: viem bang quang, viem ni?u d?o, viem b? th?n (nhi?m khu?n du?ng sinh d?c n?). – Nhi?m khu?n da va mo m?m: m?n nh?t, ap xe, nhi?m khu?n v?t thuong. – Nhi?m khu?n xuong va kh?p: viem t?y xuong. – Nhi?m khu?n nha khoa: ap xe ? rang. – Nhi?m khu?n khac: s?n ph? khoa, ? b?ng. AUGBACTAM tiem tinh m?ch cung du?c ch? d?nh trong nhi?m khu?n mau, viem phuc m?c, nhi?m khu?n sau ph?u thu?t, d? phong nhi?m khu?n trong khi ph?u thu?t d? day – ru?t, t? cung, d?u va c?, tim, th?n, thay kh?p va du?ng m?t.

Dong goi

H?p 10 l? thu?c b?t pha tiem. H?p 1 l? thu?c b?t pha tiem.

Cong th?c

– Amoxicillin sodium tuong duong Amoxicillin. 1 g – Potassium clavulanate tuong duong Acid clavulanic. 200 mg

Du?c l?c h?c

S? ph?i h?p Amoxicillin v?i Acid clavulanic trong AUGBACTAM giup cho Amoxicillin khong b? cac beta – lactamase pha h?y, d?ng th?i m? r?ng them ph? khang khu?n c?a Amoxicillin m?t cach hi?u qu? d?i v?i nhi?u vi khu?n da khang l?i Amoxicillin, cac Penicillin khac va cac Cephalosporin. AUGBACTAM co tac d?ng len ph?n l?n cac vi khu?n: · Gram duong: Hi?u khi: Streptococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus viridans, Staphylococcus aureus, Corynebacterium, Bacillus anthracis, Listeria monocytogenes . K? khi: cac loai Clostridium, Peptococcus, Peptostreptococcus. · Gram am: Hi?u khi: Haemophilus influenzae, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, cac loai Klebsiella, Salmonella, Shigella, Bordetella, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Neisseria meningitidis, Vibrio cholerae, Pasteurella multocida. K? khi: cac loai Bacteroides k? c? B. fragilis.

Du?c d?ng h?c

Du?c d?ng h?c c?a hai thanh ph?n Amoxicillin va Clavulanate trong AUGBACTAM g?n nhu tuong t? nhau. C? hai d?u lien k?t v?i huy?t thanh ? m?c th?p. Kho?ng 70% ? d?ng t? do trong huy?t thanh. Tang g?p doi li?u AUGBACTAM cung lam tang kho?ng g?p doi n?ng d? d?t du?c trong huy?t thanh.

Ch?ng ch? d?nh

– M?n c?m v?i nhom Beta – lactam (cac Penicillin, Cephalosporin). – Nh?ng ngu?i co ti?n s? vang da ho?c r?i lo?n gan m?t do dung Amoxicillin, Clavulanate hay cac Penicillin.

Tac d?ng ph?

– Thu?ng g?p: Tieu ch?y, ngo?i ban, ng?a. – It g?p: Tang b?ch c?u ai toan, bu?n non, non, viem gan va vang da ? m?t, tang transaminase. – Hi?m g?p: Ph?n ?ng ph?n v?, phu Quincke, gi?m nh? ti?u c?u, gi?m b?ch c?u, thi?u mau tan huy?t, viem d?i trang gi? m?c, h?i ch?ng Stevens – Johnson, ban d? da d?ng, viem da bong, ho?i t? bi?u bi do ng? d?c, viem th?n k?. – Thong bao cho bac s? nh?ng tac d?ng khong mong mu?n g?p ph?i khi s? d?ng thu?c.

Th?n tr?ng

– D?i v?i nh?ng ngu?i b?nh co bi?u hi?n r?i lo?n ch?c nang gan, suy th?n. – D?i v?i nh?ng ngu?i b?nh co ti?n s? qua m?n v?i cac Penicillin co th? co ph?n ?ng n?ng hay t? vong. – Dung thu?c keo dai doi khi lam phat tri?n cac vi khu?n khang thu?c. – Khi tiem tinh m?ch li?u cao c?n duy tri can b?ng lu?ng d?ch xu?t nh?p d? gi?m thi?u hi?n tu?ng s?i – ni?u. Ph?i ki?m tra thu?ng xuyen cac ?ng thong bang quang d? tranh hi?n tu?ng k?t t?a gay t?c khi co n?ng d? ch? ph?m cao trong nu?c ti?u ? nhi?t d? thu?ng. TH?I K? MANG THAI – CHO CON BU: – Tranh s? d?ng AUGBACTAM cho ngu?i mang thai nh?t la trong 3 thang d?u, tr? tru?ng h?p c?n thi?t do bac s? ch? d?nh. – Trong th?i k? cho con bu co th? dung AUGBACTAM. Thu?c khong gay h?i cho tr? dang bu m? tr? khi co nguy co b? m?n c?m do co m?t lu?ng r?t nh? thu?c trong s?a.

Tuong tac

– Thu?c co th? gay keo dai th?i gian ch?y mau va th?i gian prothrombin. Vi v?y c?n ph?i c?n th?n d?i v?i nh?ng ngu?i b?nh dang di?u tr? b?ng thu?c ch?ng dong mau. – Thu?c co th? lam gi?m hi?u qu? thu?c tranh thai u?ng, do do c?n ph?i bao tru?c cho ngu?i b?nh. – Probenecid keo dai th?i gian dao th?i c?a Amoxicillin nhung khong ?nh hu?ng d?n s? dao th?i c?a Acid clavulanic. – D? tranh tuong k? v?t ly co th? x?y ra, khong du?c pha AUGBACTAM v?i cac dung d?ch co ch?a Glucose, Sodium bicarbonate ho?c Dextran. Khong nen tr?n thu?c trong cung bom tiem ho?c binh tiem truy?n v?i m?t thu?c khac, nh?t la Corticosteroid ho?c Aminoglycoside. – Thu?c tuong k? v?i Hydrocortisone succinate, dung d?ch acid amin, d?ch th?y phan protein, nhu d?ch lipid, Neosynephrine hydrochloride, dung d?ch Manitol. QUA LI?U: Khi dung qua li?u, thu?c it gay ra tai bi?n vi du?c dung n?p t?t ngay c? ? li?u cao. Nh?ng ph?n ?ng c?p x?y ra ph? thu?c vao tinh tr?ng qua m?n c?a t?ng ca th?. Nguy co la tang potassium huy?t khi dung li?u r?t cao vi Acid clavulanic du?c dung du?i d?ng mu?i potassium. Co th? dung phuong phap th?m phan mau d? lo?i thu?c ra kh?i h? tu?n hoan.

H?n dung

2 nam k? t? ngay s?n xu?t

B?o qu?n

Noi kho (d? ?m ? 70%), nhi?t d? ? 30 o C, tranh anh sang.

Cach dung

Li?u dung: Li?u lu?ng du?c bi?u th? du?i d?ng Amoxicillin trong h?p ch?t. S? d?ng AUGBACTAM 1g/200mg cho ngu?i l?n va tr? em tren 12 tu?i theo ch? d?nh c?a bac s?. Khong du?c vu?t qua 200 mg Acid clavulanic cho m?i l?n tiem. – Li?u thu?ng dung: tiem tinh m?ch r?t ch?m ho?c tiem truy?n nhanh 1g/l?n, c? 8 gi? tiem 1 l?n. Tru?ng h?p nhi?m khu?n n?ng hon, co th? ho?c tang li?u tiem (c? 6 gi? tiem 1 l?n) ho?c tang li?u len t?i 6 g/ngay. – Li?u thu?ng dung trong d? phong ph?u thu?t: s? d?ng AUGBACTAM tiem tinh m?ch vao luc gay ti?n me. Nh?ng ca ph?u thu?t co nguy co nhi?m khu?n cao (ph?u thu?t k?t – tr?c trang), co th? ph?i c?n 3 d?n 4 li?u AUGBACTAM trong vong 24 gi? (thu?ng la vao cac th?i di?m 0, 8, 16, 24 gi?). Co th? ph?i ti?p t?c tiem nhu v?y trong vai ngay n?u nguy co nhi?m khu?n tang len. – C?n ph?i di?u ch?nh li?u lu?ng trong tru?ng h?p suy th?n trung binh va n?ng nhu b?ng sau:

Suy th?n nh?

25 mg/kg m?i 24 gi?

– Th?m phan mau: ?Ngu?i l?n: li?u ban d?u 1g, sau do 500 mg m?i 24 gi?, them 1 li?u b? sung 500 mg sau khi th?m phan. ?Tr? em: 25 mg/kg m?i 24 gi?, them 1 li?u b? sung 12,5 mg/kg sau khi th?m phan, ti?p sau do la 25 mg/kg m?i 24 gi?. Cach dung: – Ph?i pha thu?c v?i nu?c c?t pha tiem ho?c dung d?ch pha tiem Sodium chloride 0,9%. D? tiem truy?n, co th? dung cac dung d?ch tiem truy?n Sodium lactate (M/6), Ringer ho?c Hartmann. – D? b?n c?a dung d?ch ch? ph?m ph? thu?c theo n?ng d?. Vi v?y sau khi pha, ph?i dung ngay. Th? tich pha va th?i h?n dung nhu sau (va ph?i theo dung):

Th? tich pha (ml)

G?i email

Prostarin Reviews - Ingredients - Does It Really Work, Prostarinol

Overall Review: 3 out of 5. Prostarin aims to help men who are having prostate problems – or for men who are looking for a supplement to serve as a preventative measure. Prostate cancer and enlarged prostates can affect men of any age, especially men in their 50s and 60s.

They set out to help by including Saw Palmetto as a main ingredient in their formula. The berries of this versatile plant contain Beta Sitosterol, easily one of the most common herbal treatments for prostate problems. Many herbalists worldwide swear by Beta Sitosterol for easing problems like nighttime urination – a condition in which men wake up during normal sleep times to use the bathroom. This can happen multiple times a night, and can make life very difficult. Beta Sitosterol also may help regulate the flow of urine, as many men with enlarged prostates can face a problem with stop-start urination.

Saw Palmetto is also found in other formulas that address different aspects of men’s health. It is commonly found in formulas to treat erectile dysfunction and low libido – as well as in many shampoos and tonics meant to treat male pattern baldness and hair loss.

Zinc is also found in Prostarin. This mineral is thought to help the production of semen, making better-quality semen as well as creating more of it. The prostate itself contains a large deposit of zinc, which is why many men turn to zinc supplements to keep it at a functioning level.

Users are directed to take one pill two times a day, preferably in the morning and at night – with a full glass of water. Benefits: – may help regulate urination – contains zinc, which is an important mineral

Negatives: – short ingredient list – requires some dedication Ingredients: – Saw Palmetto – Zinc – Vitamin A – Vitamin E – Garlic – Bee Pollen – Pygeum Africanum

Please contact us if this information is incorrect.

Please feel free to share your comments or leave your own review on Prostarin below.

Trademark Disclaimer

Product names, logos, brands, and other trademarks featured or referred to within the ManRelated. com are the property of their respective trademark holders. ManRelated. com does not offer medical advice or treatment. Our content is for informational purposes and is also user generated.

FTC Earnings Disclaimer

We receive free samples and promotions from some of the products we review. We are never paid to do a review. We may create links to products or advertisements where we are paid commission from any sales. We do accept product reviews from third parties or consumers and have no control over their compensation or views. ManRelated. com also distributes products by Vitamin Boat®, Nature's Way®, Herbalcom®, and more.

FDA Disclaimer

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Comprar Barato Online Droxilon, Droxilon

Comprar Droxilon

Medicamentos droxilon (cefadroxil) Uterus bicornis kann eine Profilax nach Stra?mann durchgefuhrt werden: Hierbei wird das mediane Septum gespalten, die beiden Uterushalften werden vereinigt. Die Indikation wird allerdings sehr zuruckhaltend gestellt.

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Articulos de interes:

Buscar/Search/Chercher:

Donde/Where/Ou

Bendit, planchas de asar.

Mosen Cinto Verdaguer, 3 25100 Almacelles (Lleida) Tel. (34) 973 26 93 96 bendit@bendit. es www. bendit. es

Noroxin - Man S Health, Negalflex

Product Description Common use Noroxin is quinolone antibiotic used for treatment of urinary tract such as pyelonephritis, cystitis, urethritis), genitals (prostatitis, cervicitis, endometritis), gastrointestinal tract (salmonellosis, shigellosis), uncomplicated gonorrhea. Mechanism of its action consists in inhibition of DNA gyrase leading to destabilization of the bacterial DNA and death of the susceptible bacteria. Noroxin is active against Staphylococcus spp. (including Staphylococcus aureus), Neisseria spp. E. coli, Citrobacter spp. Klebsiella spp. Proteus spp. Salmonella spp. Enterobacter spp. Hafnia, Shigella spp. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Vibrio cholerae, Haemophilus influenzae, Chlamydia spp. Mycoplasma spp. and some others. Medication is active for 12 hours.

Dosage and directions To treat infections of urinary tract, take 400 mg of Noroxin two times a day during 7-10 days, to treat non-complicated cystitis treatment continues 3-7 days, and in patients with recurrent chronic infection of urinary tract it is up to 12 weeks. For prostatitis the recommended daily dose is 800 mg, divided into 2 doses, for four weeks. Usual single recommended dose to treat gonorrhea is 800 milligrams for 1 day. The maximal daily dose is 800 milligrams. Take with a full glass of water two hours after a meal or one hour before it. Drink plenty of water while taking Noroxin to avoid formation of needle-shaped crystals in your urine. The elderly and people with kidney problems may need to use a reduced dosage or have their kidney function monitored. Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not start or stop treatment without your doctor's permission.

Precautions In elderly and patients with kidney impairment, kidney function monitoring is required on a regular basis. This medication may cause photosensibilization, avoid direct sun rays during treatment. Limit consummation of alcoholic beverages as they may worsen such side effects as dizziness, drowsiness and others which may affect your ability to operate machinery and driving.

Contraindications This medication cannot be administered in patients with hypersensitivity to Noroxin, pregnant and breastfeeding women, children under 18 y. o. individuals with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. Caution is required when Noroxin is administered in individuals with cerebral arteriosclerosis, cerebrovascular dysfunctions, epilepsy, epileptic syndrome, Myasthenia gravis, kidney or liver failure.

Possible side effect The most common side effects include: weakness, headache, drowsiness, dizziness, nausea, stomach upset. Rare but serious side effects are: tremor and sun sensitivity, seizures, mental/mood changes, sore throat/fever, vision changes, hearing loss, change in amount or appearance of urine, jaundice, fainting, changes in heartbeat, easy bruising or bleeding, numbness or tingling of extremities. Tendon damage and weakening of muscles is rare but possible. Stop exercising and claim prompt medical attention if you experience pain in your joint or tendon. In case of pseudomembranous colitis (persistent diarrhea, abdominal or stomach pain/cramping, blood/mucus in your stool) which may develop even a few weeks after the treatment was discontinued, do not use anti-diarrhea products or narcotic pain medications. Tell your doctor immediately about your condition. Prolonged or repeated used of Noroxin may cause oral thrush or a new vaginal yeast infection with such symptoms as: white patches in the mouth, a change in vaginal discharge. Inform your doctor immediately if you experience allergic reaction (severe dizziness, rash, itching, swelling, trouble breathing).

Drug interaction Theophylline dose should be decreased while on Noroxin. Noroxin increases the blood concentration of indirect anticoagulants, cyclosporine, decreases effects of nitrofurans. Antacids which contain ions of Al and Mg, medications which contain Fe, Zn2+, sucralfate should be taken at least with four hour interval with Noroxin. Concomitant intake with the medicines decreasing epileptic threshold may lead to epileptic attacks. Dangerous sudden drop in blood pressure or changes in heart rhythm are possible when Noroxin is concomitantly used with the drugs for blood pressure or affecting the heart rhythm. Inform your doctor about all prescribed and over-the-counter medications and herbal products you are taking.

Missed dose If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember unless it is almost time of your next dose. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose and return dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to make up the missed dose.

Overdose Symptoms of overdose include: dizziness, nausea, vomiting, drowsiness, "cold" sweating, puffy face without major changes in hemodynamic indices.

Storage Store at room temperature in a tight container, away from moisture and humidity.

Disclaimer We provide only general information about medications which does not cover all directions, possible drug integrations, or precautions. Information at the site cannot be used for self-treatment and self-diagnosis. Any specific instructions for a particular patient should be agreed with your health care adviser or doctor in charge of the case. We disclaim reliability of this information and mistakes it could contain. We are not responsible for any direct, indirect, special or other indirect damage as a result of any use of the information on this site and also for consequences of self-treatment.

Rabeprazole Indications, Side Effects, Warnings, Rabeprazol

Rabeprazole

Rabeprazole is used for:

Treating heartburn or irritation of the esophagus caused by gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It may be used for short-term treatment of ulcers of the small intestine. It may be used with certain antibiotics to treat ulcers of the small intestine and to help prevent them from coming back. It may be used to treat conditions that cause your body to make too much stomach acid (eg, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome). It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Rabeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor. It works by decreasing the amount of acid produced in the stomach.

Do NOT use rabeprazole if:

you are allergic to any ingredient in rabeprazole or to similar medicines (eg, omeprazole)

you are taking atazanavir, dasatinib, erlotinib, or rilpivirine

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using rabeprazole:

Some medical conditions may interact with rabeprazole. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding

if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement

if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances

if you have low blood potassium or magnesium levels, liver problems, or stomach or bowel cancer

if you have osteoporosis (weak bones), a family history of osteoporosis, or other risk factors of osteoporosis (eg, smoking, poor nutrition)

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with rabeprazole. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Diuretics (eg, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide) because the risk of low blood magnesium levels may be increased

Anticoagulants (eg, warfarin), cyclosporine, diazepam, digoxin, methotrexate, phenytoin, raltegravir, risedronate, saquinavir, theophylline, or tolterodine because the risk of their side effects may be increased by rabeprazole

Atazanavir, bosutinib, clopidogrel, dasatinib, erlotinib, indinavir, iron, itraconazole, ketoconazole, mycophenolate, nelfinavir, nilotinib, posaconazole, rilpivirine, or sorafenib because their effectiveness may be decreased by rabeprazole

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if rabeprazole may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use rabeprazole:

Use rabeprazole as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Rabeprazole comes with an extra patient information sheet called a Medication Guide. Read it carefully. Read it again each time you get rabeprazole refilled.

Take rabeprazole by mouth with or without food.

Swallow rabeprazole whole. Do not break, crush, or chew before swallowing.

Tell your doctor if you cannot swallow tablets whole. You may need a different medicine.

You may take antacids while you are taking rabeprazole if you are directed to do so by your doctor.

Continue to take rabeprazole even if you feel well. Do not miss any doses.

If you miss a dose of rabeprazole, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use rabeprazole.

Important safety information:

Contact your doctor if you have any symptoms of a bleeding ulcer, such as black, tarry stools or vomit that looks like coffee grounds, or if you experience throat pain, chest pain, severe stomach pain, or trouble swallowing.

Do NOT change your dose, stop taking rabeprazole, or take rabeprazole for longer than prescribed without checking with your doctor.

Rabeprazole may increase the risk of a serious form of diarrhea. Contact your doctor right away if stomach pain or cramps, severe or persistent diarrhea, or bloody or watery stools occur. Discuss any questions or concerns with your doctor.

Rabeprazole may increase the risk of hip, wrist, and spine fractures in patients with weak bones (osteoporosis). The risk may be greater if you use rabeprazole in high doses, for long periods of time, or if you are older than 50 years old. Contact your doctor if you have any questions about this information.

Low blood magnesium levels have been reported rarely in patients taking proton pump inhibitors for at least 3 months. In most cases, this effect was seen after a year of treatment. If you will be taking rabeprazole for a long time, or if you take certain other medicines (eg, digoxin, diuretics), your doctor may perform lab tests to check for low blood magnesium levels. Seek medical attention right away if you experience symptoms of low blood magnesium levels (eg, dizziness; fast or irregular heartbeat; involuntary muscle movements; jitteriness or tremors; muscle aches, cramps, pain, spasms, or weakness; seizures).

Check with your doctor to see whether you should take a calcium and vitamin D supplement while you use rabeprazole.

Tell your doctor or dentist that you take rabeprazole before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery.

Use rabeprazole with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially hip, wrist, and spine fractures.

Rabeprazole should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN younger than 12 years old; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed.

PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using rabeprazole while you are pregnant. It is not known if rabeprazole is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while taking rabeprazole.

Possible side effects of rabeprazole:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Constipation; gas; headache; mild diarrhea; mild sore throat.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest or throat; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue; unusual hoarseness); bloody or watery stools; bone pain; chest pain; dizziness; fainting; fast or irregular heartbeat; fever, chills, or persistent sore throat; involuntary muscle movements; joint or muscle aches or pain; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin; seizures; severe or persistent diarrhea, nausea, or vomiting; severe or persistent stomach or back pain; stomach cramps; swelling of the hands, ankles, or feet; symptoms of liver problems (eg, dark urine, loss of appetite, pale stools, unusual nausea, yellowing of the skin or eyes); tremors; unexplained weight loss; unusual bruising or bleeding; unusual tiredness or weakness; vision changes.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA .

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center. or emergency room immediately.

Proper storage of rabeprazole:

Store rabeprazole at room temperature, between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep rabeprazole out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information:

If you have any questions about rabeprazole, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Rabeprazole is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people.

If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor.

Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take rabeprazole or any other medicine. Only your health care provider has the knowledge and training to decide which medicines are right for you. This information does not endorse any medicine as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a brief summary of general information about rabeprazole. It does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to rabeprazole. This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from your health care provider. You must talk with your healthcare provider for complete information about the risks and benefits of using rabeprazole.

Review Date: August 8, 2016

Database Edition 13.4.1.001

Copyright © 2013 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc.

Disclaimer: This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take this medicine or any other medicine. Only your health care provider has the knowledge and training to decide which medicines are right for you. This information does not endorse any medicine as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a brief summary of general information about this medicine. It does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to this medicine. This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from your health care provider. You must talk with your healthcare provider for complete information about the risks and benefits of using this medicine.

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Powered by the Music Genome Project®, the most comprehensive music analysis ever undertaken, Pandora gives you personalized radio that plays what you love and continually evolves with your tastes.

• Create personalized stations from songs, artists, genres, or comedians • Browse hundreds of curated genre stations to find the perfect match for your mood or activity • Create an account and listen on desktop, mobile, TVs and home devices, or in your car • Listen ad-free with Pandora One for only $4.99/mo.

Note: Pandora may use large amounts of data, and carrier data charges may apply. For best results, we recommend you connect your device to trusted Wi-Fi networks when available

Работает на Music Genome Project®, самый всесторонний анализ музыки когда-либо проводившихся, Pandora дает вам персонализированный радио, которое играет то, что вы любите и постоянно развивается вместе с вашими вкусами.

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Примечание: Pandora может использовать большие объемы данных, и может взимать плату за передачу данных. Для достижения наилучших результатов, мы рекомендуем вам подключить устройство к доверенной сети Wi-Fi при наличии

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Перевести описание на Русский с помощью Google Переводчика? Перевести на Английский

Описание

Powered by the Music Genome Project®, the most comprehensive music analysis ever undertaken, Pandora gives you personalized radio that plays what you love and continually evolves with your tastes.

• Create personalized stations from songs, artists, genres, or comedians • Browse hundreds of curated genre stations to find the perfect match for your mood or activity • Create an account and listen on desktop, mobile, TVs and home devices, or in your car • Listen ad-free with Pandora One for only $4.99/mo.

Note: Pandora may use large amounts of data, and carrier data charges may apply. For best results, we recommend you connect your device to trusted Wi-Fi networks when available

Работает на Music Genome Project®, самый всесторонний анализ музыки когда-либо проводившихся, Pandora дает вам персонализированный радио, которое играет то, что вы любите и постоянно развивается вместе с вашими вкусами.

• Создание персонализированных станций из песен, исполнителей, жанров или комиков • Обзор сотни Куратор жанровых станций, чтобы найти идеально подходят для вашего настроения или деятельности • Создать учетную запись и слушать на настольных, мобильных, телевизоров и домашних устройств, или в вашем автомобиле • Слушайте без рекламы с Pandora One всего за $ 4,99 / мес.

Примечание: Pandora может использовать большие объемы данных, и может взимать плату за передачу данных. Для достижения наилучших результатов, мы рекомендуем вам подключить устройство к доверенной сети Wi-Fi при наличии

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Lesidas [in more detail]

For the relief of nasal and non-nasal symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis and for the treatment of chronic idiopathic urticaria in patients 2 years of age or older

Lesidas Mechanism Of Action:

Like other H 1 - blockers, loratadine competes with free histamine for binding at H 1 - receptors in the GI tract, uterus, large blood vessels, and bronchial muscle. Lesidas also has a weak affinity for acetylcholine and alpha-adrenergic receptors.

Lesidas Drug Interactions:

Nefazodone Increased risk of cardiotoxicity

Food Interactions:

Take on empty stomach: 1 hour before or 2 hours after meals.

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Brand name of Corbinal is Corbinal.

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Corbinal (Lamisil) Storage

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Corbinal (Lamisil) Frequently asked questions

Q: What is the important Corbinal information?

A: Corbinal is a high-quality medicine which is taken in treatment of fungal infections of the toenail and fingernail. Do not take Corbinal in case of allergy to this medicine or to its ingredients. Try to be careful using Corbinal if you take antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil), amoxapine (Asendin), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Adapin, Sinequan), imipramine (Tofranil), nortriptyline (Aventyl, Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), and trimipramine (Surmontil); beta-blockers such as atenolol (Tenormin), labetalol (Normodyne), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (Corgard), and propranolol (Inderal); cimetidine (Tagamet); medications that suppress the immune system such as azathioprine (Imuran), cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune), methotrexate (Rheumatrex), sirolimus (Rapamune), and tacrolimus (Prograf); rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane); and selegiline (Eldepryl), anticoagulants (blood thinners) such as warfarin (Coumadin). Corbinal cannot be taken if you're pregnant or you plan to have a baby, or you are a nursing mother. It can be dangerous to use Corbinal if you suffer from or have a history of kidney or liver disease, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), kidney or liver disease.

Q: What are Corbinal side effects?

A: Corbinal has its common side effects such as: stomach pain, pruritus, diarrhea, dyspepsia, changes in taste or loss of taste. But in case of rejection of Corbinal ingredients you can experience more serious side effects: dyspepsia that does not go away, decreased appetite, extreme tiredness, vomiting, dark urine, pale stools, sore throat, signs of infection, pain in the right upper part of the stomach, symptoms of allergy (difficulties with breathing, swelling, skin rash or hives), high temperature.

Q: What are generic and brand names of Corbinal?

A: Brand name of Corbinal is Corbinal. Generic name of Corbinal is Terbinafine.

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Pulmicort enthalt Budesonid, die ein Corticosteroid ist. Budesonid verhindert die Freisetzung von Stoffen im Korper, die die Entzundung verursachen.

Pulmicort wird verwendet, um Asthmaanfalle zu verhindern. Es wird nicht behandeln einen Asthmaanfall, die bereits begonnen hat. Es funktioniert durch eine Verringerung Reizung und Schwellung in den Atemwegen, die zu kontrollieren oder zu verhindern Asthma-Symptome hilft.

Pulmicort kann auch fur andere Zwecke als die aufgefuhrten verwendet werden.

Verwenden Sie Pulmicort genau wie es Ihnen verschrieben wurde. Verwenden Sie nicht die Medikamente in gro?eren Mengen, oder verwenden Sie es fur langer als empfohlen von Ihrem Arzt. Befolgen Sie die Anweisungen auf dem Etikett Verschreibung.

Verwenden Sie keine Pulmicort einen Asthmaanfall, die bereits begonnen hat, zu behandeln. Es wird nicht schnell genug arbeiten, um Ihre Symptome ruckgangig zu machen. Verwenden Sie nur ein schnell wirkendes Einatmen Medizin einen Asthma-Anfall zu behandeln.

Pulmicort wird mit Patienten-Anweisungen fur die sichere und wirksame Anwendung und Anweisungen zum Grundieren Sie den Inhalator Gerat. Befolgen Sie diese Anweisungen sorgfaltig. Fragen Sie Ihren Arzt oder Apotheker, wenn Sie irgendwelche Fragen haben.

Um die Wahrscheinlichkeit der Entwicklung einer Pilzinfektion im Mund zu reduzieren, spulen Sie den Mund mit Wasser nach der Verwendung von Pulmicort. Wenn Sie einen Zerstauber mit einer Gesichtsmaske, waschen Sie die Maske Bereich des Gesichts nach jedem Gebrauch.

Wenn Sie auch ein Steroid Medikamente, nicht aufhoren mit dem Steroid plotzlich oder Sie konnen unangenehme Entzugserscheinungen haben. Sprechen Sie mit Ihrem Arzt uber die Einnahme weniger der Steroid vor dem Anhalten vollstandig.

Fragen Sie Ihren Arzt, wenn Ihr Asthma-Symptome nicht nach der Verwendung von Pulmicort fur 2 Wochen bessern.

Asthma ist in der Regel mit einer Kombination von verschiedenen Medikamenten behandelt. Am besten behandeln Ihre Bedingung, verwenden Sie alle Ihre Medikamente, wie von Ihrem Arzt verordnet wurde. Andern Sie nicht Ihre Dosis oder Medikamenten Zeitplan ohne Beratung durch Ihren Arzt.

Ihre Dosierung Bedurfnisse konnen sich andern, wenn Sie eine Operation haben, krank sind, unter Stress stehen, oder kurzlich hatten einen Asthmaanfall. Sprechen Sie mit Ihrem Arzt, wenn Sie Ihre Asthma-Medikamente scheinen nicht so gut zu funktionieren Behandlung oder Vorbeugung von Asthmaanfallen.

Rufen Sie Ihren Arzt sofort, wenn Sie glauben, dass Pulmicort Ihr Zustand verschlimmert. Wenn es wie Sie mehr von einem Ihrer Medikamente in einer 24-Stunden-Zeitraum verwenden mussen scheint, mit Ihrem Arzt sprechen.

Um sicher zu sein Pulmicort ist nicht die schadliche Wirkungen verursacht, wird Ihr Arzt brauchen, um Ihre Fortschritte regelma?ig zu uberprufen. Verpassen Sie keine Termine geplant.

Mit einem Steroid kann die Blut-Zellen, die Ihren Korper der Bekampfung von Infektionen. Dies kann es fur Sie einfacher zu krank werden, mit anderen, die krank sind.

Bewahren Sie Pulmicort bei Raumtemperatur weg von Feuchtigkeit und Hitze. Bewahren Sie die Abdeckung auf dem Inhalationsgerat zwar nicht in Gebrauch ist.

Halten Sie den Streifen von Pulmicort Respules in der Folie Umschlag, vor Licht geschutzt, bis Sie bereit sind, die Medikamente zu verwenden sind. Nach Abrei?en einer Ampulle, kehren Sie den Streifen auf dem Umschlag, um die restlichen Ampullen vor Licht zu schutzen. Bewahren Sie die Folienumhullung aufrecht. Sobald Sie eroffnet einen Umschlag haben, mussen Sie die Ampullen innerhalb von 2 Wochen zu verwenden.

Die Pulmicort Flexhaler Gerat verfugt Indikatormarkierungen um Ihnen zu zeigen, wie viele Dosen sind innen links. Diese Dosis-counter Markierungen zeigen Schritten von 20 Dosen. Der Indikator kann nicht scheinen sich zu bewegen, bis etwa 5 Dosen verwendet wurden.

> Verwenden Sie keine zusatzliche Dosis ist, gerade weil die Flexhaler Indikator nicht sichtbar auf einen niedrigeren Wert nach einmaligem Gebrauch bewegt. Fragen Sie Ihren Apotheker, wenn Sie Fragen zu den Inhalator Gerat haben.

Ihre Pulmicort Rezept nachgefullt, bevor man den Bereich der Medizin vollig. Werfen Sie den alten Inhalationsgerat entfernt. Es ist eine Einweg-Behalter und kann nicht mit Budesonid nachgefullt werden.

Ersetzen Sie immer den Deckel. Shop Inhalator bei einer Raumtemperatur zwischen 59 und 86 Grad F (15 und 30 Grad C) an einem trockenen Ort fern von Feuchtigkeit.

Verwenden Sie keine Pulmicort einen Asthmaanfall, die bereits begonnen hat, zu behandeln. Es wird nicht schnell genug arbeiten, um Ihre Symptome ruckgangig zu machen. Verwenden Sie nur ein schnell wirkendes Einatmen Medizin einen Asthma-Anfall zu behandeln.

Fragen Sie Ihren Arzt, wenn Ihr Asthma-Symptome nicht nach der Verwendung von Pulmicort fur 2 Wochen bessern.

Rufen Sie Ihren Arzt sofort, wenn Sie denken, jede Ihrer Asthma-Medikamente sind nicht so gut funktioniert wie gewohnt. Ein erhohter Bedarf an Medikamenten konnte ein fruhes Zeichen einer schweren Asthmaanfall sein.

Ihre Dosierung von Pulmicort kann sich andern, wenn Sie eine Operation haben, krank sind, unter Stress stehen, oder kurzlich hatten einen Asthmaanfall. Sprechen Sie mit Ihrem Arzt, wenn Sie Ihre Asthma-Medikamente scheinen nicht so gut zu funktionieren Behandlung oder Vorbeugung von Asthmaanfallen.

Wenn Sie auch eine orale Steroid Medikamente, nicht aufhoren mit dem Steroid plotzlich oder Sie konnen unangenehme Entzugserscheinungen haben. Sprechen Sie mit Ihrem Arzt uber die Einnahme weniger der Steroid vor dem Anhalten vollstandig.

Sie sollten nicht Pulmicort wenn Sie allergisch auf Budesonid sind, oder wenn Sie einen akuten Asthmaanfall.

Bevor Sie Pulmicort, informieren Sie Ihren Arzt, wenn Sie allergisch auf alle Drogen, oder wenn Sie: Lebererkrankungen;

Herpes-simplex-Infektion der Augen;

jede Art von Bakterien-, Pilz oder viralen Infektion, oder

eine Geschichte der Tuberkulose.

FDA Schwangerschaft Kategorie B. Pulmicort ist nicht zu erwarten, als schadlich fur ein ungeborenes Kind. Informieren Sie Ihren Arzt, wenn Sie schwanger sind oder planen, wahrend der Behandlung schwanger werden. Budesonid kann in die Muttermilch uber und kann ein Saugling schaden. Verwenden Sie keine Pulmicort ohne Rucksprache mit Ihrem Arzt, wenn Sie stillen ein Baby.

Vermeiden Sie es, in der Nahe Menschen, die krank sind oder Infektionen. Rufen Sie Ihren Arzt fur eine vorbeugende Behandlung, wenn Sie Windpocken oder Masern ausgesetzt sind. Diese Bedingungen konnen schwere oder sogar todliche bei Menschen, die mit Steroiden werden.

Dalun Zhang, Dalun

Self-determination Transition education and services for individuals with disabilities

Publications (journal articles, books, book chapters) *

1. Barrett, D. E. Ju, S. Katsiyannis, A. & Zhang, D. (2015). Females in the juvenile justice system: Influences on delinquency and recidivism. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 24, 427-433

2. Tass, M. J. Schalock, R. L. Thissen, D. Balboni, G. Bersani, H. Borthwick-Duffy, S. A. Spreat, S. Widaman, K. F. Zhang, D. & Navas, P. (in press). Development and standardization of the Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale: Application of item response theory to the assessment of adaptive behavior. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

3. Barrett, D. E. Katsiyannis, A. Zhang, D. & Kingree, J. B. (2015). Predictors of teen childbearing among delinquent and non-delinquent females. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 24, 970-978

4. Ju, S. Kortering, L. Osmani, K. & Zhang, D. (2015). Vocational rehabilitation transition outcomes: A look at one state's evidence. Journal of Rehabilitation, 81(2) 47-58.

5. Barrett, D. B. Katsiyannis, A. Zhang, D. & Zhang, D. (2014). A structural equation modeling analysis of influences on juvenile delinquency. Behavioral Disorders, 113-127.

6. Barrett, D. E. Katsiyannis, A. Zhang, D. & Zhang, D. (2014). Delinquency and recidivism: A multi-cohort, matched - control study of the role of early adverse experiences, mental health problems and disabilities. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, 22, 3-15. Doi: 10.1177/1063426612470514. [CIF: 2.36]

7. Ju, S. Pacha, J. Moore, K. & Zhang, D. (2014). Employability skills for entry-level employees with and without disabilities: A comparison between the perspectives of educators and employers. Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, 40, 203-212.

8. Zhang, D. Katsiyannis, A. Ju, S. & Roberts, E. L. (2014). Minority representation in special education: Five-year trends. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 23, 118-127. doi: 10.1007/s10826-012-9698-6

9. Roberts, E. Ju, S. & Zhang, D. (2014). Review of practices that promote self-advocacy for students with disabilities. Journal of Disability Policy Studies. [CIF: 1.095]

10. Balboni, G. Tasse[180][180], M. J. Schalock, R. L. Borthwick-Duffy, S. A. Spreat, S. Thissen, D. Widaman, K. F. Zhang, D. & Navas, P. (2014). The Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale: Evaluating its diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 35, 2884-2893.

1. Barrett, D. E. Ju, S. Katsiyannis, A. & Zhang, D. (2015). Females in the juvenile justice system: Influences on delinquency and recidivism. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 24, 427-433

2. Tass, M. J. Schalock, R. L. Thissen, D. Balboni, G. Bersani, H. Borthwick-Duffy, S. A. Spreat, S. Widaman, K. F. Zhang, D. & Navas, P. (in press). Development and standardization of the Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale: Application of item response theory to the assessment of adaptive behavior. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

3. Barrett, D. E. Katsiyannis, A. Zhang, D. & Kingree, J. B. (2015). Predictors of teen childbearing among delinquent and non-delinquent females. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 24, 970-978

4. Ju, S. Kortering, L. Osmani, K. & Zhang, D. (2015). Vocational rehabilitation transition outcomes: A look at one state's evidence. Journal of Rehabilitation, 81(2) 47-58.

5. Barrett, D. B. Katsiyannis, A. Zhang, D. & Zhang, D. (2014). A structural equation modeling analysis of influences on juvenile delinquency. Behavioral Disorders, 113-127.

6. Barrett, D. E. Katsiyannis, A. Zhang, D. & Zhang, D. (2014). Delinquency and recidivism: A multi-cohort, matched - control study of the role of early adverse experiences, mental health problems and disabilities. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, 22, 3-15. Doi: 10.1177/1063426612470514. [CIF: 2.36]

7. Ju, S. Pacha, J. Moore, K. & Zhang, D. (2014). Employability skills for entry-level employees with and without disabilities: A comparison between the perspectives of educators and employers. Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, 40, 203-212.

8. Zhang, D. Katsiyannis, A. Ju, S. & Roberts, E. L. (2014). Minority representation in special education: Five-year trends. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 23, 118-127. doi: 10.1007/s10826-012-9698-6

9. Roberts, E. Ju, S. & Zhang, D. (2014). Review of practices that promote self-advocacy for students with disabilities. Journal of Disability Policy Studies. [CIF: 1.095]

10. Balboni, G. Tasse[180][180], M. J. Schalock, R. L. Borthwick-Duffy, S. A. Spreat, S. Thissen, D. Widaman, K. F. Zhang, D. & Navas, P. (2014). The Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale: Evaluating its diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 35, 2884-2893.

11. *Landmark, L. J. *Roberts, E. & Zhang, D. (2013). Educators' beliefs and practices about parent involvement in transition planning. Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals, 36, 114-123 *

12. Bowman-Perrott, L. Benz, M. R. *Hsu, H. Kwok, O. *Eisterhold, L. & Zhang, D. (2013).Patterns and predictors of disciplinary exclusion over time: An analysis of the SEELS National dataset. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, 21(2), 83-96. (Published online first October 13, 2011.) *

13. Duran, J. B. Zhou, Q. Frew, L. A. Kwok, O. & Benz, M. R. (2013). Disciplinary exclusion and students with disabilities: The mediating role of social skills. Journal of Disability Policy Studies, 24(1), 15-26 *

14. Landmark, L. J. & Zhang, D. (2013). Compliance and best practices in transition planning: Effects of disability and ethnicity. Remedial and Special Education, 34, 113-125. doi: 10.1177/0741932511431831 *

15. Ju, S. Zhang, D. & Katsiyannis, A. (2013). The causal relationship between academic self-concept and academic achievement for students with disabilities: An analysis of SEELS data. Journal of Disability Policy Studies, 24, 4-14. Doi: 10.1777/1044207311427727 *

16. *Grenwelge, C. & Zhang, D. (2013). The effects of youth leadership training on self-advocacy of youth with disabilities: Implications for policies and practices. Journal of Disability Policy Studies, 24, 158-169 *

17. Ju, S. Zhang, D. & Pacha, J. (2012). Employability skills valued by employers as important for entry-level employees with and without disabilities. Career Development for Exceptional Individuals, 35, 29-38 *

18. Katsiyannis, A. Barrett, D. E. & Zhang, D. (2012). Juvenile offenders with disabilities: Challenges and promises. In E. L. Grigorenko (Ed.), Handbook of Juvenile Forensic Psychology and Psychiatry (pp.521-539). New York: Springer Publishing Company.

19. Katsiyannis, A. Zhang, D. & Mackiewicz, S. M. (2012). Promising practices for effective transition for students with emotional and behavioral disorders. In J. Bakken, F. Obiakor, & T. Rotatori (Eds.), Behavioral Disorders: Current Perspectives and Issues (157-178). Advances in Special Education Series: Emerald Group Publishing Limited

20. Martin, J. Zhang, D. & Test, D. (2012). Student involvement in the transition process. In M. L. Wehmeyer, & K. W. Webb (Eds.). Handbook of Adolescent Transition Education for Youth with Disabilities. New York: Routledge

21. Tasse, M. J. Schalock, R. L. Balboni, G. Bersani, H. Borthwick-Duffy, S. A. Spreat, S. Thissen, D. Widaman, K. F. & Zhang, D. (2012). The construct of adaptive behavior: Its conceptualization, measurement, and use in the field of intellectual disability. American Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 117, 291-303

22. Zhang, J. & Goodson, P. (2011). Acculturatio and psychosocial adjustment of Chinese international students: Examining mediation and moderation effects. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 35, 614-627

23. Zhang, D. *Hsu, H. Y. Katsiyannis, A. Barrett, D. E. & *Ju, S. (2011). Adolescents with disabilities in the juvenile justice system: Patterns of recidivism. Exceptional Children, 77, 283-298 *

24. *Hsu, H. Zhang, D. Kwok, O. & Li, Y. (2011). Distinguishing the influences of father and mother's involvement on adolescent academic achievement: Analyses of Taiwan Education Panel Survey data. Journal of Early Adolescence, 31, 694-714 *

25. Zhang, D. Barrett, D. E. Katsiyannis, A. & Yoon, M. (2011). Juvenile Offenders with and without Disabilities: Risks and Patterns of Recidivism. Learning and Individual Differences, 21, 12-18

26. Bowman-Perrott, L. Benz, M. R. *Hsu, H. Kwok, O. *Eisterhold, L. & Zhang, D. (2011). Patterns and predictors of disciplinary exclusion over time: An analysis of the SEELS national dataset. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders *

27. Wehmeyer, M. L. Abery, B. Zhang, D. Ward, K. Willis, D. Amin, W. H. Balcazar, F. Ball, A. Bacon, A. Calkins, C. Heller, T. Goode, T. Jesien, G. McVeigh, T. Nygren, M. Palmer, S. & Walker, H. (2011). Personal self-determination and moderating variables that impact efforts to promote self-determination. Exceptionality, 19, 19-30.

28. Zhang, J. & Goodson, P. (2011). Predictors of international students' psychosocial adjustment to life in the United States: A systematic review. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 35, 139-162

29. Zhang, D. *Hsu, H. Y. Kwok, O. Benz, M. & Bowman-Perrott, L. (2011). The impact of basic-level parent engagements on student achievement: Patterns associated with race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status (SES). Journal of Disability Policy Studies, 22, 28-39 *

30. Grenwelge, C. Zhang, D. & Landmark, L. (2010). Comprehensive leadership training for youth with disabilities: A new and improved youth leadership forum model. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 42(4), 61-68 *

31. Resch, J. A. Mireles, G. Benz, M. R. Grenwelge, C. Peterson, R. & Zhang, D. (2010). Giving parents a voice: A qualitative study of the challenges experienced by parents of children with disabilities. Rehabilitation Psychology, 55, 139-150 *

32. Barrett, D. E. Katsiyannis, A. & Zhang, D. (2010). Predictors of offense severity, adjudication, incarceration and repeat referrals for juvenile offenders: A multi-cohort replication study. Remedial and Special Education, 31, 261-275 *

33. Zhang, D. Landmark, L. Grenwelge, C. & Montoya, L. (2010). Self-determination practices among culturally diverse families: Parental perspectives. Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities, 45, 175-186 *

34. Landmark, L. J. Ju, S. & Zhang, D. (2010). Substantiated best practices in transition: Fifteen plus years later. Career Development for Exceptional Individuals, 33, 165-176

35. Ju, S. Byrns, G. & Zhang, D. (2010). Teaching math to students with significant disabilities. College Station, TX: Texas A&M University

36. Zhang, D. Willson, V. Katsiyannis, A. Barrett, D. E. Ju, S. & Wu, J. Y. (2010). Truancy offenders in the juvenile justice system: A multi-cohort replication study. Behavioral Disorders, 25, 229-242 *

37. Zhang, D. D. Landmark, L. J. Reber, A. *Hsu, H. Kwok, O. & Benz, M. R. (2010). University faculty knowledge, beliefs, and practices in providing adequate services to students with disabilities. Remedial and Special Education, 31, 276-286 *

38. Katsiyannis, A. Zhang, D. Landmark, L. & Reber, A. (2009). Postsecondary education for individuals with disabilities: Legal and practice considerations. Journal of Disability Policy Studies, 20, 35-45 *

39. Katsiyannis, A. Zhang, D. & Conroy, M. (2008). District-level administrators' perspectives on the implementation of functional behavior assessment in schools. Behavioral Disorders, 34, 14-26

40. Katsiyannis, A. Ryan, J. B. Zhang, D. & Spann, A. (2008). Juvenile delinquency and recidivism: The impact of academic achievement. Reading and Writing Quarterly, 24, 177-196. *

41. Landmark, L. J. Zhang, D. D. & Montoya, L. (2007). Culturally diverse parents' experiences in their children?s transition: Knowledge and involvement. Career Development for Exceptional Individuals, 30, 68-79. *

42. Zhang, D. Katsiyannis, A. Barrett, D. E. & Willson, V. L. (2007). Truancy offenders in the juvenile justice system: Examinations of first and second referrals. Remedial and Special Education, 28, 244-256.

43. Trainor, A. & Zhang, D. D. (2007). From the guest editor. Career Development for Exceptional Individuals, 30, 66-67.

44. Katsiyannis, K. Zhang. D. Ryan, J. B. & Jones, J. (2007). High stakes testing and students with disabilities: Challenges and promises. Journal of Disability Policy Studies, 18, 160-167. *

45. Zhang, D. Katsiyannis, A. & Kortering, L. (2007). Performance on exit exams by students with disabilities: a four-year analysis. Career Development for Exceptional Individuals, 30, 48-57.

46. Zhang, D. & Benz, M. R. (2006). Enhancing self-determination of culturally-diverse students with disabilities: Current status and future directions. Focus on Exceptional Children, 38(9), 1-12.

47. Zhang, D. (2006). Parent practices in facilitating self-determination skills: The influences of culture, socioeconomic status, and children?s special education status. Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities, 30, 154-162. (Special Issue on Self-Determination).

48. Barrett, D. E. Katsiyannis, A. & Zhang, D. (2006). Predictors of offense severity, adjudication, incarceration and repeat violations for adolescent male and female offenders. Journal of Child and Family Studies.

49. Zhang, D. Wehmeyer, M. L. & Chen, L. J. (2005). Parent and teacher engagement in fostering sSelf-determination in students with disabilities: A comparison between the U. S. and the R. O.C. Remedial and Special Education, 26, 55-64.

50. Zhang, D. Ivester, J. Chen, L. J. & Katsiyannis, A. (2005). Perspectives on transition practices. Career Development for Exceptional Individuals, 28, 15-25.

51. Riccommini, P. J. Zhang, D. & Katsiyannis, A. (2005).Promising interventions for reducing aggressive behavior and drop-out rates. Journal of At Risk Issues, 2(2), 11-16.

52. Zhang, D. & Law, B. H. (2005). Self-determination as a dropout prevention strategy. Journal of At Risk Issues, 11(2), 25-31. *

53. Zhang, D. Ivester, J. & Katsiyannis, A. (2005). Teachers View of Transition Services in South Carolina: Results form a Statewide Survey. Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities, 40, 360-367.

54. Katsiyannis A. Zhang, D. Woodruff, N. & Dixon, A. (2005). Transition supports to students with mental retardation: An examination of data from the National Longitudinal Tranisition Study 2. Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities, 40, 109-116. *

55. Katsiyannis, A. Zhang, D. & Barrett, D. (2004). Background and psychosocial variables associated with recidivism among adolescent males: A three-year investigation. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, 12, 23-29.

56. Zhang, D. Katsiyannis, A. & Herbst, M. (2004). Discplinary exclusions in special education: A four-year analysis. Behavorial Disorders, 29, 337-347.

57. Chen, L. J, & Zhang, D. (2004). Important laws for individuals with disabilities in the U. S. An introduction. East Taiwan Special Education Journal, 19, 41-47.

58. Zhang, J. Zhang, D. & Chen, L. (2004). Validity and reliability of Wood Motor Success Screening Tool for children with disabilities. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 99, 1251-1256.

59. Katsiyannis, A. Zhang, D. & Conroy, M. (2003). Availability of special education teachers: Trends and issues. Remedial and Special Education, 24, 246-253.

60. Zhang, D. (2003). Email with special education teachers: An innovative way for college special education majors to link course contents to classroom experiences. Special Education Technology Practice, 5(1), 22-26.

61. Chen, L. J. & Zhang, D. (2003). Transition services in Taiwan: A comparison between service need and services received. Education and Training in Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities, 38, 334-340.

62. Zhang, J. & Zhang, D. (2002). Concurrent validity and intrarater reliability of Wood Motor Success Screening Tool for Children with Disabilities. Research Quaterly for Exercise and Sport, 73(1), 108-109.

63. Zhang, D. & Katsiyannis, A. (2002). Minority representation in special education: A persistent challenge. Remedial and Special Education, 23, 180-187.

64. Katsiyannis, A. Zhang, D. & Archwamety, T. (2002). Placement and exit trends of students with mental retardation. Education and Training in Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities, 37, 134-145.

65. Katsiyannis, A. Zhang, D. & Frye, T. (2002). Recent developments in special education litigation. Principal Leadership, April, 49-53.

66. Zhang, D. Katsiyannis, A. & Zhang, J. (2002). Teacher and parent practice on fostering self-determination of high school students with mild disabilities. Career Development for Exceptional Individuals, 25, 157-169.

67. Everson, J. M. Zhang, D. & Guillory, J. D. (2001). A statewide investigation of IEPs and transition pages in Louisiana. Career Development for Exceptional Individuals, 24, 37-49.

68. Zhang, D. (2001). Self-determination and inclusion: Are students with mild mental retardation more self-determined in regular classrooms? Education and Training in Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities, 36, 357-362.

69. Zhang, D. & Stecker, P. (2001). Student involvement in transition planning: Are we there yet? Education and Training in Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities, 36, 293-303. *

70. Zhang, D. (2001). The effect of "Next S. T.E. P." instruction on the self-determination skills of high school students with learning disabilities. Career Development for Exceptional Individuals, 25, 121-132.

71. Katsiyannis, A. & Zhang, D. (2001). Transistion services for students with disabilities: An established responsibility for building administrators. Principal Leadership, 1(7), 38-43.

72. Zhang, D. & Godsahll, J. (2000). Identifying and meeting the training needs of parents of individuals with developmental disabilities: What do the parents say? Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 44, 524.

73. Everson, J. & Zhang, D. (2000). Person-centered planning: Characteristics, inhibitors, and supports. Education and Training in Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities, 35, 36-43.

74. Zhang, D. (2000). The effect of self-determination instruction on high school students with mild disabilities. Louisiana Education Research Journal, 25(1), 29-54.

75. Zhang, D. Everson, J. M. & Goodstone, J. L. (1998). A statewide investigation of school districts' practices on collecting follow-up data of special education graduates. Louisiana Education Research Journal, 23, 89-99.

76. Zhang, D. Everson, J. M. & Stiegler, B. (1998). Program manager survey: Demographics, self-reported training needs, and preferred training formats. Career Development for Exceptional Individuals, 21, 173-186. Show Top 10

* Publication was joint-authored with students Diss Publication was from a dissertation ROS Publication was from a record of study

College of Education and Human Development Grants and Contracts (Current)

Leadership Training for Diversity at the Center on Disability and Development at Texas A&M University. (PI) DHHS-Administration for Community Living (Federal) 2016/09/01 - 2017/08/31 Total Funding: 40,000.

Catapult Round 1 - Improving Equity in Education and Health for Military Connected Children, Youth and Families (Funded amount $55,300). (Co-PI) TAMU College of Education & Human Development (State) 2016/02/01 - 2016/12/31 Total Funding: 0.

Texas A&M University Center on Excellence in Developmental Disabilities. (PI) DHHS-Administration for Children & Families (Federal) 2015/07/01 - 2020/06/30 Total Funding: 2,733,919.

Higher Education for People with Developmental Disabilities - Bridge to Career in Human Services. (PI) Texas Council for Developmental Disabilities (State) 2012/01/01 - 2016/12/31 Total Funding: 1,342,923.

College of Education and Human Development Grants and Contracts (Former)

Camp Life. (PI) Participants (Private) 2015/09/01 - 2016/08/31 Total Funding: 28,190.

Informed and Empowered. (PI) Participants (Private) 2015/09/01 - 2016/08/31 Total Funding: 60,403.

Development of Medical Imaging Curriculum at TAMU Based on Matlab Platform. (Co-PI) Mathworks, Inc (Private) 2012/06/01 - 2014/06/01 Total Funding: 1,806.

Person Centered Practices: It's a Promise to Act. (PI) Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (State) 2011/09/01 - 2016/08/31 Total Funding: 95,957.

Postsecondary Access and Training in Human Service (PATHS). (PI) Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (State) 2010/09/01 - 2011/08/31 Total Funding: 120,811.

Texas A&M University Center on Excellence in Developmental Disabilities. (Co-I) DHHS-Administration for Children & Families (Federal) 2010/07/01 - 2015/06/30 Total Funding: 2,701,430.

Teaching Mathematics to Students with Significant Disabilities. (PI) Region III ESC (State) 2010/01/15 - 2010/08/15 Total Funding: 57,950.

The Disability Training Network for the TAMUS System. (PI) US Department of Education (Federal) 2008/10/01 - 2012/09/30 Total Funding: 997,726.

Scaling Up Self-Determination. (PI) University of Kansas (State) 2008/09/01 - 2013/08/31 Total Funding: 50,000.

Texas Advanced Leadership and Advocacy Conference project (TALAC). (PI) Texas Council for Developmental Disabilities (State) 2008/09/01 - 2013/10/31 Total Funding: 777,242.

Brazos Valley Employment Project. (PI) Texas Council for Developmental Disabilities (State) 2007/09/01 - 2010/08/31 Total Funding: 375,000.

Master's Training Program for Instructional Specialists in Low-Incidence Disabilities. (Co-PI) US Department of Education (Federal) 2007/09/01 - 2013/08/31 Total Funding: 799,795.

Youth Leadership Program Training. (PI) Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (State) 2007/07/10 - 2009/08/31 Total Funding: 75,000.

Project LEAD (Leadership, Development, Action, Determination). (PI) Texas Council for Developmental Disabilities (State) 2006/09/01 - 2015/08/31 Total Funding: 625,000.

The Disability Training Network for the TAMU System. (PI) US Department of Education (Federal) 2005/10/01 - 2009/12/31 Total Funding: 937,536.

Sanaxin Indication, Action Of Sanaxin, Interactions, Sanaxin

Sanaxin [in more detail]

Sanaxin Indication:

For the treatment of respiratory tract infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes ; otitis media due to Streptococcus pneumoniae . Haemophilus influenzae . Staphylococcus aureus . Streptococcus pyogenes . and Moraxella catarrhalis ; skin and skin structure infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus and/or Streptococcus pyogenes ; bone infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus and/or Proteus mirabilis ; genitourinary tract infections, including acute prostatitis, caused by Escherichia coli . Proteus mirabilis . and Klebsiella pneumoniae .

Sanaxin Mechanism Of Action:

Sanaxin, like the penicillins, is a beta-lactam antibiotic. By binding to specific penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) located inside the bacterial cell wall, it inhibits the third and last stage of bacterial cell wall synthesis. Cell lysis is then mediated by bacterial cell wall autolytic enzymes such as autolysins; it is possible that cephalexin interferes with an autolysin inhibitor.

Sanaxin Drug Interactions:

Probenecid Probenecid increases the antibiotic's level

Food Interactions:

Take on empty stomach: 1 hour before or 2 hours after meals.

Fluoxetine Side Effects In Detail, Fluxetin

Fluoxetine Side Effects

In Summary

Commonly reported side effects of fluoxetine include: anxiety, drowsiness, tremor, diarrhea, dyspepsia, nausea, nervousness, insomnia, weakness, headache, xerostomia, decreased libido, anorexia, and decreased appetite. Other side effects include: bulimia nervosa, dizziness, skin rash, and diaphoresis. See below for a comprehensive list of adverse effects.

For the Consumer

Applies to fluoxetine: oral capsule, oral capsule delayed release, oral solution, oral syrup, oral tablet

In addition to its needed effects, some unwanted effects may be caused by fluoxetine. In the event that any of these side effects do occur, they may require medical attention.

Major Side Effects

You should check with your doctor immediately if any of these side effects occur when taking fluoxetine:

More common:

Hives, itching, or skin rash

inability to sit still

restlessness

Less common:

Chills or fever

joint or muscle pain

Rare

Anxiety

cold sweats

confusion

convulsions (seizures)

cool pale skin

diarrhea

difficulty with concentration

drowsiness

dryness of the mouth

excessive hunger

fast or irregular heartbeat

headache

increased sweating

increased thirst

lack of energy

mood or behavior changes

overactive reflexes

purple or red spots on the skin

racing heartbeat

shakiness or unsteady walk

shivering or shaking

talking, feeling, and acting with excitement and activity you cannot control

trouble with breathing

unusual or incomplete body or facial movements

unusual tiredness or weakness

Incidence not known:

Abdominal or stomach pain

agitation

back or leg pains

bleeding gums

blindness

blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin

bloating

blood in the urine or stools

bloody, black or tarry stools

blue-yellow color blindness

blurred vision

chest pain or discomfort

clay-colored stools

constipation

continuing vomiting

cough or dry cough

dark urine

decreased urine output

decreased vision

depression

difficulty with breathing

difficulty with swallowing

dizziness or lightheadedness

eye pain

fainting

fast, pounding, or irregular heartbeat or pulse

general body swelling

high fever

hives, itching, puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue

hostility

indigestion

irregular or slow heart rate

irritability

large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or sex organs

light-colored stools

loss of appetite

loss of bladder control

muscle twitching

nausea

nightmares

no blood pressure or pulse

noisy breathing

nosebleeds

pain in the ankles or knees

painful, red lumps under the skin, mostly on the legs

pains in the stomach, side, or abdomen, possibly radiating to the back

pinpoint red spots on the skin

rapid weight gain

red or irritated eyes

red skin lesions, often with a purple center

redness, tenderness, itching, burning, or peeling of the skin

severe muscle stiffness

severe sleepiness

slurred speech

sore throat

sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth

stopping of heart

sudden shortness of breath or troubled breathing

sudden weakness in the arms or legs

sudden, severe chest pain

swelling of the face, ankles, or hands

swollen or painful glands

thoughts of killing oneself

tightness in the chest

tiredness

twitching, twisting, or uncontrolled repetitive movements of the tongue, lips, face, arms, or legs

unconsciousness

unpleasant breath odor

unusual bleeding or bruising

unusual drowsiness, dullness, tiredness, weakness, or feeling of sluggishness

unusually pale skin

use of extreme physical or emotional force

vomiting of blood

yellow eyes or skin

Minor Side Effects

Some of the side effects that can occur with fluoxetine may not need medical attention. As your body adjusts to the medicine during treatment these side effects may go away. Your health care professional may also be able to tell you about ways to reduce or prevent some of these side effects. If any of the following side effects continue, are bothersome or if you have any questions about them, check with your health care professional:

More common:

Decreased appetite

Less common or rare:

Abnormal dreams

breast enlargement or pain

change in sense of taste

changes in vision

feeling of warmth or heat

flushing or redness of the skin, especially on face and neck

frequent urination

hair loss

increased appetite

increased sensitivity of the skin to sunlight

menstrual pain

stomach cramps, gas, or pain

unusual secretion of milk, in females

weight loss

yawning

Incidence not known:

Cracks in the skin

loss of heat from the body

painful or prolonged erections of the penis

scaly skin

swelling of the breasts or breast soreness in both females and males

unusual milk production

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to fluoxetine: compounding powder, oral capsule, oral delayed release capsule, oral solution, oral tablet

General

The most common side effects that have been associated with the discontinuation of placebo-controlled clinical trials were anxiety, nervousness, nausea, rash, pruritus, insomnia, asthenia, and headache.

The side effect profile appears generally similar between adults, children, and adolescents. Treatment-emergent side effects reported in pediatric patients that were reported at an incidence of at least 2% or more for fluoxetine and greater than placebo included thirst, hyperkinesia, agitation, personality disorder, epistaxis, urinary frequency, and menorrhagia. The most common side effect associated with treatment discontinuation in children and adolescents was mania/hypomania. [Ref ]

Psychiatric

Antidepressants may have a role in inducing worsening of depression and the emergence of suicidality in certain patients during the early phases of treatment. An increased risk of suicidal thinking and behavior in children, adolescents, and young adults (aged 18 to 24 years) with major depressive disorder (MDD) and other psychiatric disorders has been reported with short-term use of antidepressant drugs.

Adult and pediatric patients receiving antidepressants for MDD, as well as for psychiatric and nonpsychiatric indications, have reported symptoms that may be precursors to emerging suicidality, including anxiety, agitation, panic attacks, insomnia, irritability, hostility, aggressiveness, impulsivity, akathisia, hypomania, and mania. Causality has not been established. [Ref ]

Very common (10% or more): Anxiety, insomnia, nervousness Common (1% to 10%): Abnormal dreams, disturbance in attention, emotional lability, feeling abnormal, restlessness, sleep disorder, tension, thinking abnormal Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Akathisia, apathy, bruxism, depersonalization, elevated mood, euphoria, hostility, intentional overdose, manic reaction, neurosis, paranoid reaction, personality disorder, psychomotor hyperactivity, psychosis, suicide attempt Rare (less than 0.1%): Agitation, antisocial reaction, delusions, hallucinations, hypomania, intentional injury, mania, panic attacks, stupor Frequency not reported: Dysphemia, suicidal thoughts and behavior Postmarketing reports: Confusion, violent behaviors [Ref ]

Nervous system

Very common (10% or more): Dizziness, headache, somnolence, tremor Common (1% to 10%): Amnesia, paresthesia, taste perversion Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Abnormal gait, acute brain syndrome, ataxia, balance disorder, CNS depression, CNS stimulation, dyskinesia, hyperkinesia, hypesthesia, hypertonia, incoordination, migraine, myoclonus, neuralgia, neuropathy, seizures, syncope, vascular headache Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Abnormal EEG, cerebral embolism, cerebral ischemia, circumoral paresthesia, convulsion, decreased reflexes, dysarthria, dystonia, extrapyramidal syndrome, foot drop, hyperesthesia, neuritis, paralysis, taste loss Very rare (less than 0.01%): Serotonin syndrome (neuroleptic malignant syndrome-like effects) Postmarketing reports: Cerebrovascular accident, memory impairment, movement disorders, oculogyric crisis, tardive dyskinesia [Ref ]

One retrospective study of 23 outpatients with Parkinson's disease treated with 40 mg of fluoxetine a day reported that three patients experienced worsening of parkinsonism, two patients experienced improvement of parkinsonism, and 18 patients experienced no change. Another small study reported a series of four patients who experienced worsening of parkinsonism during treatment with fluoxetine.

Potentially life-threatening serotonin syndrome has been reported with SSRIs and SNRIs as monotherapy, but particularly with concomitant use of other serotonergic drugs and drugs that impair the metabolism of serotonin.

A number of case reports have implicated fluoxetine in causing seizures. Twelve of 6000 patients experienced convulsions during pre-marketing testing.

A case of dose-dependent exacerbation of preexisting, mild restless legs syndrome (which ultimately required discontinuation of fluoxetine) has been reported. [Ref ]

Cardiovascular

One placebo-controlled study has suggested that fluoxetine has no effects on intraventricular conduction. Other case reports have suggested that fluoxetine may rarely provoke dysrhythmias. Other conflicting case reports have suggested that fluoxetine may have a propensity to provoke and alleviate vasoconstriction. Several cases of unexpected death occurring shortly after initiation of fluoxetine therapy have been reported in elderly patients with multiple medical problems.

In one case report, QTc prolongation and torsades de pointes developed in an elderly woman 6 months after starting therapy with fluoxetine 20 mg daily. The QTc interval returned to normal following discontinuation of fluoxetine. Four additional cases suggesting fluoxetine associated QTc prolongation or torsades de pointes have been reported. [Ref ]

Common (1% to 10%): Chest pain, flushing, hypertension, palpitations, vasodilatation Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Angina pectoris, arrhythmia, congestive heart failure, generalized edema, hypotension, myocardial infarct, peripheral edema, postural hypotension Rare (less than 0.1%): Bradycardia, extrasystoles, heart block, pallor, peripheral vascular disorder, phlebitis, shock, thrombophlebitis, thrombosis, vasculitis, vasospasm, ventricular extrasystoles, ventricular fibrillation Postmarketing reports: Atrial fibrillation, heart arrest, QT-interval prolongation and ventricular arrhythmia including torsades de pointes [Ref ]

Gastrointestinal

A study of 26,005 antidepressant users has reported 3.6 times more upper GI bleeding episodes with the use of SSRIs relative to the population who did not receive antidepressant medications. Upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding was observed in 3.9 times more frequently in patients receiving fluoxetine. [Ref ]

Very common (10% or more): Diarrhea, dry mouth, nausea Common (1% to 10%): Abdominal pain, constipation, dyspepsia, flatulence, increased appetite, vomiting Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Aphthous stomatitis, buccoglossal syndrome, cholelithiasis, colitis, dysphagia, eructation, esophagitis, gastritis, gastroenteritis, glossitis, gum hemorrhage, hyperchlorhydria, increased salivation, melena, mouth ulcerations, stomach ulcer, stomatitis, thirst Rare (less than 0.1%): Acute abdominal syndrome, biliary pain, bloody diarrhea, cholecystitis, duodenal ulcer, enteritis, esophageal pain, esophageal ulcer, fecal incontinence, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, hematemesis, intestinal obstruction, pancreatitis, peptic ulcer, salivary gland enlargement, stomach ulcer hemorrhage, tongue edema Postmarketing reports: Gastrointestinal bleeding [Ref ]

Metabolic

Numerous cases of hyponatremia have been reported following treatment with an SSRI. Risk factors for the development of SSRI associated hyponatremia including advanced age, female gender, concomitant use of diuretics, low body weight, and lower baseline serum sodium levels have been identified. Hyponatremia tends to develop within the first few weeks of treatment (range 3 to 120 days) and typically resolves within 2 weeks (range 48 hours to 6 weeks) after therapy has been discontinued with some patients requiring treatment. The proposed mechanism for the development of hyponatremia involves the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) via release of antidiuretic hormone.

Decreased weight gain has been observed in association with the use of fluoxetine in children and adolescent patients. [Ref ]

Very common (10% or more): Anorexia Common (1% to 10%): Weight loss Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Decreased appetite, dehydration, gout, hypocholesteremia, hyperlipemia, hypokalemia Rare (less than 0.1%): Alcohol intolerance, creatine phosphokinase increased, diabetes mellitus, hyperkalemia, hyperuricemia, hypocalcemia, hyponatremia Postmarketing reports: Hypoglycemia [Ref ]

Other

Very common (10% or more): Fatigue (including asthenia) Common (1% to 10%): Accidental injury, chills, ear pain, feeling jittery, fever, infection, pain, tinnitus Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Face edema, feeling hot/cold, malaise, vertigo Rare (less than 0.1%): Deafness, hyperacusis, hypothermia Frequency not reported: Mucosal hemorrhage Postmarketing reports: Malignant hyperthermia [Ref ]

Genitourinary

Common (1% to 10%): Decreased libido, ejaculation disorder, erectile dysfunction, gynecological bleeding, impotence, urinary frequency Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Abortion, albuminuria, amenorrhea, anorgasmia, breast enlargement, breast pain, cystitis, dysuria, female lactation, fibrocystic breast, hematuria, impaired urination, Increased libido, leukorrhea, menorrhagia, metrorrhagia, nocturia, pelvic pain, polyuria, sexual dysfunction (occasionally persisting after treatment discontinuation), urinary incontinence, urinary retention, urinary urgency, vaginal hemorrhage Rare (less than 0.1%): Breast engorgement, galactorrhea, glycosuria, hypomenorrhea, kidney pain, oliguria, priapism, uterine fibroids, uterine hemorrhage Postmarketing reports: Enlarged clitoris, gynecomastia, vaginal bleeding [Ref ]

Urinary retention and galactorrhea have been reported with other SSRIs.

The estimates of the incidence of untoward sexual experience and performance may underestimate their actual incidence, partly because patients and physicians may be reluctant to discuss this issue. In placebo-controlled clinical trials ejaculation disorder (primarily ejaculation delay) was reported as a treatment-emergent side effect at an incidence of 6% and at least twice the incidence in placebo-treated male patients. [Ref ]

Dermatologic

Common (1% to 10%): Pruritus, rash, sweating, urticaria Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Acne, alopecia, cold sweat, contact dermatitis, ecchymosis, eczema, increased tendency to bruise, maculopapular rash, skin discoloration, skin ulcer Rare (less than 0.1%): Angioedema, furunculosis, hirsutism, petechia, photosensitivity reaction, psoriasis, purpura, purpuric rash, seborrhea Postmarketing reports: Epidermal necrolysis, erythema multiforme, erythema nodosum, exfoliative dermatitis, Stevens Johnson syndrome, thrombocytopenic purpura [Ref ]

Approximately 3% of treated patients have been reported to develop a skin reaction. [Ref ]

Endocrine

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Hypothyroidism Rare (less than 0.1%): Diabetic acidosis, hyperprolactinemia Postmarketing reports: Inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone [Ref ]

Hematologic

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Anemia Rare (less than 0.1%): Blood dyscrasia, hypochromic anemia, leukopenia, lymphedema, lymphocytosis, thrombocythemia, iron deficiency anemia Very rare (less than 0.01%): Thrombocytopenia Postmarketing reports: Aplastic anemia, eosinophilia, immune-related hemolytic anemia, pancytopenia [Ref ]

Hepatic

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Abnormal liver function tests Rare (less than 0.1%): Alkaline phosphatase increased, hepatitis, liver fatty deposit, SGPT increased Postmarketing reports: Aggravation of hepatic damage, cholestatic jaundice, hepatic failure/necrosis, idiosyncratic hepatitis [Ref ]

Hypersensitivity

Common (1% to 10%): Allergic reaction Rare (less than 0.1%): Anaphylactoid reaction, serum sickness [Ref ]

Immunologic

Common (1% to 10%): Flu syndrome Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Herpes zoster [Ref ]

Musculoskeletal

Epidemiological studies, primarily in patients aged 50 years or older, have shown an increased risk of bone fractures in patients receiving SSRIs or TCAs. [Ref ]

Common (1% to 10%): Arthralgia, twitching Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Arthritis, bone pain, bursitis, leg cramps, tenosynovitis Rare (less than 0.1%): Arthrosis, chondrodystrophy, myasthenia, myopathy, myositis, osteomyelitis, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis Frequency not reported: Myalgia [Ref ]

Ocular

Common (1% to 10%): Abnormal vision, vision blurred Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Conjunctivitis, dry eyes, mydriasis, photophobia Rare (less than 0.1%): Blepharitis, diplopia, exophthalmos, glaucoma, iritis, scleritis, strabismus, visual field defect Frequency not reported: Angle-closure glaucoma, eye pain Postmarketing reports: Cataract, optic neuritis [Ref ]

Renal

Rare (less than 0.1%): BUN increased Postmarketing reports: Kidney failure [Ref ]

Respiratory

Very common (10% or more): Pharyngitis, rhinitis Common (1% to 10%): Epistaxis, yawn Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Asthma, dyspnea, hiccup, hyperventilation Rare (less than 0.1%): Apnea, atelectasis, decreased cough, emphysema, hemoptysis, hypoventilation, hypoxia, larynx edema, lung edema, parosmia, pneumothorax, stridor, Frequency not reported: pulmonary events (inflammatory processes of varying histopathology and/or fibrosis) Postmarketing reports: Eosinophilic pneumonia, pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hypertension [Ref ]

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Not all side effects for fluoxetine may be reported. You should always consult a doctor or healthcare professional for medical advice. Side effects can be reported to the FDA here .

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