Carlich House Has To Go, Carlich


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Yaroslavik
Yes, indeed. It happens. Let's discuss this question. Here or in PM.
mishastiy
Wait, IMHO

Carlich house has to go

The Carlich house has received an eviction notice from the County: move or be demolished by October 31. The house is on the East side of the Post Office, and is owned by the County.

"The condition of the building has deteriorated to the point that it is unsuitable for occupancy," Paul Levesque, Tillamook County Chief of Staff told the Tillamook City Council at a recent meeting. "The building sees very little use and it is subject to trespass by the homeless."

Levesque went on to report, "we have an acute need for parking, which will only get worse" with the 2015 planned construction of the Highway 6/101 Intertie, which will eliminate a number of on street parking places. "It is the Board of County Commissioners desire to remove the building and construct a parking lot there."

In a letter to Tillamook City Manager, Paul Wyntergreen, the Tillamook County Commissioners map out an alternative to demolition:

"While we understand that there are some who believe that the structure has historical or architectural significance, opinions are divided on that matter. However, in the interests of preservation and/or recycling the County would first offer the structure for sale at a nominal price so that it could be relocated to another site or at least be salvaged to the extent possible. Failing that, the building would be demolished."

The Carlich house has been leased by the City of Tillamook from Tillamook County since 2003, for use by the Hoquarton Interpretive Trail/ Carlich House Committee, which meets in the house and has invested volunteer labor and grant-funded repairs to the house over the 8 years they've been using it.

The County Commissioners presented the City Council with a "Mutual Termination of the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), between the two entities regarding the house, meaning, in essence, that the City agrees to vacate the premises at the County's request. The Memorandum of Understanding was made with the provision for terminating the agreement by mutual consent.

Tilda Chadwick Jones and Charlie Woolridge represented the Hoquarton Interpretive Trail/ Carlich House group at the Tillamook City Council meeting, and outlined the group's desire to save the house. "The wood in that house was cut 50 years before the Tillamook Burn," Woolridge told the City Council. "If that's not historical, I don't know what is."

Woolridge told the City Council, "The best use for the house would be as an interpretive center." Woolridge's group proposes relocating the house to the back of the same lot, where it could serve as an interpretive center for the Hoquarton Trail, and still create space for a new public parking lot.

The City Council voted to approve the Mutual Termination of the October 20, 2003 Memorandum of Understanding, effective October 31, 2011.

Mayor Suzanne Weber stated her hope that "Tilda and Charlie are going to build a relationship with the County that will result in the moving of the house to another place on the property."

They have until October 31st to pull it off.

My name is Natalie Carlich and this is the house that my father (now deceased) grew up in and my grandmother (also deceased) later sold to county on the understanding that is was to be preserved as a historical landmark and would not be torn down. I am willing to do whatever necessary to ensure this house is moved and not demolished. I hope to get the support from the Tillamook County residents necessary to keep this house a historical landmark for the county. Thank you. If you have any suggestions on avenues I can take please email me at: nataliecarlich@yahoo. com

Excellent, jordy' -- there's been dozens of fine preservation candidates, including a major one publicly owned but yet flattened like a pancake when it was thought somebody's moneymaking corporation could use it. Does anyone recall the Armory (very historical) at right where TLC now wallows? I do. and I think of U. S.-saving vets who served there. The "C" house brings no such legacy.

I find it interesting that the house is in such disrepair as to mandate tearing down yet is sound enough to be relocated to another site. Hmmm. While I realize there is certainly value in history there need not be a movement to save everything old. Yes, by virtue of it's age the wood in it is old - so salvage the wood. It is not necessary to save every single building in Tillamook that is 50 years old or older. Save the few that have true historical significance and let the rest die a natural death.

Ok, so, let me get this straight! The County served the County an eviction notice for a house the County owns? Am I missing something here? So the County must get rid of it before the County sells the house or the County salvages or demolishes the house owned by the County. Okay.

The majority of domiciles in Oregon (for the nation, for that matter) that meet the criteria of "historic preservation" are on private land, either owned privately or via a not-for-profit corporation. The Carlich house can be done with the same -- just move it to a private small lot and have its re-establishment and upkeep NOT paid for by the taxpayers. BTW: I always understood that property upon which it sits was best foreseen as pure parking.

Because of the age of the house and the remaining physical integrity from the late 1800s, Tillamook County will ideally consult with the State Historic Preservation Office prior to any demolition activities, as per the requirements of ORS 358.653. Additionally, because the house is currently in public ownership, any member of the public could nominate it to the National Register of Historic Places if the building is determined to have architectural, cultural, or community significance. While certainly not all buildings are significant enough to warrant preservation, there are countless examples of deteriorated buildings that have been rehabilitated for economically viable uses, especially through private sector endeavors that are able to leverage the existing building material and state/federal tax incentives. Additional information on the National Register can be found here: http://www. historicpreservationleague. org/natReg. php

Well, first, I think if one was to buy a house they ought to factor in the cost of maintaining it, and, if there comes a time when you find you can't then you get rid of it before it rots away and depreciates, as is the case now.

As for the derelict men, well, we have city police a block away that don't do much all night except trap people who drive a few miles over the speed limit. I would expect that they were capable of getting a duplicate key and checking the place for bums every night. Or better yet maybe get the bums to clean the place up, obviously they need a job - I can't blame them for taking advantage of a roof over their heads.

I'm not upset about them getting rid of the house, just the fact that they let it go to waste. It can't be replaced. Maybe it's not that great of a house now that I look at it, but its condition is a reflection of the city, and everyone see it.

I was around the Post Office last Friday when smashing and breaking sounds erupted from -- was it beneath? -- the Carlich house. Two derelict men emerged, dragging backpacks and personal effluvia and appeared to have been sleeping or staying beneath the back porch region. When begging that I not notify any authorities, they offered that the Carlich locale was, ahem, "known" in their circle. They walked lumbering away and spread their tattered belongings onto the lawn of the courthouse. Would one call this situation an attractive nuisance?

I was around the Post Office last Friday when smashing and breaking sounds erupted from -- was it beneath? -- the Carlich house. Two derelict men emerged, dragging backpacks and personal effluvia and appeared to have sleeping or staying beneath the back porch region. When begging that I not notify any authorities, they offered that the Carlich locale was, ahem, "known" in their circle. They walked lumbering away and spread their tattered belongings onto the lawn of the courthouse. Does this scenario constitute an attractive nuisance?