Promethazine Vc Plain Medical Facts From, Prometin

Promethazine VC Plain

What is Promethazine VC Plain (phenylephrine and promethazine)?

Phenylephrine is a decongestant that shrinks blood vessels in the nasal passages. Dilated blood vessels can cause nasal congestion (stuffy nose).

Promethazine is an antihistamine that reduces the effects of natural chemical histamine in the body. Histamine can produce symptoms of sneezing, itching, watery eyes, and runny nose.

Phenylephrine and promethazine is a combination medicine used to treat sneezing, runny nose, watery eyes, hives, skin rash, itching, and other cold or allergy symptoms.

Phenylephrine and promethazine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Promethazine VC Plain (phenylephrine and promethazine)?

Do not give this medicine to a child younger than 2 years old. Always ask a doctor before giving a cough or cold medicine to a child. Death can occur from the misuse of cough and cold medicines in very young children.

Do not use this medicine if you have used an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur. MAO inhibitors include isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, tranylcypromine, and others.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Promethazine VC Plain (phenylephrine and promethazine)?

You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to phenylephrine or promethazine, or if you have:

high blood pressure; or

coronary artery disease.

Do not use this medicine if you have used an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur. MAO inhibitors include isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, tranylcypromine, and others.

To make sure phenylephrine and promethazine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

sleep apnea (breathing stops during sleep);

severe constipation, a blockage in your stomach or intestines;

a thyroid disorder;

liver or kidney disease;

epilepsy or other seizure disorder;

enlarged prostate or urination problems;

pheochromocytoma (an adrenal gland tumor); or

a weak immune system.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether phenylephrine and promethazine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medicine.

It is not known whether phenylephrine and promethazine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Artificially sweetened liquid medicine may contain phenylalanine. Check the medication label if you have phenylketonuria (PKU).

How should I take Promethazine VC Plain (phenylephrine and promethazine)?

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. This medicine is usually taken only for a short time until your symptoms clear up.

Do not give this medicine to a child younger than 2 years old. Always ask a doctor before giving a cough or cold medicine to a child. Death can occur from the misuse of cough and cold medicines in very young children.

Measure liquid medicine with the dosing syringe provided, or with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Do not take for longer than 7 days in a row. Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 7 days of treatment, or if you have a fever with a headache or skin rash.

If you need surgery or medical tests, tell the surgeon or doctor ahead of time if you have taken this medicine within the past few days.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not freeze.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since this medicine is taken when needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are taking the medication regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking Promethazine VC Plain (phenylephrine and promethazine)?

This medicine may cause blurred vision or impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert and able to see clearly.

Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of promethazine.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using any other cold, cough, allergy, or sleep medicine. Antihistamines and decongestants are contained in many combination medicines. Taking certain products together can cause you to get too much of a certain drug. Check the label to see if a medicine contains an antihistamine or decongestant.

Promethazine VC Plain (phenylephrine and promethazine) side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction . hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using this medicine and call your doctor at once if you have:

weak or shallow breathing;

jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

sudden weakness or ill feeling, fever, chills, sore throat, mouth sores, red or swollen gums, trouble swallowing;

uncontrollable movements of your eyes, lips, tongue, face, arms, or legs; or

severe nervous system reaction--very stiff (rigid) muscles, high fever, sweating, confusion, fast or uneven heartbeats, tremors, feeling like you might pass out.

Common side effects may include:

dry mouth, nose, or throat;

blurred vision; or

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Promethazine VC Plain (phenylephrine and promethazine)?

Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using this medicine if you are also using any other drugs, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Some medicines can cause unwanted or dangerous effects when used together. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide.

Taking this medicine with other drugs that make you sleepy or slow your breathing can worsen these effects. Ask your doctor before taking phenylephrine and promethazine with a sleeping pill, narcotic pain medicine, muscle relaxer, or medicine for anxiety, depression, or seizures.

More about Promethazine VC Plain (phenylephrine / promethazine)

Consumer resources

Professional resources

Related treatment guides

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about phenylephrine and promethazine.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2012 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 4.01. Revision Date: 2014-10-29, 4:29:04 PM.

Drug Status

Home - Nc Folklife Institute, Funzole

North Carolina Folklife Institute

Scenes from the 1976 Statewide Folklife Festival

Fall 2015 marks a season of exciting new beginnings for NC Folk. We’ve been around for the past 41 years, from putting on North Carolina’s first statewide folk festival in 1974, to working behind the scenes to support folklife programs of the NC Arts Council, to working statewide from our Durham offices.

But much of our work has always been “in the field”: working in cooperation with members of communities all across the state to document their traditions, helping equip them with the tools and skills to carry out projects of their own, and partnering with people, organizations, and localities in North Carolina to tap into folklife’s great potential as a tool for community development.

To maximize our resources and energies, NC Folk has moved out of our Durham office.

For many years we managed the folklife archives for the North Carolina Arts Council, to ensure that the public (especially communities documented in the archives) could have easy access to these materials. We are delighted that, through a three-way collaboration, these archives now have a great new home at the State Archives in Raleigh. Over the last two years NC Folk staff and interns have worked hard to digitize much of our contributions to the archive, so we’ll continue to have ready access to the rich products of our four decades of documentation. And of course, now our documentation is native digital, and continues to be archived and catalogued, with the goal of making as much as possible available online.

Meanwhile, our work has kept us out of the office more and more of the time. In just the past month members of our staff have been to Clinton, Cullowhee, Lexington, and Pembroke! We find that most people connect with us online — through our enormously popular monthly newsletter, on Facebook or other social media, or via our website.

For these reasons, we’ve decided to convert to a largely virtual office. We’re excited about shifting money from rent and other overhead into more robust service options, more online access to archival materials, and more online publications that share our research.

To make this ambitious plan a reality, we have also reconfigured our staff team. Evan Hatch joins our team as Director of Programs and Development. A very accomplished folklorist, Evan served for more than a decade as Director of Folk and Traditional Arts Programming for the Arts Center of Cannon County in Woodbury, Tennessee. There he designed and implemented a progressive, award-winning folk arts program that provided a national model for similar organizations. But he is a North Carolina native, and we are delighted to have helped woo him home.

Joy Salyers continues as Executive Director. You’ll find that, while NC Folk’s physical footprint has become smaller, our staff and overall organizational capacity have grown, further increasing our ability to carry out great work across the state. We’ll now primarily be working remotely and from the field, offering even more community trainings, site visits and consultations, and documentary fieldwork, as well as boosting our web and social media presence. Keep an eye out for us online and on the road! We’re thrilled about the future.

The North Carolina Folklife Institute is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization. Donations can be made online or by check: PO Box 61222, Durham, NC 27715.

About Us, Dalsan

About Us

Profile: RADIO DALSAN

The official Name: Radio DAL-SAN

Established on 4 th April 2012.

Category: Local FM Radio

Radio DAL-SAN operating it’s frequency of 91.5 MHz

Initially Somalis capital Mogadishu is Radio DAL-SAN head quarter

Mission of Radio DAL-SAN

Radio Dal-san has ambition to extent its operation in whole districts and regions which currently is not effectively existing, so that, Radio DAL-SAN can be able to fulfill the demands of its listeners, such as broadcasting free and fair information both internal and external news or events on daily basis.

Radio DAL-SAN works 18 hours per day;accepting the Eid, and other respecting national holy days of Somalia.

Radio DAL-SAN will air, neutral, fair and based trustful information, besides that, giving more priority of peace building, and reconciliation among combatant of Somalis communities.

Radio Dal-san committed to support and raisingawareness in the community in all aspects of social sectors including health, education and community interaction.

Giving fair confidential access to all ranks so as to share opinions and ideas.

The aim of Establishment of Radio DAL-SAN

Respecting human rights and to give an opportunity for those who are voiceless, so, they can be in touch with their demands publicly.

Collecting and broadcasting the community’s ideas which can contribute the state re-building and everything regarding community’s common interests.

To avoid all kind of penetrating ideas, which can encourage the continuation of civil war and community divergences

To encourage peace building And reconciliation among Somali community

To coordinate the community’s interactions and communication of the Somalis at home and Somalis at diaspora, so they can unite their efforts to re-build their home – country. After a long time of war, and warring sides encouragement, Radio DAL-SAN is desperate needs to play an active role to light the peace building and creating an environment, where local ordinary people have access to contribute their positive ideas, which can push Somalis forward and above the way, for new era and new Somalia and re-state the basic governmental institutions and also keeping these achievement in patriotic matter.

Buy Erizole Mebendazole Online Without Prescriptions, Erizole

Vermox is used to treat infections caused by worms such as whipworm, pinworm, roundworm, and hookworm. It is also used to treat infections caused by more than one of these worms at the same time. Vermox is an "antihelmintic," or anti-worm, medication. It prevents worms from growing or multiplying in your body.

Use Vermox as directed by your doctor.

Take Vermox with a full glass of water.

Vermox tablets may be swallowed, chewed, or crushed and mixed with food.

Take all of the Vermox that has been prescribed for you even if you begin to feel better. Your symptoms may start to improve before the infection is completely treated.

It may be up to 3 days after treatment before the worm is removed from your stomach and intestines. The amount of time it takes to cure the infection depends on how susceptible the worm is to Vermox, and how quickly your own digestive system is moving. If the infection has not been cured within 3 weeks, a second treatment may be necessary.

Fasting, laxatives, and purging will not help cure this infection.

Treatment of family members and other close contacts may be necessary. Pinworm is spread very easily to others in close contact with the infected person.

To prevent reinfection, toilets must be disinfected daily, and clothing, linens, towels, and pajamas must be changed and washed daily.

If you miss a dose of Vermox, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Vermox.

Store Vermox at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Vermox out of the reach of children and away from pets.

Active Ingredient: Mebendazole.

Do NOT use Vermox if:

you are allergic to any ingredient in Vermox.

Some medical conditions may interact with Vermox. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding

if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement

if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances

if you have certain problems resulting from worm infection (eg, hydatid disease)

if others in your home also have worm infection.

Some medicines may interact with Vermox. However, no specific interactions with Vermox are known at this time.

Important safety information:

If your symptoms do not get better within 3 weeks, or if they get worse, check with your doctor.

Do NOT take more than the recommended dose or use for longer than prescribed without checking with your doctor.

Pinworm infection spreads easily to family members and close contacts. To prevent reinfection: Disinfect toilet and change and wash underwear, bed linens, towels, clothes, and pajamas daily. Do not shake clothes, towels, or bed linens before washing. Wash hands with soap often during the day, especially before eating and after using the toilet. Do not scratch the infected area or place your fingers in your mouth. Wear shoes.

The entire household may need to be treated if one individual in the household has pinworms. Check with your doctor for more information.

For several days after treatment with Vermox, clean the bedroom floor by vacuuming or damp mopping. Avoid dry sweeping because it may stir up dust.

Lab tests, including complete blood cell counts and liver function, may be performed while you use Vermox. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments.

Vermox should be used with extreme caution in children younger 2 years; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Vermox may cause harm to the fetus. Do not become pregnant while you are using it. If you think you may be pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Vermox while you are pregnant. It is not known if Vermox is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Vermox, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby.

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects.

Check with your doctor if any of these most common side effects persist or become bothersome:

Diarrhea; stomach pain.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these severe side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); fever, chills, or persistent sore throat; hoarseness; seizures; yellowing of the eyes or skin.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider.

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Copyright © 2004-2016 All Rights Reserved

Clamentin 375 (Tablets), Clamentin

PROPRIETARY NAME (and dosage form):

CLAMENTIN 375 (Tablets)

COMPOSITION: CLAMENTIN 375 : White/off-white round, film coated tablets containing amoxycillin trihydrate equivalent to 250 mg amoxycillin and potassium clavulanate equivalent to 125 mg clavulanic acid .

PHARMACOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION: A 20.1.2 Penicillins

PHARMACOLOGICAL ACTION: (a) Bacteriology:

(i) Spectrum: CLAMENTIN is the group name for formulations containing 2, 4 and 5 parts of a broad spectrum penicillin, amoxycillin and 1 part of potassium clavulanate. Potassium clavulanate has been shown in vitro to be an irreversible inhibitor of beta-lactamases produced by; Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris . Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Bacteroides fragilis. Potassium clavulanate does not inactivate the chromosomally mediated (Sykes Type 1 Cephalosporinase) beta-lactamases produced by Acinetobacter species, Citrobacter species, Enterobacter, Indole positive Proteus, Providencia species and Serratia marcescens. In vitro the formulation showed synergism against amoxycillin-resistant organisms, with no evidence of antagonism and the activity was not reduced in the presence of serum. ( In vitro activity does not necessarily imply in vivo efficacy).

(ii) Bactericidal action: The amoxycillin component of the formulations exert a bactericidal action against many strains of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. The clavulanic acid component has very little bactericidal action. It does however, by inactivation of susceptible beta-lactamases, protect amoxycillin from degradation by a large number of beta-lactamase enzymes produced by penicillin resistant strains of organisms.

(b) Absorption: The pharmacokinetics of amoxycillin and clavulanic acid are closely allied and neither are adversely affected by the presence of food in the stomach. After an oral dose of the 2 parts amoxycillin and 1 part clavulanic acid CLAMENTIN 375 tablet, taken at the start of a meal, a mean peak serum level of 5,7 micrograms amoxycillin and 3,8 micrograms clavulanic acid per millilitre was achieved within one hour in healthy volunteers. Doubling the dose virtually doubles the peak serum level. (c) Excretion: 64,9% of amoxycillin and 37,5% of clavulanic acid are excreted unchanged in the urine in the first 6 hours after an oral dose of 2 to 1 CLAMENTIN 375 tablet. Co-administration of probenecid has little effect on the excretion of the clavulanic acid component of the formulation.

INDICATIONS: CLAMENTIN formulations are indicated for the treatment of infections caused by amoxycillin resistant organisms producing beta-lactamases sensitive to clavulanic acid: Upper respiratory tract, such as sinusitis, otitis media, tonsillitis. Lower respiratory tract, such as bronchitis (caused by amoxycillin resistant beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus para - influenzae ), pneumonia. Urinary tract infections, such as cystitis, urethritis, pyelonephritis. Skin and soft tissues. CLAMENTIN formulations will also be effective in the treatment of infections caused by amoxycillin sensitive organisms at the appropriate amoxycillin dosage since in this situation the clavulanic acid component does not contribute to the therapeutic effect.

CONTRA-INDICATIONS: Allergy to penicillins and cephalosporins. Safety in pregnancy has not been established. CLAMENTIN is contra-indicated in patients with a previous history of CLAMENTIN - associated jaundice/hepatic dysfunction.

WARNINGS: Serious and occasionally fatal hypersensitivity (anaphylactoid) reactions have been reported in patients on penicillin therapy. Although anaphylaxis is more frequent following parenteral therapy, it has occurred in patients on oral penicillins. These reactions are more likely to occur in individuals with a history of penicillin hypersensitivity and/or a history of sensitivity to multiple allergens. There have been reports of individuals with a history of penicillin hypersensitivity, who have experienced severe reactions when treated with cephalosporins. Before initiating therapy with any penicillin, careful inquiry should be made concerning previous hypersensitivity reactions to penicillins, cephalosporins or other allergens. If an allergic reaction occurs, CLAMENTIN should be discontinued and the appropriate therapy instituted: adrenaline, corticosteroids and antihistamines. Transient hepatitis and cholestatic jaundice have been reported. CLAMENTIN should be used with caution in patients with evidence of hepatic dysfunction.

DOSAGE AND DIRECTIONS FOR USE: Tablets should be taken immediately before a meal. Dosages: General Information: For infections caused by amoxycillin sensitive organisms the dosage is that approved for amoxycillin as the clavulanic acid component does not contribute to the therapeutic effect. Adult: The adult dose for CLAMENTIN is one or two CLAMENTIN 375 tablet(s) every eight hours at the start of a meal. Impaired renal function: Both amoxycillin and clavulanic acid are excreted by the kidneys and the serum half-life of each increases in patients with renal failure. Therefore, the dose may need to be reduced or the interval extended. The following schedule is proposed: Mild impairment (creatinine clearance greater than 30 mL/minute). no change in dosage. Moderate impairment (creatinine clearance 10 to 30 mL/minute). 1 tablet every twelve hours. Severe impairment (creatinine clearance less than 10 mL/minute). half a tablet every twelve hours. Haemodialysis decreases serum concentrations of both amoxycillin and clavulanic acid and an additional dose should be administered at the end of dialysis. DOSAGE GUIDE: AMOXYCILLIN-SENSITIVE ORGANISMS

UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS

LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS

URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS

SKIN & SOFT TISSUE INFECTIONS

ADULTS: CLAMENTIN 375 1-2 TABLETS 8 hourly1-2 TABLETS 8 hourly1-2 TABLETS 8 hourly1-2 TABLETS 8 hourly AMOXYCILLIN RESISTANT ORGANISMS PRODUCT UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS (otitis media) H. influenzae H. para influenzae LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS (bronchitis) H. influenzae H. para influenzae URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS E. coli Klebsiella pneumoniae SKIN & SOFT TISSUE INFECTIONS Staphylococcus aureus ADULTS: CLAMENTIN 375 2 tablets 8 hourly2 tablets 8 hourly1-2 tablets 8 hourly1-2 tablets 8 hourly SIDE-EFFECTS AND SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS: The most frequently reported adverse effects are diarrhoea, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, skin rashes, urticaria and erythema multiforme, vaginitis, abnormal taste, headache, dizziness, tiredness and hot flushes. The incidence and severity of adverse effects, particularly nausea and diarrhoea, increased with the higher recommended dose and can be minimised by administering the agent at the start of a meal. In addition, as these symptoms are especially related to the potassium clavulanate component, where these gastro-intestinal symptoms occur and a higher concentration of amoxycillin is required, consideration should be given to administering the additional amoxycillin separately. Hepatitis and cholestatic jaundice have been reported. The events may be severe, and occur predominantly in adult or elderly patients. Signs and symptoms usually occur during or shortly after treatment, but in some cases may not become apparent until several weeks after treatment has ceased. The hepatic events are usually reversible. However, in extremely rare circumstances, death has been reported. These have almost always been cases associated with serious underlying disease or concomitant medication. A moderate rise in Aspartate transaminase and/or Alanine transaminase has been noted in patients treated with CLAMENTIN . The following adverse reactions have been reported for ampicillin class antibiotics and may occur with CLAMENTIN . Gastro-Intestinal - gastritis, stomatitis, glossitis, black 'hairy tongue, enterocolitis and pseudomembranous colitis. If gastrointestinal reactions are evident, they may be reduced by taking CLAMENTIN at the start of a meal. Hypersensitivity - skin rashes, urticaria, erythema multiforme, rare cases of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and less frequently exfoliative dermatitis and toxic epidermal necrolysis have been reported. Whenever such reactions occur, CLAMENTIN should be discontinued. Serious and occasional fatal hypersensitivity (anaphylactic) reactions and angioneurotic oedema can occur with oral penicillin (see warnings). Haematopoietic and lymphatic - Anaemia, thrombocytopenia, thrombocytopenic purpura, eosinophilia, leucopenia and agranulocytosis have been reported during therapy with penicillins. These reactions are usually reversible on discontinuation of therapy and are believed to be hypersensitivity phenomena. A slight thrombocytosis was noted in less than 1% of the patients treated with CLAMENTIN . Prolongation of bleeding time and prothrombin time have also been reported less frequently. Precautions: Periodic assessment of organ system functions, including renal, hepatic and haematopoietic function, is advisable during prolonged therapy. Since CLAMENTIN contains amoxycillin, an aminopenicillin, it is not the treatment of choice in patients presenting with sore throat or pharyngitis because of the possibility that the underlying cause is infectious mononucleosis, in the presence of which there is a high incidence of rash if amoxycillin is used. CLAMENTIN should be given with caution to patients with lymphatic leukaemia since they are especially susceptible to amoxycillin induced skin rashes. The possibility of superinfections with mycotic or bacterial pathogens should be kept in mind during therapy. If superinfections occur (usually involving Aerobacter, Pseudomonas or Candida), the agent should be discontinued and/or appropriate therapy instituted. Impaired hepatic function - Changes in liver function tests have been observed in some patients receiving CLAMENTIN . It should be used with care in patients with evidence of severe hepatic dysfunction. Impaired renal function - in patients with moderate or severe renal impairment CLAMENTIN dosage should be adjusted. (See Dosage and Administration.) Use in lactation - amoxycillin is excreted in the milk; there is no data on the excretion of clavulanic acid in human milk. Therefore, caution should be exercised when CLAMENTIN is administered to a nursing woman.

Interactions: Probenecid decreases the renal tubular secretion of amoxycillin, but does not affect clavulanic acid excretion. Concurrent use with CLAMENTIN may result in increased and prolonged blood levels of amoxycillin but not of clavulanic acid. The concurrent administration of allopurinol and ampicillin substantially increases the incidence of rashes in patients receiving both agents as compared to patients receiving ampicillin alone. It is not known whether this potentiation of ampicillin rashes is due to allopurinol or the hyperuricaemia present in these patients. There is no data on CLAMENTIN and allopurinol administered concurrently. No information is available about the concurrent use of CLAMENTIN and alcohol. However, the ingestion of alcohol whilst being treated with some other beta-lactam antibiotics has precipitated a disulfiram (Antabuse) like reaction in some patients. Therefore, the ingestion of alcohol should be avoided during and for several days after treatment with CLAMENTIN . Following administration of ampicillin to pregnant woman a transient decrease in plasma concentration of total conjugate oestriol, oestriol-glucuronide, conjugated oestrone and oestradiol has been noted. This effect may also occur with amoxycillin and therefore CLAMENTIN . CLAMENTIN may reduce the efficacy of oral contraceptives and patients should be warned accordingly. The use of this antibiotic may lead to the selection of resistant strains of organisms and sensitivity testing should, therefore, be carried out whenever possible, to demonstrate the appropriateness of therapy.

KNOWN SYMPTOMS OF OVERDOSAGE AND PARTICULARS OF ITS TREATMENT: Nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea may occur with overdosing. Treatment is symptomatic and supportive. Amoxycillin may be removed from circulation by haemodialysis. The molecular weight, degree of protein binding and pharmacokinetic profile of clavulanic a cid together with information from a single patient with renal insufficiency all suggest that this compound may also be removed by haemodialysis.

IDENTIFICATION: CLAMENTIN 375 . White/off-white, round, film coated tablets.

PRESENTATION: CLAMENTIN 375 . Amber glass bottle containing 15 or 100 CLAMENTIN 375 tablets.

STORAGE INSTRUCTIONS: KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN. CLAMENTIN preparations should be stored in a cool, dry place below 25°C. CLAMENTIN 375 TABLETS: Bottles should be kept tightly closed and the tablets should be dispensed in their original containers or in moisture-proof containers. DO NOT REMOVE DESICCANT

REGISTRATION NUMBER: CLAMENTIN 375 (tablets): 29/20.1.2/0542

NAME AND BUSINESS ADDRESS OF THE APPLICANT: Xixia Pharmaceuticals (Pty) Ltd. 39 Hawkins Avenue, Epping Industria Cape Town, 7460 P. O. Box 1998, Halfway House, 1685

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF THIS PACKAGE INSERT: 25.10.1995

Updated on this site: February 2001 Current: October 2004 Source: Community Pharmacy SAEPI HOME PAGE TRADE NAME INDEX GENERIC NAME INDEX FEEDBACK Information presented by Malahyde Information Systems © Copyright 1996-2004

Zeldox - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Feldox

Zeldox

How does this medication work? What will it do for me?

Ziprasidone belongs to the class of medications called antipsychotics. It is used to control the symptoms of schizophrenia and the manic phase of bipolar disorder. It works by adjusting the balance of chemicals in the brain that are involved in schizophrenia.

This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here.

Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor.

Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it.

What form(s) does this medication come in?

20 mg Each size No. 4 blue or white opaque hard gelatin capsule, imprinted in black with "Pfizer" and "ZDX 20", contains ziprasidone hydrochloride, monohydrate equivalent to 20 mg of ziprasidone. Nonmedicinal ingredients: lactose monohydrate, pregelatinized starch, and magnesium stearate.

40 mg Each size No. 4 blue or blue-opaque hard gelatin capsule, imprinted in black with "Pfizer" and "ZDX 40", contains ziprasidone hydrochloride, monohydrate equivalent to 40 mg of ziprasidone. Nonmedicinal ingredients: lactose monohydrate, pregelatinized starch, and magnesium stearate.

60 mg Each size No. 3 white or white-opaque hard gelatin capsule, imprinted in black with "Pfizer" and "ZDX 60", contains ziprasidone hydrochloride, monohydrate equivalent to 60 mg of ziprasidone. Nonmedicinal ingredients: lactose monohydrate, pregelatinized starch, and magnesium stearate.

80 mg Each size No. 2 blue or white-opaque hard gelatin capsule, imprinted in black with "Pfizer" and "ZDX 80", contains ziprasidone hydrochloride, monohydrate equivalent to 80 mg of ziprasidone. Nonmedicinal ingredients: lactose monohydrate, pregelatinized starch, and magnesium stearate.

How should I use this medication?

For the treatment of schizophrenia, the usual adult starting dose of ziprasidone is 40 mg twice daily, although a lower dose may be used. The dose can be increased gradually every 2 days up to 80 mg twice daily, as recommended by the doctor.

For the treatment of the manic phase of bipolar disorder, the recommended adult starting dose is 40 mg twice daily for 1 day, then increased to 60 mg or 80 mg twice daily.

For maintenance treatment, your doctor will recommend an appropriate dose for you.

The capsules should be swallowed whole with a glass of water. Take this medication with food at the same time every day.

Many things can affect the dose of a medication that a person needs, such as body weight, other medical conditions, and other medications. If your doctor has recommended a dose different from the ones listed here, do not change the way that you are taking the medication without consulting your doctor.

It is important to take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. If you miss a dose by only a few hours, take it as soon as possible and continue with your regular schedule. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one. If you are not sure what to do after missing a dose, contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Store this medication at room temperature and keep it out of the reach of children.

Do not dispose of medications in wastewater (e. g. down the sink or in the toilet) or in household garbage. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or have expired.

Who should NOT take this medication?

Ziprasidone should not be taken by anyone who:

is allergic to ziprasidone or to any of the ingredients of the medication

is taking medications such as dofetilide, sotalol, quinidine, mesoridazine, thioridazine, chlorpromazine, droperidol, pimozide, moxifloxacin, halofantrine, mefloquine, pentamidine, arsenic trioxide, levomethadyl acetate, probucol, tacrolimus, or any other medication that can cause QT prolongation

has or has a history of QT prolongation (including congenital long QT syndrome)

has recently had a heart attack

has severe heart failure

What side effects are possible with this medication?

Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent. The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor.

The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time.

Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects.

abdominal pain

agitation

constipation

diarrhea

difficulty sleeping

dizziness

drowsiness

dry mouth

fatigue

flu-like symptoms (e. g. fever, sore throat, chills)

headache

heartburn

increased cough

increased sun sensitivity

leakage of fluid or milk from breasts (women)

loss of appetite

menstrual changes

muscle aches

nausea or upset stomach

rash

respiratory tract infections

restlessness

runny nose

sensations that the room is spinning

sexual difficulties

slowness of movement

tremor

vision changes

vomiting

weakness

weight gain

Although most of the side effects listed below don't happen very often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not check with your doctor or seek medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

abnormal movements of the face or tongue

abnormal walking

changes in body temperature, or feeling very hot and unable to cool down

chest pain

dizziness, especially when standing from a lying down or seated position

fainting, losing consciousness, or feeling a change in the way your heart beats

feeling very hot and unable to cool down (usually after exercise, dehydration, or being in a warm place)

high blood pressure

muscle twitching

new or worsening constipation

painful eye movements

signs of a blood clot in the arm or leg (tenderness, pain, swelling, warmth, or redness in the arm or leg) or lungs (difficulty breathing, sharp chest pain that is worse when breathing in, coughing, coughing up blood, sweating, or passing out)

signs of high blood sugar (e. g. frequent urination, increased thirst, excessive eating, unexplained weight loss, poor wound healing, infections, fruity breath odour)

signs of infection (symptoms may include fever or chills, severe diarrhea, shortness of breath, prolonged dizziness, headache, stiff neck, weight loss, or listlessness)

Stop taking the medication and seek immediate medical attention if any of the following occur:

abnormal heart rhythms (e. g. fast or slow heart rate, palpitations), fainting, or seizures

painful erection lasting longer than 4 hours

peeling or blistering skin

seizures

signs of neuroleptic malignant syndrome (e. g. confusion, reduced consciousness, high fever, or muscle stiffness)

symptoms of a severe allergic reaction (e. g. itching or skin rash; shortness of breath; swelling of the face, lips, or tongue)

symptoms of a stroke (e. g. sudden weakness or numbness of the face, arms, or legs [especially on one side]; slurred speech; vision problems)

Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication.

Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication?

Before you begin using a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should use this medication.

Abnormal heart rhythms: This medication can cause abnormal heart rhythms. Certain medications (e. g. sotalol, quinidine, thioridazine, chlorpromazine, droperidol, pimozide, moxifloxacin, mefloquine, pentamidine, arsenic trioxide, probucol, tacrolimus) can increase the risk of a type of abnormal heart rhythm called QT prolongation, and should not be used in combination with ziprasidone. You are more at risk for this type of abnormal heart rhythm and its complications if you:

are female

are older than 65 years of age

have a family history of sudden cardiac death

have a history of heart disease or abnormal heart rhythms

have a slow heart rate

have congenital prolongation of the QT interval

have diabetes

have had a stroke

have low potassium, magnesium, or calcium levels

have nutritional deficiencies

People with any of these risk factors should discuss with their doctor how this medication may affect their medical condition, how their medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Blood clots: Ziprasidone may increase the risk of blood clots, especially in the lower leg. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have risk factors for developing blood clots (e. g. a family history of blood clots, recent major surgery, immobility due to air travel, or other reason).

Blood sugar: This medication may cause high blood sugar levels. People with diabetes should discuss with their doctor how this medication may affect their medical condition, how their medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed. If you experience weakness, increased thirst, increased urination, and increased appetite while taking this medication, contact your doctor.

Body temperature: This medication, like other antipsychotic medications, can disrupt the body's ability to control body temperature. People who exercise vigorously, who are exposed to extreme heat, are dehydrated, or are taking anticholinergic medications (e. g. benztropine, oxybutynin) are more at risk. Contact your doctor as soon as possible if you feel very hot and are unable to cool down while taking this medication.

Drowsiness/reduced alertness: Ziprasidone may interfere with activities requiring mental alertness. People taking this medication should not drive or operate machinery until they know how this medication affects them.

Low blood pressure: Ziprasidone may cause low blood pressure when rising from a sitting or lying down position. If you feel dizzy, lightheaded, feel your pulse racing, or if you faint, call your doctor. While you are taking this medication, get up slowly after you have been sitting or lying down.

Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS): Ziprasidone, like other antipsychotic medications, can cause a potentially fatal syndrome known as neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS). If you notice the symptoms of NMS such as high fever, muscle stiffness, confusion or loss of consciousness, sweating, racing or irregular heartbeat, or fainting, get immediate medical attention.

Seizures: Ziprasidone may increase the risk of seizures, especially in people who have had seizures in the past. People with seizure disorders or a history of seizures should discuss with their doctor how this medication may affect their medical condition, how their medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Tardive dyskinesia (TD): Ziprasidone, like some other antipsychotic medications may cause tardive dyskinesia (TD) to develop. TD is a potentially irreversible syndrome of involuntary, repetitive movements of the face and tongue muscles. Although TD appears most commonly in seniors, especially women, it is impossible to predict who will develop TD. The risk of developing TD increases with higher doses and long-term treatment. If you experience muscle twitching or abnormal movements of the face or tongue, contact your doctor as soon as possible.

White blood cells: As with other antipsychotics, ziprasidone can lower the number of infection-fighting white blood cells in your blood. This can increase your risk of infections. If you experience frequent colds or other infections, contact your doctor. Your doctor will monitor your white blood cell levels with blood tests during treatment with ziprasidone.

Pregnancy: This medication should not be used during pregnancy unless the benefits outweigh the risks. If you become pregnant while taking this medication, contact your doctor immediately.

Breast-feeding: It is not known if ziprasidone passes into breast milk. If you are a breast-feeding mother and are taking this medication, it may affect your baby. Talk to your doctor about whether you should continue breast-feeding.

Children: The safety and effectiveness of using this medication have not been established for children under 18 years of age.

Seniors: The safety of using this medication has not been established for adults 65 years of age or older. The increased risk of liver, kidney, and heart conditions increases the risk of side effects with the use of ziprasidone.

There may be a higher risk of strokes, heart attacks, and deaths associated with the use of ziprasidone by seniors with dementia. Seek medical attention immediately if you notice the signs and symptoms of a stroke (e. g. sudden weakness or numbness, speech problems, vision problems, dizziness, confusion, sudden severe headache) or a heart attack (e. g. discomfort or pain in the chest, back, neck, jaw, arms; sweating; shortness of breath; nausea; lightheadedness) or infection (e. g. pneumonia). Ziprasidone should not be used by seniors with dementia.

What other drugs could interact with this medication?

There may be an interaction between ziprasidone and any of the following:

alcohol

alfuzosin

amantadine

amiodarone

antiseizure medications (e. g. carbamazepine, clobazam, ethosuximide, levetiracetam, phenytoin, primidone, topiramate, valproic acid, zonisamide)

antipsychotic medications (e. g. haloperidol, risperidone, quetiapine)

arsenic trioxide

azelastine

“azole” antifungals (e. g. fluconazole, ketoconazole, voriconazole)

barbiturates (e. g. butalbital, pentobarbital, phenobarbital)

benzodiazepines (e. g. alprazolam, diazepam, lorazepam)

brimonidine

bromocriptine

buprenorphine

buserelin

chloral hydrate

chloroquine

cisapride

degarelix

desvenlafaxine

dextromethorphan

diphenhydramine

disopyramide

dofetilide

domperidone

dopamine agonists (e. g. pramipexole, ropinirole)

droperidol

famotidine

fingolimod

flecainide

fluconazole

fluoxetine

galantamine

HIV protease inhibitors (e. g. indinavir, atazanavir, lopinavir, nelfinavir, ritonavir)

indacaterol

indapamide

levodopa

lithium

macrolide antibiotics (e. g. azithromycin, clarithromycin, erythromycin)

mefloquine

methadone

methylphenidate

metoclopramide

metronidazole

mirabegron

monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs; e. g. moclobemide, rasagiline, phenelzine, selegiline, tranylcypromine)

muscle relaxants (e. g. cyclobenzaprine, methocarbamol, orphenadrine)

narcotic pain relievers (e. g. codeine, fentanyl, morphine, oxycodone)

octreotide

pentamidine

pimozide

probucol

procainamide

propafenone

quetiapine

quinidine

quinine

quinolone antibiotics (e. g. ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, norfloxacin)

rilpivirin

romidepsin

St. John’s wort

salmeterol

scopolamine

selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; e. g. citalopram, duloxetine, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline)

serotonin antagonists (antinausea medications; e. g. granisetron, ondansetron)

solifenacin

sotalol

sulfamethoxazole

tacrolimus

tamoxifen

tapentadol

tetrabenazine

thioridazine

tramadol

trazodone

tricyclic antidepressants (e. g. amitriptyline, desipramine)

trimethoprim

tyrosine kinase inhibitors (e. g. dasatinib, imatinib, nilotinib, sunitinib)

"triptan" migraine medications (e. g. eletriptan, sumatriptan)

triptorelin

tryptophan

vardenafil

venlafaxine

vorinostat

zolpidem

zopiclone

If you are taking any of these medications, speak with your doctor or pharmacist. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may want you to:

stop taking one of the medications,

change one of the medications to another,

change how you are taking one or both of the medications, or

leave everything as is.

An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Speak to your doctor about how any drug interactions are being managed or should be managed.

Medications other than those listed above may interact with this medication. Tell your doctor or prescriber about all prescription, over-the-counter (non-prescription), and herbal medications you are taking. Also tell them about any supplements you take. Since caffeine, alcohol, the nicotine from cigarettes, or street drugs can affect the action of many medications, you should let your prescriber know if you use them.

Alesse - Woman S Health, Unofem

Alesse is used to prevent ovulation as a contraception medication. The drug changes condition of cervical mucus and uterine lining and hampers movement of sperm cells to the uterus and attachment of a fertilized egg to the uterus.

Dosage and direction

Follow all recommendations of your health care advisor. Take the first on the first day of your menses or on the first Sunday after your period started. If you use Alesse for the firs time you may need additional birth control means. There are 28-day birth control packs with seven 'reminder' pills for the regular cycle. While you are using 'reminder' pills the period usually begins. Breakthrough bleeding is possible, if it becomes heavy and continues, inform your doctor. Take each pill each day about the same time. When your pill pack is over start a new one. In case of needed medical tests or surgery, it is possible that you may need to stop using Alesse for a short period of time.

Precautions Additional birth control methods (condoms or a spermicide) may be needed when you start to use Alesse. Intake of hormones may increase the risk of blood clotting, heart attack, stroke, especially in the patients over 35 y. o. or smokers. Inform your doctor if you have problems with heart, blood pressure, congestive heart failure, angina, high cholesterol, depression in history, seizures or epilepsy, diabetes, gallbladder disease, varicose veins, tuberculosis, uterine fibroid tumors, a history of fibrocystic breast disease, nodules, lumps.

Contraindications This medication cannot be used in pregnant women or those just after delivery, in patients with a stroke or blood clot in history, circulation problems, vaginal bleeding, hormone-related cancer, liver disease or liver cancer, circulation problems, abnormal vaginal bleeding, migraine headaches, a heart valve disorder, severe high blood pressure, jaundice caused by birth control pills in history.

Side effects Besides allergic symptoms (hives, skin rash, facial swelling, difficulty breathing) this medication may be a reason of sudden numbness or weakness, pain behind the eyes, problems with vision, headache, confusion, speech, or balance, a change in the pattern or severity of migraine headaches, chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling, swelling of the extremities, depression, loss of appetite, nausea, stomach pain, dark urine, jaundice.

There are drugs which can interact with Alesse. Inform your doctor about all prescribed and over-the counter medications, herbal products and food supplements you use and especially about theophylline (Respbid, Theo-Dur), acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ascorbic acid (vitamin C), prednisolone (Orapred), St. John's wort, seizure medications, cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune), a barbiturate sedatives, HIV or AIDS medications, and antibiotics.

Missed dose If you missed a pill risk of becoming pregnant increases. If you forgot to take one 'active' pill, take two pills as soon as you remember then return to your schedule. If you miss two 'active' pills in a row in first or second week of treatment, take two pills a day for two days in a row. Then return to your schedule. Use birth control test during seven days if such a 'mistake' occurred. If you miss two 'active' pills in a row during third week, or if you miss three pills in a row during any of the first three weeks, you need to start a new pack of pills as if you are a First Day starter. If you did not take three 'active' pills in a row during any of the first three weeks, start a new pack on the same day as if you are a First Day starter. If you skipped intake of two or more pills, you may not have a monthlies during this month. If you miss a period for two months in a row you might be pregnant. If you miss any reminder pills, throw the missed pills away and return to your schedule.

Overdose The most expected overdose symptoms of this medication are vomiting, nausea, and vaginal bleeding.

Storage Store at room temperature between 20-25 C (68-77 F). Store away from moisture, heat, and sunlight. It is not recommended to store in a bathroom and places available for children.

Disclaimer We provide only general information about medications which does not cover all directions, possible drug integrations, or precautions. Information on the site cannot be used for self-treatment and self-diagnosis. Any specific instructions for a particular patient should be agreed with your health care adviser or doctor in charge of the case. We disclaim reliability of this information and mistakes it could contain. We are not responsible for any direct, indirect, special or other indirect damage as a result of any use of the information on this site and also for consequences of self-treatment.

Alesse is used to prevent ovulation as a contraception medication. The drug changes condition of cervical mucus and uterine lining and hampers movement of sperm cells to the uterus and attachment of a fertilized egg to the uterus.

Dosage and direction

Follow all recommendations of your health care advisor. Take the first on the first day of your menses or on the first Sunday after your period started. If you use Alesse for the firs time you may need additional birth control means. There are 28-day birth control packs with seven 'reminder' pills for the regular cycle. While you are using 'reminder' pills the period usually begins. Breakthrough bleeding is possible, if it becomes heavy and continues, inform your doctor. Take each pill each day about the same time. When your pill pack is over start a new one. In case of needed medical tests or surgery, it is possible that you may need to stop using Alesse for a short period of time.

Precautions Additional birth control methods (condoms or a spermicide) may be needed when you start to use Alesse. Intake of hormones may increase the risk of blood clotting, heart attack, stroke, especially in the patients over 35 y. o. or smokers. Inform your doctor if you have problems with heart, blood pressure, congestive heart failure, angina, high cholesterol, depression in history, seizures or epilepsy, diabetes, gallbladder disease, varicose veins, tuberculosis, uterine fibroid tumors, a history of fibrocystic breast disease, nodules, lumps.

Contraindications This medication cannot be used in pregnant women or those just after delivery, in patients with a stroke or blood clot in history, circulation problems, vaginal bleeding, hormone-related cancer, liver disease or liver cancer, circulation problems, abnormal vaginal bleeding, migraine headaches, a heart valve disorder, severe high blood pressure, jaundice caused by birth control pills in history.

Side effects Besides allergic symptoms (hives, skin rash, facial swelling, difficulty breathing) this medication may be a reason of sudden numbness or weakness, pain behind the eyes, problems with vision, headache, confusion, speech, or balance, a change in the pattern or severity of migraine headaches, chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling, swelling of the extremities, depression, loss of appetite, nausea, stomach pain, dark urine, jaundice.

There are drugs which can interact with Alesse. Inform your doctor about all prescribed and over-the counter medications, herbal products and food supplements you use and especially about theophylline (Respbid, Theo-Dur), acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ascorbic acid (vitamin C), prednisolone (Orapred), St. John's wort, seizure medications, cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune), a barbiturate sedatives, HIV or AIDS medications, and antibiotics.

Missed dose If you missed a pill risk of becoming pregnant increases. If you forgot to take one 'active' pill, take two pills as soon as you remember then return to your schedule. If you miss two 'active' pills in a row in first or second week of treatment, take two pills a day for two days in a row. Then return to your schedule. Use birth control test during seven days if such a 'mistake' occurred. If you miss two 'active' pills in a row during third week, or if you miss three pills in a row during any of the first three weeks, you need to start a new pack of pills as if you are a First Day starter. If you did not take three 'active' pills in a row during any of the first three weeks, start a new pack on the same day as if you are a First Day starter. If you skipped intake of two or more pills, you may not have a monthlies during this month. If you miss a period for two months in a row you might be pregnant. If you miss any reminder pills, throw the missed pills away and return to your schedule.

Overdose The most expected overdose symptoms of this medication are vomiting, nausea, and vaginal bleeding.

Storage Store at room temperature between 20-25 C (68-77 F). Store away from moisture, heat, and sunlight. It is not recommended to store in a bathroom and places available for children.

Disclaimer We provide only general information about medications which does not cover all directions, possible drug integrations, or precautions. Information on the site cannot be used for self-treatment and self-diagnosis. Any specific instructions for a particular patient should be agreed with your health care adviser or doctor in charge of the case. We disclaim reliability of this information and mistakes it could contain. We are not responsible for any direct, indirect, special or other indirect damage as a result of any use of the information on this site and also for consequences of self-treatment.

Ezol Coupon, Ezol

Ezol Coupon and Discount

Our Ezol coupon and discount will save you up to 75%* off your prescription. Ezol is a prescription drug that treats tension headaches. The original cash price of Ezol is not available. If your insurance does not cover this cost, use our Ezol coupon to reduce the price. Choose if you would like to receive your Rebates prescription coupon by mail, email, text, or print. Continue reading below for more information on Ezol.

Drug Name: Ezol Generic Name(s): Butalbital/Acetaminophen/Caffeine Drug Class: Anilides Treats: Tension headaches

Ezol is also well known as acetaminophen. butalbital and caffeine which is used to reduce headache pains. Ezol can also be used to decrease fever to the patients. EzolEzol is in a class known as Anilides. Only use Ezol under the doctor's prescription.

Ezol Discount Coupon - Save Up To 75%* Off!

The free Rebates. com Ezol Coupon and Discount Card can save you up to 75%* off your prescription prices. All you have to do is print the coupon and bring it to the pharmacy to receive the benefits of our drug discount program. This coupon is not insurance and is not valid in combination with any government-sponsored drug plans.

How to use your Ezol Coupon:

Click the "Get Coupon" button below and choose to receive your Ezol coupon by Print, Email, or Text Message.

Bring your discount coupon to the pharmacy and show it to your pharmacist when you fill your prescription.

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Ezol Uses

Ezol can act as a painkiller that reduces headache pains on patients undergoing the pains. Ezol is a combination of

Acetaminophen

Butalbital

Caffeine

Migraine headaches can also be reduced by Ezol. Ezol treats or reduces pains in the following:

Tension headache

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Only use Ezol under doctor's prescription. Do not use if you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Continue using Ezol for the duration prescribed by the doctor even if the condition has improved. Ask your doctor about the benefits of Ezol before using it.

Ezol Dosage

Ezol comes with a dosage guide that must be read and understood before using the drug. Do not hesitate to contact your doctor if you have any question. Also take Ezol for the time ordered by the doctor. Ezol can be made in different form;

Tablet,

Solution

Capsule.

Recommended dosage:

Capsule 300 mg of Acetaminophen, 40 mg of caffeine and butalbital 50 mg needs to be taken by adults in every 4 hours for about 6 days.

In young patients;

Capsule 300 mg of Acetaminophen, 40 mg of caffeine and butalbital 50 mg needs to be taken by 12 year and above in every 4 hours for about 6 days.

Ezol Side Effects

Ezol may cause side effects. If you experience any severe or persistent side effects, you should contact your doctor without delay. Mild side effects should dissipate with time and do not require medical attention. Listed below are side effects associated with Ezol. Ezol medication can also cause liver infections.

Tremor

Breathing problem

Dizziness

Headache

Red, irritated eyes

Irritability

Itching.

Contact your doctor immediately if the following severe side effects occur:

Loss of concentration

Itching.

Swelling of tongue

Fainting

Irregular heartbeats

Immediately contact or visit the doctor if these symptoms are noted.

Ezol Interactions

Ezol can act as a painkiller that reduces headache pains on patients undergoing the pains. Ezol is a combination of

Acetaminophen

Butalbital

Caffeine

Migrate headaches can also be reduced by Ezol. Ezol treats or reduces pains in the following:

Tension headache

Migrate headaches

Only use Ezol under doctor's prescription. Do not use if you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Continue using Ezol for the duration prescribed by the doctor even if the condition has improved. Ask your doctor about the benefits of Ezol before using it.

Rebates. com, LLC 3960 Howard Hughes Parkway Suite 500 Las Vegas, NV 89169

Use of this website confirms your understanding that the information on Rebates. com must not be used as a substitute for Doctor directed medical instruction. The content on this website is written by a staff of researchers without medical training. Our purpose is to save you money on your Prescribed Drugs! You agree to consult a physician or professional healthcare provider for your medical and prescription drug care. We do not endorse or recommend any of the drugs mentioned on this site.

This site is provided as an educational resource and is not affiliated with the drug manufacturers in any way. All copyrighted images and trademarks are the rights of their respective owners.

*This savings represents the maximum average discount on drugs using Rebates. com for the period March 1, 2015 to March 1, 2016.

Ezol Coupon and Discount

Our Ezol coupon and discount will save you up to 75%* off your prescription. Ezol is a prescription drug that treats tension headaches. The original cash price of Ezol is not available. If your insurance does not cover this cost, use our Ezol coupon to reduce the price. Choose if you would like to receive your Rebates prescription coupon by mail, email, text, or print. Continue reading below for more information on Ezol.

Drug Name: Ezol Generic Name(s): Butalbital/Acetaminophen/Caffeine Drug Class: Anilides Treats: Tension headaches

Ezol is also well known as acetaminophen. butalbital and caffeine which is used to reduce headache pains. Ezol can also be used to decrease fever to the patients. EzolEzol is in a class known as Anilides. Only use Ezol under the doctor's prescription.

Ezol Discount Coupon - Save Up To 75%* Off!

The free Rebates. com Ezol Coupon and Discount Card can save you up to 75%* off your prescription prices. All you have to do is print the coupon and bring it to the pharmacy to receive the benefits of our drug discount program. This coupon is not insurance and is not valid in combination with any government-sponsored drug plans.

How to use your Ezol Coupon:

Click the "Get Coupon" button below and choose to receive your Ezol coupon by Print, Email, or Text Message.

Bring your discount coupon to the pharmacy and show it to your pharmacist when you fill your prescription.

Save up to 75%* off your prescription!

Ezol Uses

Ezol can act as a painkiller that reduces headache pains on patients undergoing the pains. Ezol is a combination of

Acetaminophen

Butalbital

Caffeine

Migraine headaches can also be reduced by Ezol. Ezol treats or reduces pains in the following:

Tension headache

Migraine headaches

Only use Ezol under doctor's prescription. Do not use if you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Continue using Ezol for the duration prescribed by the doctor even if the condition has improved. Ask your doctor about the benefits of Ezol before using it.

Ezol Dosage

Ezol comes with a dosage guide that must be read and understood before using the drug. Do not hesitate to contact your doctor if you have any question. Also take Ezol for the time ordered by the doctor. Ezol can be made in different form;

Tablet,

Solution

Capsule.

Recommended dosage:

Capsule 300 mg of Acetaminophen, 40 mg of caffeine and butalbital 50 mg needs to be taken by adults in every 4 hours for about 6 days.

In young patients;

Capsule 300 mg of Acetaminophen, 40 mg of caffeine and butalbital 50 mg needs to be taken by 12 year and above in every 4 hours for about 6 days.

Ezol Side Effects

Ezol may cause side effects. If you experience any severe or persistent side effects, you should contact your doctor without delay. Mild side effects should dissipate with time and do not require medical attention. Listed below are side effects associated with Ezol. Ezol medication can also cause liver infections.

Tremor

Breathing problem

Dizziness

Headache

Red, irritated eyes

Irritability

Itching.

Contact your doctor immediately if the following severe side effects occur:

Loss of concentration

Itching.

Swelling of tongue

Fainting

Irregular heartbeats

Immediately contact or visit the doctor if these symptoms are noted.

Ezol Interactions

Ezol can act as a painkiller that reduces headache pains on patients undergoing the pains. Ezol is a combination of

Acetaminophen

Butalbital

Caffeine

Migrate headaches can also be reduced by Ezol. Ezol treats or reduces pains in the following:

Tension headache

Migrate headaches

Only use Ezol under doctor's prescription. Do not use if you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Continue using Ezol for the duration prescribed by the doctor even if the condition has improved. Ask your doctor about the benefits of Ezol before using it.

Rebates. com, LLC 3960 Howard Hughes Parkway Suite 500 Las Vegas, NV 89169

Use of this website confirms your understanding that the information on Rebates. com must not be used as a substitute for Doctor directed medical instruction. The content on this website is written by a staff of researchers without medical training. Our purpose is to save you money on your Prescribed Drugs! You agree to consult a physician or professional healthcare provider for your medical and prescription drug care. We do not endorse or recommend any of the drugs mentioned on this site.

This site is provided as an educational resource and is not affiliated with the drug manufacturers in any way. All copyrighted images and trademarks are the rights of their respective owners.

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Doxycycline (Vibramycin, Oracea) Side Effects, Dosage & Uses, Doxybene

doxycycline (Vibramycin, Oracea, Adoxa, Atridox, Acticlate, Acticlate Cap, Doryx, Doxteric, Doxy)

Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

Jay W. Marks, MD

Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.

Quick Guide Infectious Mononucleosis (Mono): Symptoms and Treatment

Myopathy And Rhabdomyolysis With Lipid-Lowering Drugs, Fenofibrate

Myopathy and rhabdomyolysis with lipid-lowering drugs

Abstract

Drug-induced myopathy and rhabdomyolysis are rare adverse drug reactions (ADR). They have been seen after the introduction of modern lipid-lowering drugs more regularly. The first description after medication with clofibrate dates back to 1968. Apparently, all fibrates can induce myopathy. It usually starts after a few days of medication, or after prolonged use, showing muscle weakness and/or pain. Concomitantly, the enzyme creatininephosphokinase (CPK) is raised dramatically. Muscular necrosis can follow leading secondarily to kidney failure, and eventually to death. For the class of statins, myopathy was more often seen after their introduction, and it became their most feared adverse effect, especially in combination of statins with other drugs (mibefradil, gemfibrozil, cyclosporin). In animal models the evolution of the disease and the mechanism of action may be elucidated. Though strong epidemiological data are lacking, the incidence of myopathy is probably similar for all lipid-lowering drugs and is in the range of 0.1–0.5% with monotherapy, increasing to 0.5–2.5% with combination therapy. Severe cases of rhabdomyolysis are rarer, but may have a significant mortality. The market success of cerivastatin within a short period has led to 100s of myopathies and some dozens of deaths. Though interactions on metabolism and ensuing high plasma levels can partially explain myopathy as intoxication, there are strong indications that other (endocrine, metabolic, genetic) factors might play a role in the pathophysiology. The patient population at risk should better be defined and withheld from myopathy-inducing drugs.

Keywords

Fibrates ;

Statins ;

Myopathy ;

Rhabdomyolysis ;

Hyperlipidemic

Copyright © 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

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Buy Woman S Health - Exaflam (Brand Name Diclofenac) Online - Order Diclofenac - Purchase Woman S He

Diclofenac is used to treat pain or inflammation caused by arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis. Diclofenac may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

Use Diclofenac as directed by your doctor.

Take Diclofenac by mouth with or without food. Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Diclofenac.

Drug Class and Mechanism

Diclofenac is in a group of drugs called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Diclofenac works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body.

If you miss a dose of Diclofenac, use it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not use 2 doses at once.

Store Diclofenac at room temperature between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C) in a tightly closed container. Brief periods at temperatures of 59 to 86 degrees F (15 to 30 degrees C) are permitted. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Diclofenac out of the reach of children and away from pets.

Do not use Diclofenac if:

you are allergic to any ingredient in Diclofenac; you have had a severe allergic reaction (e. g. severe rash, hives, breathing difficulties, dizziness) to another NSAID (e. g. ibuprofen, naproxen, celecoxib) or aspirin. Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Important : Diclofenac may cause dizziness or blurred vision. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Diclofenac with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Before you start any new medicine, check the label to see if it has Exaflam or another nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) medicine in it too. If it does or if you are not sure, check with your doctor or pharmacist. Diclofenac should not be used in children; safety and effectiveness in children have not been confirmed. Pregnancy and breast-feeding: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Diclofenac while you are pregnant. It is not known if Diclofenac is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while using Diclofenac.

Possible Side Effects

Check with your doctor if any of these most common side effects persist or become bothersome:

burning or stinging; discharge; eye redness, irritation, or itching. Seek medical attention right away if any of these severe side effects occur:

severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); blurred or distorted vision; eye infection; eyelid swelling or redness; sensitivity to glare or light.

Diclofenac is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor.

First Time For Everything I Went To An Orgy - The Frisky, Orgy

First Time For Everything: I Went To An Orgy

When friend had mentioned she’d been to sex parties, I knew I wanted to go, too. Could she bring me along next time, if it wouldn’t be too weird? As it turns out, she would soon be hosting one at her very own house. Sure enough, an invitation came in my email a few days later, sternly worded emphasis on consent.

In preparation, I treated the sex party as if was a date — a group date, of sorts, where I was sure to get laid. So I did what I’d do before a normal date: I shaved the winter fur off my legs, blowdried my mane, and did my eye makeup real fancy. I squeezed into a sequin Forever 21 dress that I first/last wore at a club on my 24th birthday party, then unrolled it off like sausage casing when I realized I couldn’t breathe. I tried on my sweetest LBD and chucked that aside, too, for not being “sexy” enough. I’m supposed to look fuckable at an orgy, right? I’m a slightly overweight feminist WASP with eczema on my ankles. The Victoria’s Secret definition of fuckable isn’t really my look . I settled on jeans, boots, and a gorgeous silk blouse over some pretty lingerie.

Worrying so much about how I looked was a colossal waste of time.

The orgy hostess could not have been more sex-positive and pro-consent about the night’s activities — so much so, in fact, that the ethos of “no pressure” meant I didn’t know what to expect. Sex-positivity and respect are the best possible qualities of any sexual partner, of course. But I wasn’t sure what the social codes were, like being a freshman plunged into a class of seniors. Cue a Google search prior to leaving the house for “do orgies provide condoms …” (It turns out, they do — in a big bowl in the living room.)

Like the dork that I am, I was the first person to arrive. And there was no way would I show up at an orgy emptyhanded! My mama raised me right: I came with two kinds of crackers and three kinds of cheeses. After greeting the host and hostess, I sat at the kitchen table, chatting with each new guest, but also wondering if all I would do was eat snacks. There was a lot to think about, admittedly: every person who comes through the door is a potential sex partner.

Everybody kept their clothes on for a lot longer than I would have expected — when, all of a sudden, a man exited the bathroom wearing only his underwear. That seemed to be the cue to begin, that people were going to start getting naked . I felt surprisingly uncomfortable about stripping down to my own lingerie while everyone else was clothed; it seemed exhibitionistic, which at the point in the party, seemed like a bad thing. So instead, I chatted like I was at a normal cocktail party.

How I would initiate sexual activity was another area of confusion. The same as with wondering if/when I would take my clothes off, there wasn’t a buzzer that sounded when group sex would commence. The hostess had graciously asked me how I wanted to be approached about sexual play: ask or be asked? I’m a pretty empowered woman, so I assumed that I’d just size up a hot dude, strut over to him and ask him to doggy-style. Why not?

But my friend seemed to be suggesting that someone had their eye on me and would I prefer him to proposition me? Flattered, and without thinking, I told her, yes, he could come proposition me . That turned out to be the wrong decision, actually, because I wasn’t digging the guy in question. I had to figure out the polite, kind but firm way to convey to a complete stranger, “I don’t want to play with you.” Another thing I hadn’t anticipated: what if I don’t want to have sex with some of these people?

Leaving that fellow behind the kitchen, where more people had started taking off their clothes to reveal lingerie or underwear, I walked out into the living room. A man and a woman were fucking on the couch on the far side of the living room; he was on top with her breast in his mouth, pounding away. Oh! I thought. The orgy has started! Suddenly a little bashful, I turned a corner into the bedroom and saw four people, three women and a man, in the hostess’ bed. It felt much more cozy and intimate in there. That’s when I learned something about myself: I like to watch.

Watching other people have sex in person is completely different than watching porn. That might have been my favorite part of the entire orgy — whenever I got to watch other people fuck. The 360-degree angle is hugely arousing. And as someone who has never been satisfied by anything other than homemade porn online, watching real people experience real pleasure is totally hot. At first I wasn’t sure if it was “okay” to watch (I mean, are we supposed to avert our eyes lest we seem creepy?), but I quickly realized that the apartment is so small that everyone knows that “privacy,” such as we know it, doesn’t exist. In fact, some people seemed to be putting on a show!

The hostess saw me watching and climbed out of bed, where she had been playing with one of the three people. “What do you want to do?” she asked me. “Actually, I’d like to make out with you ,” I told her. And that’s when I finally took my clothes off, climbed into her bed, and hooked up with a woman for the very first time. (And then, um, another woman.)

Women’s bodies are so different than men’s bodies. I never knew that before. From the softness of their skin to the roundness of their breasts and ass, I felt (but, I hope, didn’t act) a bit like a gawky, fumbling adolescent. Being so up close, hands-on and exploratory female nudity — feeling both their chubby places and their bony spots — satiated a desire I’d had for a long, long time. I felt more whoa about another person’s body than I’d felt with any man in a long while.

I also learned that my sexual energy alters with the same sex. That was a surprise, as the more dominant men behave in bed, the more submissive I become. But hooking up with women, I carried the more aggressive energy. I was the one who pulled hair and wanted to grab and squeeze. As much as I love being a submissive with male partners, it was exciting to learn that I’m switch-y with women.

Weird, then, that the next activity I found myself engaging in was paddling a guy’s ass. Yup, I did that. The second guy to proposition me throughout the night had brought a paddle with him and after he gave me a public spanking on the hostess’ bed, he asked if I could do the same for him. I’m not sexually turned on by spanking men at all, but I suppose I obliged out of politeness. And come to find out, I’m good at it! I’ve gotten enough spankings over the past decade-plus to know how to give a good one. He seemed satisfied. Still, it was out of my sexual character — not in a bad way, mind you, just in a different way that my usual behaviors.

My paddling friend and I spent the rest of the night making out in bed together alongside two or three other folks. We weren’t alone: the hostess got down on the floor with someone and the guy who was first to walk around in his undies fucked someone up against the wall and on the dresser. That’s when I learned something else new about my sexual self: as much as I love to watch, listening is different. Hearing the man dirty talk with his female partner about how she was a “bad girl” as he fucked her against the wall gave me the giggles. (Perhaps it was nervous energy because it was so hot that I was wishing I was the bad girl getting fucked?) The exhibitionism was no longer something to be embarrassed about — it was the best part!

I stayed in bed almost until I left. Why did I spent the rest of the night with one partner? Well, my paddling friend was absolutely rapturous about my ass. I have an otherwise slender frame with large, pear-shaped hips/ass and weight gain tends to show just on my stomach. Even though I love my curves on my boobs and butt, I’m less enthused about my belly. But he didn’t see that: he just saw curves, curves, curves everywhere and made me feel like I have an amazing body. He couldn’t keep his hands off my ass and hips — and I lapped up the attention. In my normal day-to-day life, I have mean Internet commenters telling me a couple times a week that I’m fat or unattractive. Those are the poison darts stuck inside my brain. I don’t walk around thinking, I have a great ass. I walk around thinking, Who’ll be able to see past by belly?

But, in fact, going to an orgy turned out to be the most healthy decision I’ve ever made for my body image. It wasn’t just my paddling friend’s praise or the other men who propositioned and flirted with me throughout the night. It was the first time I really saw naked women before: Every woman in the room had a completely different body and everyone appreciated, if not outright complimented, everyone else’s physical beauty. It’s rare that we see women’s nude or nearly nude bodies portrayed in ways that aren’t shoving it down our throat as “sexy.” I felt extremely desirable just the way I am, a feeling I haven’t felt since my early 20s when I felt naturally “pretty” a lot more than I do now, which is not often. It’s no surprise that the physical beauty present was a much wider range that what we see in movies, TV, women’s magazines, or even porn. This was a true panoply of women. A few women had no hips or tits. Another girl was much larger. One woman had the longest hair I’ve ever seen in my life. There was tons of pubic hair. No one seemed to care one whit about whether these bodies were ready for a Calvin Klein ad — bodies were people .

The negative side to all those bodies, though, was my germophobia. By the time I felt ready to leave, I was thinking less about what I wanted to do with whom and instead who everyone had already hooked up with . I didn’t have much concern for STDs, because I didn’t engage in behavior that would have exposed me to any, yet I did start thinking about how quickly the common cold could fly around this party. The OCD, obsessive-hand-washing germophobe in me felt squicky about swapping so much spit with people who had already swapped spit with others. As a result, I didn’t actually have penetrative sex at the orgy because by the time I was done with my prior activities, everyone else had already hooked up with other people. My problem wasn’t “the ethics of group sex” so much as “how the common cold could spread around a group sex setting.” Alas, I managed to handle the fact I found a used condom on one of my boots with uncharacteristic calm.

Tucking myself into my own bed that night — alone, happily — I felt whoa, I can’t believe I did that about hooking up with the two women. What didn’t occur to me until the next morning and stayed with the strongly in the days since was how good I felt in my own skin. I had brunch with my friend Megan the next day and lunch with my friend Lilit the day after that and texted with my sister. All anybody wanted to ask was the nitty-gritty details of the orgy — how many people were there? was it gross. was it hot. — but I wanted to kvell about my newfound love for my own body. Yes, it was a big deal that I explored my not-quite-straight sexuality. And yes, it’s also a big deal that I played with being the more aggressive/dominant partner with one woman and the man.

The night was less about the notches in my belt, though, or the new skills on my resume. It was about how the best thing about having sex with other people turned out to be myself.

Contact the author of this post at Jessica@TheFrisky. com. Creepy emails propositioning me for sex will be deleted without a response.

First Time For Everything: I Went To An Orgy

When friend had mentioned she’d been to sex parties, I knew I wanted to go, too. Could she bring me along next time, if it wouldn’t be too weird? As it turns out, she would soon be hosting one at her very own house. Sure enough, an invitation came in my email a few days later, sternly worded emphasis on consent.

In preparation, I treated the sex party as if was a date — a group date, of sorts, where I was sure to get laid. So I did what I’d do before a normal date: I shaved the winter fur off my legs, blowdried my mane, and did my eye makeup real fancy. I squeezed into a sequin Forever 21 dress that I first/last wore at a club on my 24th birthday party, then unrolled it off like sausage casing when I realized I couldn’t breathe. I tried on my sweetest LBD and chucked that aside, too, for not being “sexy” enough. I’m supposed to look fuckable at an orgy, right? I’m a slightly overweight feminist WASP with eczema on my ankles. The Victoria’s Secret definition of fuckable isn’t really my look . I settled on jeans, boots, and a gorgeous silk blouse over some pretty lingerie.

Worrying so much about how I looked was a colossal waste of time.

The orgy hostess could not have been more sex-positive and pro-consent about the night’s activities — so much so, in fact, that the ethos of “no pressure” meant I didn’t know what to expect. Sex-positivity and respect are the best possible qualities of any sexual partner, of course. But I wasn’t sure what the social codes were, like being a freshman plunged into a class of seniors. Cue a Google search prior to leaving the house for “do orgies provide condoms …” (It turns out, they do — in a big bowl in the living room.)

Like the dork that I am, I was the first person to arrive. And there was no way would I show up at an orgy emptyhanded! My mama raised me right: I came with two kinds of crackers and three kinds of cheeses. After greeting the host and hostess, I sat at the kitchen table, chatting with each new guest, but also wondering if all I would do was eat snacks. There was a lot to think about, admittedly: every person who comes through the door is a potential sex partner.

Everybody kept their clothes on for a lot longer than I would have expected — when, all of a sudden, a man exited the bathroom wearing only his underwear. That seemed to be the cue to begin, that people were going to start getting naked . I felt surprisingly uncomfortable about stripping down to my own lingerie while everyone else was clothed; it seemed exhibitionistic, which at the point in the party, seemed like a bad thing. So instead, I chatted like I was at a normal cocktail party.

How I would initiate sexual activity was another area of confusion. The same as with wondering if/when I would take my clothes off, there wasn’t a buzzer that sounded when group sex would commence. The hostess had graciously asked me how I wanted to be approached about sexual play: ask or be asked? I’m a pretty empowered woman, so I assumed that I’d just size up a hot dude, strut over to him and ask him to doggy-style. Why not?

But my friend seemed to be suggesting that someone had their eye on me and would I prefer him to proposition me? Flattered, and without thinking, I told her, yes, he could come proposition me . That turned out to be the wrong decision, actually, because I wasn’t digging the guy in question. I had to figure out the polite, kind but firm way to convey to a complete stranger, “I don’t want to play with you.” Another thing I hadn’t anticipated: what if I don’t want to have sex with some of these people?

Leaving that fellow behind the kitchen, where more people had started taking off their clothes to reveal lingerie or underwear, I walked out into the living room. A man and a woman were fucking on the couch on the far side of the living room; he was on top with her breast in his mouth, pounding away. Oh! I thought. The orgy has started! Suddenly a little bashful, I turned a corner into the bedroom and saw four people, three women and a man, in the hostess’ bed. It felt much more cozy and intimate in there. That’s when I learned something about myself: I like to watch.

Watching other people have sex in person is completely different than watching porn. That might have been my favorite part of the entire orgy — whenever I got to watch other people fuck. The 360-degree angle is hugely arousing. And as someone who has never been satisfied by anything other than homemade porn online, watching real people experience real pleasure is totally hot. At first I wasn’t sure if it was “okay” to watch (I mean, are we supposed to avert our eyes lest we seem creepy?), but I quickly realized that the apartment is so small that everyone knows that “privacy,” such as we know it, doesn’t exist. In fact, some people seemed to be putting on a show!

The hostess saw me watching and climbed out of bed, where she had been playing with one of the three people. “What do you want to do?” she asked me. “Actually, I’d like to make out with you ,” I told her. And that’s when I finally took my clothes off, climbed into her bed, and hooked up with a woman for the very first time. (And then, um, another woman.)

Women’s bodies are so different than men’s bodies. I never knew that before. From the softness of their skin to the roundness of their breasts and ass, I felt (but, I hope, didn’t act) a bit like a gawky, fumbling adolescent. Being so up close, hands-on and exploratory female nudity — feeling both their chubby places and their bony spots — satiated a desire I’d had for a long, long time. I felt more whoa about another person’s body than I’d felt with any man in a long while.

I also learned that my sexual energy alters with the same sex. That was a surprise, as the more dominant men behave in bed, the more submissive I become. But hooking up with women, I carried the more aggressive energy. I was the one who pulled hair and wanted to grab and squeeze. As much as I love being a submissive with male partners, it was exciting to learn that I’m switch-y with women.

Weird, then, that the next activity I found myself engaging in was paddling a guy’s ass. Yup, I did that. The second guy to proposition me throughout the night had brought a paddle with him and after he gave me a public spanking on the hostess’ bed, he asked if I could do the same for him. I’m not sexually turned on by spanking men at all, but I suppose I obliged out of politeness. And come to find out, I’m good at it! I’ve gotten enough spankings over the past decade-plus to know how to give a good one. He seemed satisfied. Still, it was out of my sexual character — not in a bad way, mind you, just in a different way that my usual behaviors.

My paddling friend and I spent the rest of the night making out in bed together alongside two or three other folks. We weren’t alone: the hostess got down on the floor with someone and the guy who was first to walk around in his undies fucked someone up against the wall and on the dresser. That’s when I learned something else new about my sexual self: as much as I love to watch, listening is different. Hearing the man dirty talk with his female partner about how she was a “bad girl” as he fucked her against the wall gave me the giggles. (Perhaps it was nervous energy because it was so hot that I was wishing I was the bad girl getting fucked?) The exhibitionism was no longer something to be embarrassed about — it was the best part!

I stayed in bed almost until I left. Why did I spent the rest of the night with one partner? Well, my paddling friend was absolutely rapturous about my ass. I have an otherwise slender frame with large, pear-shaped hips/ass and weight gain tends to show just on my stomach. Even though I love my curves on my boobs and butt, I’m less enthused about my belly. But he didn’t see that: he just saw curves, curves, curves everywhere and made me feel like I have an amazing body. He couldn’t keep his hands off my ass and hips — and I lapped up the attention. In my normal day-to-day life, I have mean Internet commenters telling me a couple times a week that I’m fat or unattractive. Those are the poison darts stuck inside my brain. I don’t walk around thinking, I have a great ass. I walk around thinking, Who’ll be able to see past by belly?

But, in fact, going to an orgy turned out to be the most healthy decision I’ve ever made for my body image. It wasn’t just my paddling friend’s praise or the other men who propositioned and flirted with me throughout the night. It was the first time I really saw naked women before: Every woman in the room had a completely different body and everyone appreciated, if not outright complimented, everyone else’s physical beauty. It’s rare that we see women’s nude or nearly nude bodies portrayed in ways that aren’t shoving it down our throat as “sexy.” I felt extremely desirable just the way I am, a feeling I haven’t felt since my early 20s when I felt naturally “pretty” a lot more than I do now, which is not often. It’s no surprise that the physical beauty present was a much wider range that what we see in movies, TV, women’s magazines, or even porn. This was a true panoply of women. A few women had no hips or tits. Another girl was much larger. One woman had the longest hair I’ve ever seen in my life. There was tons of pubic hair. No one seemed to care one whit about whether these bodies were ready for a Calvin Klein ad — bodies were people .

The negative side to all those bodies, though, was my germophobia. By the time I felt ready to leave, I was thinking less about what I wanted to do with whom and instead who everyone had already hooked up with . I didn’t have much concern for STDs, because I didn’t engage in behavior that would have exposed me to any, yet I did start thinking about how quickly the common cold could fly around this party. The OCD, obsessive-hand-washing germophobe in me felt squicky about swapping so much spit with people who had already swapped spit with others. As a result, I didn’t actually have penetrative sex at the orgy because by the time I was done with my prior activities, everyone else had already hooked up with other people. My problem wasn’t “the ethics of group sex” so much as “how the common cold could spread around a group sex setting.” Alas, I managed to handle the fact I found a used condom on one of my boots with uncharacteristic calm.

Tucking myself into my own bed that night — alone, happily — I felt whoa, I can’t believe I did that about hooking up with the two women. What didn’t occur to me until the next morning and stayed with the strongly in the days since was how good I felt in my own skin. I had brunch with my friend Megan the next day and lunch with my friend Lilit the day after that and texted with my sister. All anybody wanted to ask was the nitty-gritty details of the orgy — how many people were there? was it gross. was it hot. — but I wanted to kvell about my newfound love for my own body. Yes, it was a big deal that I explored my not-quite-straight sexuality. And yes, it’s also a big deal that I played with being the more aggressive/dominant partner with one woman and the man.

The night was less about the notches in my belt, though, or the new skills on my resume. It was about how the best thing about having sex with other people turned out to be myself.

Contact the author of this post at Jessica@TheFrisky. com. Creepy emails propositioning me for sex will be deleted without a response.

Lisinopril - Blood Pressure, Longeril

Lisinopril is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension) in adults and children 6 years and older, including renovascular, acute myocardial infarction in clinically stable condition of the patients, heart failure (adjuvant treatment), diabetic nephropathy. The principle of this drug is to relax blood vessels, causing them to expand, it can lead to prevention of occurrence of strokes, heart attacks and kidney problems. Lisinopril is also used after acute myocardial recovery, and is used with other drugs (eg, "water pills" / diuretics, digoxin) to treat heart failure. This drug belongs to a class of medications called ACE inhibitors.

Dosage and direction Take medicine for adults 1 time a day. The dose is determined individually, depending on the evidence, the state of renal function and concomitant therapy. Typically, the initial dose is 2,5-5 mg, the average maintenance dose - 5-20 mg, the maximum daily - 80 mg.

Precautions Treatment is carried out under regular medical supervision (water-electrolyte balance). The process of treatment requires monitoring of blood pressure, protein level and plasma potassium, urea nitrogen, creatinine, renal function, blood picture, body weight and dieting. You have to be careful during surgery (including dental), especially when using general anesthetics that have a hypotensive effect.

Hypersensitivity, pregnancy, breast-feeding.

Possible side effects You can feel headache, dizziness, nervousness, fainting, drowsiness, insomnia, tremors, convulsions, visual disturbances, palpitations, chest pain, hypotension, arrhythmia, dry cough and malignant tumors of the lung, hemoptysis, pain when breathing, bronchitis, dry mouth, indigestion, heartburn, vomiting, diarrhea / constipation, bloating, abdominal pain, renal failure, weakening of libido, impotence, arthritis, neck pain, back pain, rash, urticaria, and syndrome of Stevens - Johnson.

Drug interactions List of the drugs that can interact with Lisinopril: gold injections to treat arthritis, lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith), a potassium supplement such as K-Dur, Klor-Con, salt substitutes that contain potassium, insulin or diabetes medication you take by mouth, aspirin or other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), diclofenac (Voltaren), etodolac (Lodine), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), and others, or a diuretic (water pill).

Missed dose Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Overdose Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Lisinopril overdose symptoms may include feeling extremely dizzy or light-headed, or fainting.

Storage Store Lisinopril at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Disclaimer We provide only general information about medications which does not cover all directions, possible drug integrations, or precautions. Information at the site cannot be used for self-treatment and self-diagnosis. Any specific instructions for a particular patient should be agreed with your health care adviser or doctor in charge of the case. We disclaim reliability of this information and mistakes it could contain. We are not responsible for any direct, indirect, special or other indirect damage as a result of any use of the information on this site and also for consequences of self-treatment.

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What is prednisoLONE?

Prednisolone is in a class of drugs called steroids. Prednisolone prevents the release of substances in the body that cause inflammation.

Prednisolone is used to treat many different conditions such as allergic disorders, skin conditions, ulcerative colitis, arthritis, lupus, psoriasis, or breathing disorders.

Prednisolone may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Precautions

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to prednisolone, or if you have a fungal infection anywhere in your body.

Steroid medication can weaken your immune system, making it easier for you to get an infection. Steroids can also worsen an infection you already have, or reactivate an infection you recently had. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor about any illness or infection you have had within the past several weeks.

Other medical conditions you should tell your doctor about before taking prednisolone include:

liver disease (such as cirrhosis);

kidney disease;

a thyroid disorder;

diabetes;

a history of malaria;

tuberculosis;

osteoporosis;

a muscle disorder such as myasthenia gravis;

glaucoma or cataracts;

herpes infection of the eyes;

stomach ulcers, ulcerative colitis, or diverticulitis;

depression or mental illness;

congestive heart failure; or

high blood pressure

If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take prednisolone.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

Prednisolone can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Steroids can affect growth in children. Talk with your doctor if you think your child is not growing at a normal rate while using this medication.

Avoid being near people who are sick or have infections. Call your doctor for preventive treatment if you are exposed to chicken pox or measles. These conditions can be serious or even fatal in people who are using steroid medication.

Do not receive a "live” vaccine while you are being treated with prednisolone. Vaccines may not work as well while you are taking a steroid.

Avoid drinking alcohol while you are taking prednisolone.

Instructions

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have received too much of this medicine.

A single large dose of prednisolone is not expected to produce life-threatening symptoms. However, long-term use of high steroid doses can lead to symptoms such as thinning skin, easy bruising, changes in the shape or location of body fat (especially in your face, neck, back, and waist), increased acne or facial hair, menstrual problems, impotence, or loss of interest in sex.

If you miss a dose or forget to take your medicine, contact your doctor or pharmacist for instructions.

Side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

problems with your vision;

swelling, rapid weight gain, feeling short of breath;

severe depression, unusual thoughts or behavior, seizure (convulsions);

bloody or tarry stools, coughing up blood;

pancreatitis (severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, fast heart rate);

low potassium (confusion, uneven heart rate, extreme thirst, increased urination, leg discomfort, muscle weakness or limp feeling); or

dangerously high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, buzzing in your ears, anxiety, confusion, chest pain, shortness of breath, uneven heartbeats, seizure).

Less serious side effects may include:

sleep problems (insomnia), mood changes;

acne, dry skin, thinning skin, bruising or discoloration;

slow wound healing;

increased sweating;

headache, dizziness, spinning sensation;

nausea, stomach pain, bloating; or

changes in the shape or location of body fat (especially in your arms, legs, face, neck, breasts, and waist).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Interactions

There are many other medicines that can interact with steroids. Below is only a partial list of these medicines:

aspirin (taken on a daily basis or at high doses);

a diuretic (water pill);

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin);

cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune);

insulin or diabetes medications you take by mouth;

antibiotics such as ketoconazole (Nizoral), rifampin (Rifadin, Rifater, Rifamate, Rimactane), or troleandomycin (Tao); or

seizure medications such as phenytoin (Dilantin) or phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with prednisolone. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

Other Names

Bubbli-Pred, Depo-Predate (obsolete), Hydeltra-T. B.A. Hydeltrasol, Key-Pred, Key-Pred SP, Medicort, Orapred, Orapred ODT, Pediapred, Pred-Ject-50, Predacort 50, Predaject-50, Predalone 50, Predate-50, Predcor, Predicort RP, Predicort-50, Prelone, Pri-Cortin 50, prednisoLONE, Cotolone, Flo-Pred, Millipred, Millipred DP, and Veripred 20

Disclaimer

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2004 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version 2.05. Revision date 8/23/04

Last updated: September 20, 2016

What is the most important information I should know about prednisoLONE?

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to prednisolone, or if you have a fungal infection anywhere in your body.

Before taking prednisolone, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions, and about all other medicines you are using. There are many other diseases that can be affected by steroid use, and many other medicines that can interact with steroids.

Your steroid medication needs may change if you have any unusual stress such as a serious illness, fever or infection, or if you have surgery or a medical emergency. Tell your doctor about any such situation that affects you during treatment.

Steroid medication can weaken your immune system, making it easier for you to get an infection or worsening an infection you already have or have recently had. Tell your doctor about any illness or infection you have had within the past several weeks.

Avoid being near people who are sick or have infections. Call your doctor for preventive treatment if you are exposed to chicken pox or measles. These conditions can be serious or even fatal in people who are using steroid medication.

Do not receive a "live” vaccine while you are taking prednisolone. Vaccines may not work as well while you are taking a steroid.

Do not stop using prednisolone suddenly, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Talk to your doctor about how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when stopping the medication.

Carry an ID card or wear a medical alert bracelet stating that you are taking a steroid, in case of emergency.

Warning

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

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Diclofenac (Fenacidon)

Diclofenac is used primarily for the treatment of inflammation and pain caused by conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. It is also effective in treating soft tissue inflammations due to tendinitis and bursitis, and treating dysmenorrhea (menstrual cramps). Diclofenac is an NSAID. NSAIDs treat the symptoms of pain and inflammation. They do not treat the disease that causes those symptoms.

Use Diclofenac as directed by your doctor!

Take Diclofenac by mouth. It may be taken with food if it upsets your stomach. Taking it with food may not lower the risk of stomach or bowel problems (eg, bleeding, ulcers). Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if you have persistent stomach upset.

Take Diclofenac with a full glass of water (8 oz/240 mL) as directed by your doctor.

If you miss a dose of Diclofenac, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Diclofenac.

Store Diclofenac at 77 degrees F (25 degrees C). Brief storage at temperatures between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C) is permitted. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Diclofenac out of the reach of children and away from pets.

Do NOT use Diclofenac if:

you are allergic to any ingredient in Diclofenac or to bovine (cow) protein

you have had a severe allergic reaction (eg, severe rash, hives, trouble breathing, growths in the nose, dizziness) to aspirin or an NSAID (eg, ibuprofen, celecoxib)

you have recently had or will be having bypass heart surgery

you have severe kidney problems

you are in the last 3 months of pregnancy.

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if this applies to you.

Some medical conditions may interact with Diclofenac. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding

if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement

if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances

if you have a history of kidney or liver problems, diabetes, or stomach or bowel problems (eg, bleeding, perforation, ulcers)

if you have a history of swelling or fluid buildup, asthma, growths in the nose (nasal polyps), or mouth inflammation

if you have high blood pressure, blood disorders (eg, porphyria), bleeding or clotting problems, heart problems (eg, heart failure), or blood vessel disease, or if you are at risk for any of these diseases

if you have poor health, dehydration or low fluid volume, or low blood sodium levels, you smoke, drink alcohol, or have a history of alcohol abuse

if you are taking an antibiotic or an anti-seizure medicine. The risk of liver problems may be increased with some of these medicines.

Some medicines may interact with Diclofenac. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Anticoagulants (eg, warfarin), aspirin, clopidogrel, corticosteroids (eg, prednisone), heparin and other blood thinners (eg, dalteparin), or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (eg, fluoxetine) because the risk of stomach bleeding may be increased

Acetaminophen because the risk of liver problems may be increased

Probenecid because it may increase the risk of Diclofenac's side effects

Cyclosporine, lithium, metformin, methotrexate, oral NSAIDs (eg, ibuprofen), or quinolones (eg, ciprofloxacin) because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Diclofenac

Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (eg, enalapril) or diuretics (eg, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide) because their effectiveness may be decreased by Diclofenac.

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Diclofenac may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

Important safety information:

Diclofenac may cause dizziness or drowsiness. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Diclofenac with caution. Do not drive or perform other possible unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it.

Serious stomach ulcers or bleeding can occur with the use of Diclofenac. Taking it in high doses, for a long time, smoking, or drinking alcohol increases the risk of these side effects. Taking Diclofenac with food will NOT reduce the risk of these effects. If you have severe stomach or back pain; black, tarry stools; vomit that looks like blood or coffee grounds; or unusual weight gain or swelling, contact your doctor or emergency room right away.

Do NOT take more than the recommended dose or use for longer than prescribed without checking with your doctor.

Diclofenac is an NSAID. Before you start any new medicine, check the label to see if it has an NSAID (eg, ibuprofen) in it too. If it does or if you are not sure, check with your doctor or pharmacist.

Do not take aspirin while you are using Diclofenac unless your doctor tells you to.

Check with your doctor or pharmacist before you take acetaminophen while you are taking Diclofenac. The risk of liver problems may be increased.

Do not switch between different forms of Diclofenac (eg, enteric-coated tablets, immediate-release tablets, capsules) unless your doctor tells you to. They may not provide the same amount of medicine to your body.

Lab tests, including kidney function, liver function, blood electrolyte levels, complete blood cell counts, and blood pressure, may be performed while you use Diclofenac. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments.

Use Diclofenac with caution in the elderly; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially stomach bleeding and kidney problems.

Diclofenac should be used with extreme caution in children; safety and effectiveness in children have not been confirmed.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Diclofenac may cause harm to the fetus. Do not use it during the last 3 months of pregnancy. If you think you may be pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Diclofenac while you are pregnant. It is not known if Diclofenac is found in breast milk. Do not breastfeed while taking Diclofenac.

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects.

Check with your doctor if any of these most common side effects persist or become bothersome:

Constipation; diarrhea; dizziness; drowsiness; headache; mild stomach pain or heartburn; nausea; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these severe side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; trouble breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); bloody or black, tarry stools; change in the amount of urine produced; chest pain; confusion; depression; fainting; fast or irregular heartbeat; fever, chills, or persistent sore throat; mental or mood changes; numbness of an arm or leg; one-sided weakness; persistent flu-like symptoms; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin; ringing in the ears; seizures; severe headache or dizziness; severe or persistent stomach pain or nausea; severe vomiting or diarrhea; shortness of breath; sudden or unexplained weight gain; swelling of the hands, legs, or feet; symptoms of liver problems (eg, dark urine, pale stools, persistent loss of appetite, yellowing of the skin or eyes); unusual bruising or bleeding; unusual joint or muscle pain; unusual tiredness or weakness; vision or speech changes; vomit that looks like coffee grounds.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider.

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Diclofenac (Vostar-r)

Diclofenac is used primarily for the treatment of inflammation and pain caused by conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. It is also effective in treating soft tissue inflammations due to tendinitis and bursitis, and treating dysmenorrhea (menstrual cramps). Diclofenac is an NSAID. NSAIDs treat the symptoms of pain and inflammation. They do not treat the disease that causes those symptoms.

Use Diclofenac as directed by your doctor!

Take Diclofenac by mouth. It may be taken with food if it upsets your stomach. Taking it with food may not lower the risk of stomach or bowel problems (eg, bleeding, ulcers). Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if you have persistent stomach upset.

Take Diclofenac with a full glass of water (8 oz/240 mL) as directed by your doctor.

If you miss a dose of Diclofenac, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Diclofenac.

Store Diclofenac at 77 degrees F (25 degrees C). Brief storage at temperatures between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C) is permitted. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Diclofenac out of the reach of children and away from pets.

Do NOT use Diclofenac if:

you are allergic to any ingredient in Diclofenac or to bovine (cow) protein

you have had a severe allergic reaction (eg, severe rash, hives, trouble breathing, growths in the nose, dizziness) to aspirin or an NSAID (eg, ibuprofen, celecoxib)

you have recently had or will be having bypass heart surgery

you have severe kidney problems

you are in the last 3 months of pregnancy.

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if this applies to you.

Some medical conditions may interact with Diclofenac. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding

if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement

if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances

if you have a history of kidney or liver problems, diabetes, or stomach or bowel problems (eg, bleeding, perforation, ulcers)

if you have a history of swelling or fluid buildup, asthma, growths in the nose (nasal polyps), or mouth inflammation

if you have high blood pressure, blood disorders (eg, porphyria), bleeding or clotting problems, heart problems (eg, heart failure), or blood vessel disease, or if you are at risk for any of these diseases

if you have poor health, dehydration or low fluid volume, or low blood sodium levels, you smoke, drink alcohol, or have a history of alcohol abuse

if you are taking an antibiotic or an anti-seizure medicine. The risk of liver problems may be increased with some of these medicines.

Some medicines may interact with Diclofenac. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Anticoagulants (eg, warfarin), aspirin, clopidogrel, corticosteroids (eg, prednisone), heparin and other blood thinners (eg, dalteparin), or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (eg, fluoxetine) because the risk of stomach bleeding may be increased

Acetaminophen because the risk of liver problems may be increased

Probenecid because it may increase the risk of Diclofenac's side effects

Cyclosporine, lithium, metformin, methotrexate, oral NSAIDs (eg, ibuprofen), or quinolones (eg, ciprofloxacin) because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Diclofenac

Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (eg, enalapril) or diuretics (eg, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide) because their effectiveness may be decreased by Diclofenac.

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Diclofenac may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

Important safety information:

Diclofenac may cause dizziness or drowsiness. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Diclofenac with caution. Do not drive or perform other possible unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it.

Serious stomach ulcers or bleeding can occur with the use of Diclofenac. Taking it in high doses, for a long time, smoking, or drinking alcohol increases the risk of these side effects. Taking Diclofenac with food will NOT reduce the risk of these effects. If you have severe stomach or back pain; black, tarry stools; vomit that looks like blood or coffee grounds; or unusual weight gain or swelling, contact your doctor or emergency room right away.

Do NOT take more than the recommended dose or use for longer than prescribed without checking with your doctor.

Diclofenac is an NSAID. Before you start any new medicine, check the label to see if it has an NSAID (eg, ibuprofen) in it too. If it does or if you are not sure, check with your doctor or pharmacist.

Do not take aspirin while you are using Diclofenac unless your doctor tells you to.

Check with your doctor or pharmacist before you take acetaminophen while you are taking Diclofenac. The risk of liver problems may be increased.

Do not switch between different forms of Diclofenac (eg, enteric-coated tablets, immediate-release tablets, capsules) unless your doctor tells you to. They may not provide the same amount of medicine to your body.

Lab tests, including kidney function, liver function, blood electrolyte levels, complete blood cell counts, and blood pressure, may be performed while you use Diclofenac. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments.

Use Diclofenac with caution in the elderly; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially stomach bleeding and kidney problems.

Diclofenac should be used with extreme caution in children; safety and effectiveness in children have not been confirmed.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Diclofenac may cause harm to the fetus. Do not use it during the last 3 months of pregnancy. If you think you may be pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Diclofenac while you are pregnant. It is not known if Diclofenac is found in breast milk. Do not breastfeed while taking Diclofenac.

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects.

Check with your doctor if any of these most common side effects persist or become bothersome:

Constipation; diarrhea; dizziness; drowsiness; headache; mild stomach pain or heartburn; nausea; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these severe side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; trouble breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); bloody or black, tarry stools; change in the amount of urine produced; chest pain; confusion; depression; fainting; fast or irregular heartbeat; fever, chills, or persistent sore throat; mental or mood changes; numbness of an arm or leg; one-sided weakness; persistent flu-like symptoms; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin; ringing in the ears; seizures; severe headache or dizziness; severe or persistent stomach pain or nausea; severe vomiting or diarrhea; shortness of breath; sudden or unexplained weight gain; swelling of the hands, legs, or feet; symptoms of liver problems (eg, dark urine, pale stools, persistent loss of appetite, yellowing of the skin or eyes); unusual bruising or bleeding; unusual joint or muscle pain; unusual tiredness or weakness; vision or speech changes; vomit that looks like coffee grounds.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider.

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Adalat is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure) and angina (chest pain). Adalat is in a class of drugs called calcium channel blockers. Adalat relaxes (widens) your blood vessels (veins and arteries), which makes it easier for the heart to pump and reduces its workload.

Take Adalat exactly as prescribed by your doctor.

Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Take Adalat on an empty stomach. Do not crush, chew, or break a tablet. Swallow it whole. Breaking the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

Do not stop taking Adalat even if you feel fine. Stopping suddenly may make your condition worse. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

Your blood pressure will need to be checked often and you may need other blood tests at your doctor's office. Visit your doctor regularly.

If you miss a dose of Adalat, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Adalat.

Store Adalat at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Adalat out of the reach of children and away from pets.

Active Ingredient: Nifedipine.

you are allergic to any ingredient in Adalat.

Some medical conditions may interact with Adalat. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding

if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement

if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances

if you have kidney or liver disease (especially cirrhosis), coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, or digestive problems

if you have recently had or will be having surgery, or if you have recently stopped taking a beta-blocker (eg, propranolol).

Some medicines may interact with Adalat. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

acarbose (Precose);

cimetidine (Tagamet);

fentanyl (Actiq, Duragesic, Fentora) or other narcotic pain medications;

digoxin (Lanoxin);

nefazodone;

St. John's wort;

rifabutin (Mycobutin), rifampin (Rifadin, Rifater, Rifamate) or rifapentine (Priftin);

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin);

an antibiotic such as clarithromycin (Biaxin), dalfopristin/quinupristin (Synercid), or erythromycin (E. E.S. EryPed, Ery-Tab, Erythrocin);

antifungal medication such as fluconazole (Diflucan), itraconazole (Sporanox), or ketoconazole (Nizoral);

a beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin, Tenoretic), carvedilol (Coreg), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), timolol (Blocadren), and others;

a heart rhythm medication such as quinidine (Quin-G) or flecaininde (Tambocor);

HIV/AIDS medicine such as atazanavir (Reyataz), delavirdine (Rescriptor), fosamprenavir (Lexiva), indinavir (Crixivan), nelfinavir (Viracept), or ritonavir (Norvir, Kaletra, or saquinavir (Invirase);

medicines used to prevent organ transplant rejection, such as sirolimus (Rapamune) or tacrolimus (Prograf);

other heart or blood pressure medications such as benazepril (Lotensin), diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem), doxazosin (Cardura), or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); or

seizure medication such as carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol), phenobarbital (Solfoton), or phenytoin (Dilantin).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with Adalat. Tell your doctor about all medications you use.

Important safety information:

Adalat may cause dizziness or lightheadedness. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Adalat with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it.

Proper dental care is important while you are taking Adalat. Brush and floss your teeth and visit the dentist regularly.

Use Adalat with caution in the elderly.

Adalat should not be used in children; safety and effectiveness in children have not been confirmed.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Adalat while you are pregnant. It is not known if Adalat is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Adalat, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Adalat: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect while using Adalat such as:

worsening angina;

feeling like you might pass out;

feeling short of breath, swelling in your hands or feet;

fast or pounding heartbeats;

numbness or tingly feeling;

jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or

chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling.

Less serious side effects may include:

headache, dizziness;

drowsiness, tired feeling;

nausea, constipation, diarrhea, stomach pain;

sleep problems (insomnia);

mild rash or itching;

joint pain, leg cramps;

warmth, redness, or tingly feeling under your skin; or

urinating more than usual.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider.

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Adalat (Nifelantern cr)

Adalat is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure) and angina (chest pain). Adalat is in a class of drugs called calcium channel blockers. Adalat relaxes (widens) your blood vessels (veins and arteries), which makes it easier for the heart to pump and reduces its workload.

Take Adalat exactly as prescribed by your doctor.

Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Take Adalat on an empty stomach. Do not crush, chew, or break a tablet. Swallow it whole. Breaking the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

Do not stop taking Adalat even if you feel fine. Stopping suddenly may make your condition worse. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

Your blood pressure will need to be checked often and you may need other blood tests at your doctor's office. Visit your doctor regularly.

If you miss a dose of Adalat, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Adalat.

Store Adalat at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Adalat out of the reach of children and away from pets.

Active Ingredient: Nifedipine.

you are allergic to any ingredient in Adalat.

Some medical conditions may interact with Adalat. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding

if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement

if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances

if you have kidney or liver disease (especially cirrhosis), coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, or digestive problems

if you have recently had or will be having surgery, or if you have recently stopped taking a beta-blocker (eg, propranolol).

Some medicines may interact with Adalat. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

acarbose (Precose);

cimetidine (Tagamet);

fentanyl (Actiq, Duragesic, Fentora) or other narcotic pain medications;

digoxin (Lanoxin);

nefazodone;

St. John's wort;

rifabutin (Mycobutin), rifampin (Rifadin, Rifater, Rifamate) or rifapentine (Priftin);

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin);

an antibiotic such as clarithromycin (Biaxin), dalfopristin/quinupristin (Synercid), or erythromycin (E. E.S. EryPed, Ery-Tab, Erythrocin);

antifungal medication such as fluconazole (Diflucan), itraconazole (Sporanox), or ketoconazole (Nizoral);

a beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin, Tenoretic), carvedilol (Coreg), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), timolol (Blocadren), and others;

a heart rhythm medication such as quinidine (Quin-G) or flecaininde (Tambocor);

HIV/AIDS medicine such as atazanavir (Reyataz), delavirdine (Rescriptor), fosamprenavir (Lexiva), indinavir (Crixivan), nelfinavir (Viracept), or ritonavir (Norvir, Kaletra, or saquinavir (Invirase);

medicines used to prevent organ transplant rejection, such as sirolimus (Rapamune) or tacrolimus (Prograf);

other heart or blood pressure medications such as benazepril (Lotensin), diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem), doxazosin (Cardura), or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); or

seizure medication such as carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol), phenobarbital (Solfoton), or phenytoin (Dilantin).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with Adalat. Tell your doctor about all medications you use.

Important safety information:

Adalat may cause dizziness or lightheadedness. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Adalat with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it.

Proper dental care is important while you are taking Adalat. Brush and floss your teeth and visit the dentist regularly.

Use Adalat with caution in the elderly.

Adalat should not be used in children; safety and effectiveness in children have not been confirmed.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Adalat while you are pregnant. It is not known if Adalat is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Adalat, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Adalat: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect while using Adalat such as:

worsening angina;

feeling like you might pass out;

feeling short of breath, swelling in your hands or feet;

fast or pounding heartbeats;

numbness or tingly feeling;

jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or

chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling.

Less serious side effects may include:

headache, dizziness;

drowsiness, tired feeling;

nausea, constipation, diarrhea, stomach pain;

sleep problems (insomnia);

mild rash or itching;

joint pain, leg cramps;

warmth, redness, or tingly feeling under your skin; or

urinating more than usual.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider.

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Vehicle Range - Toyota South Africa, Avanza

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Erectile Dysfunction Buy Brand Viagra At, Erosfil

Erectile Dysfunction

Brand Viagra (Erosfil)

Viagra is indicated for the treatment of erectile dysfunction in men. Viagra is a phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor. It works by helping to increase blood flow into the penis during sexual stimulation. This helps you to achieve and maintain an erection.

Use Viagra as directed by your doctor.

Take Viagra by mouth with or without food. Viagra may not work as quickly if you take it with a high-fat meal.

Viagra is usually taken about 1 hour before sexual activity; however, it may be taken anywhere from 4 hours to a half hour before sexual activity. Talk with your doctor about the best way to take Viagra.

Viagra can help you have an erection when sexual stimulation occurs. An erection will not occur just by taking a pill.

Do not take more than the recommended dose or take it more often than once daily, or as directed by your doctor.

If you miss a dose of Viagra and you still intend to engage in sexual activity, take it as soon as you remember. Continue to take it as directed by your doctor.

For most patients, the recommended dose is 50 mg taken, as needed, approximately 1 hour before sexual activity. However, Viagra may be taken anywhere from 4 hours to 0.5 hour before sexual activity. Based on effectiveness and toleration, the dose may be increased to a maximum recommended dose of 100 mg or decreased to 25 mg. The maximum recommended dosing frequency is once per day.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Viagra.

Store Viagra at 77 degrees F (25 degrees C). Brief storage at temperatures between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C) is permitted. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Viagra out of the reach of children and away from pets.

Active Ingredient: Sildenafil citrate.

Inactive Ingredients: Microcrystalline cellulose, anhydrous dibasic calcium phosphate, croscarmellose sodium, magnesium stearate, hypromellose, titanium dioxide, lactose, triacetin, and FD & C Blue #2 aluminum lake.

Do NOT use Viagra if:

you are allergic to any ingredient in Viagra

you have been advised by your doctor to avoid sexual activity because of heart problems

you are taking nitrates (eg, isosorbide, nitroglycerin) in any form (eg, tablet, capsule, patch, ointment), or nitroprusside

you use certain recreational drugs called "poppers" (eg, amyl nitrate or nitrite, butyl nitrate or nitrite)

you take another PDE5 inhibitor (eg, tadalafil, vardenafil) or another medicine that contains sildenafil.

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Some medical conditions may interact with Viagra. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement

if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances

if you have a deformed penis (eg, cavernosal fibrosis, Peyronie disease), blood cell problems (eg, leukemia, multiple myeloma, sickle cell anemia), or any other condition that may increase the risk of a prolonged erection (priapism)

if you have a history of a prolonged (more than 4 hours) or painful erection (priapism)

if you have a history of certain eye problems (eg, macular degeneration, optic neuropathy, retinitis pigmentosa, sudden vision loss in one or both eyes) or hearing problems (eg, ringing in the ears, decreased hearing, hearing loss)

if you have a history of liver or kidney problems, lung problems (eg, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease), high or low blood pressure, ulcers, bleeding problems, heart problems (eg, angina, aortic stenosis, heart failure, irregular heartbeat), or blood vessel problems

if you have a history of heart attack, stroke, or life-threatening irregular heartbeat, especially within the past 6 months.

Some medicines may interact with Viagra. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Alpha-blockers (eg, doxazosin), medicines for high blood pressure, nitrates (eg, isosorbide, nitroglycerin), or nitroprusside because severe low blood pressure with dizziness, lightheadedness, and fainting may occur

Azole antifungals (eg, itraconazole, ketoconazole), H 2 antagonists (eg, cimetidine), HIV protease inhibitors (eg, ritonavir, saquinavir), macrolide antibiotics (eg, erythromycin), narcotic analgesics (eg, dihydrocodeine), or telithromycin because they may increase the risk of Viagra's side effects

Bosentan or rifampin because they may decrease Viagra's effectiveness.

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Viagra may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

Important safety information:

Viagra may cause dizziness, drowsiness, fainting, or blurred vision. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Viagra with caution. Do not drive or perform other possible unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it.

Viagra may cause dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting; alcohol, hot weather, exercise, or fever may increase these effects. To prevent them, sit up or stand slowly, especially in the morning. Sit or lie down at the first sign of any of these effects.

Patients with heart problems who take Viagra may be at increased risk for heart-related side effects, including heart attack or stroke. Symptoms of a heart attack may include chest, shoulder, neck, or jaw pain; numbness of an arm or leg; severe dizziness, headache, nausea, stomach pain, or vomiting; fainting; or vision changes. Symptoms of a stroke may include confusion, vision or speech changes, one-sided weakness, or fainting. Contact your doctor or seek medical attention right away if you experience these symptoms.

Viagra may rarely cause a prolonged (eg, more than 4 hours) or painful erection. This could happen even when you are not having sex. If this is not treated right away, it could lead to permanent sexual problems such as impotence. Contact your doctor right away if you have an erection that lasts more than 4 hours.

Viagra does not stop the spread of HIV or other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) to others through sexual contact. Use barrier methods of birth control (eg, condoms) if you have HIV infection or an STD.

Viagra will not prevent pregnancy. If your partner may become pregnant and you wish to avoid pregnancy, be sure to use an effective form of birth control.

Viagra may uncommonly cause mild, temporary vision changes (eg, blurred vision, sensitivity to light, blue/green color tint to vision). Contact your doctor if vision changes persist or are severe.

Rarely, an eye problem called nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) has been reported in patients who took Viagra. This may lead to decreased vision or permanent loss of vision in some cases. If you notice a sudden decrease in vision or loss of vision in one or both eyes, contact your doctor right away.

Sudden decreases in hearing and loss of hearing have been reported in some patients who have taken Viagra. Sometimes they also noticed ringing in the ears or dizziness. If you notice a sudden decrease or loss of hearing, contact your doctor right away.

Do not use other medicines or treatments for ED while you are taking Viagra without first checking with your doctor.

Use Viagra with caution in the elderly; they may be more sensitive to its effects.

Viagra is not recommended for use in children younger than 18 years old.

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects.

Check with your doctor if any of these most common side effects persist or become bothersome:

Diarrhea; dizziness; flushing; headache; heartburn; stuffy nose; upset stomach.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these severe side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); chest pain; fainting; fast or irregular heartbeat; memory loss; numbness of an arm or leg; one-sided weakness; painful or prolonged erection; ringing in the ears; seizure; severe or persistent dizziness; severe or persistent vision changes; sudden decrease or loss of hearing; sudden decrease or loss of vision in one or both eyes.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider.

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Nizoral - Anti Fungal, Mycofebrin

Product Description Common use Nizoral is an antifungal antibiotic used to treat serious fungal or yeast infections, such as candidiasis, blastomycosis, coccidioidomycosis, histoplasmosis, chromoblastomycosis, or paracoccidioidomycosis. Nizoral kills sensitive fungi by interfering with the formation of the fungal cell membrane. Also Nizoral is used to treat parasitic fungal infections on the skin that cannot be treated with topical medicine or griseofulvin, or for patients who cannot take griseofulvin.

Dosage and direction Take it orally with food or milk at the same time each day. The recommended starting dose for adults is 200 mg once a day. Dosage for 2-year-old children is based on body weight. A single daily dose varies from 3.3 to 6.6 mg/kg. Do not use it without doctor's permission and dose has to be prescribed just after consulting your doctor. For children under the age of 2, use it just after doctor's permission and dose has to be prescribed after consulting your doctor. Note: this instruction presented here just for review. It's very necessary to consult your doctor before using.

Precautions Liver problems may occur while you are taking this medicine. If you experience one of this symptoms as dark urine; abdominal pain or tenderness; clay-colored stools; nausea and vomiting; decreased appetite; skin rash; fever; headache; itching; loss of appetite; swelling of the feet or lower legs; unusual tiredness or weakness; or yellow eyes or skin call your doctor immediately. Nizoral should not be used during pregnancy, becoming pregnant or lactating without doctor's advice. Do not use this drug before breast-feeding without doctor's permission.

Nizoral is not allowed to people who are hypersensitive to any components of this medication. Also it is contraindicated with terfenadine, astemizole, triazolam, cisapride.

Possible side effect They may include an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Also the most possible side effects include: dizziness, fainting, fast or pounding heartbeat; easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness; numbness or tingly feeling; severe depression, confusion, or thoughts of hurting yourself; or nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, weakness, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes). Less serious include: mild nausea, vomiting, or stomach pain; mild itching or skin rash; headache; dizziness; breast swelling; or impotence or loss of interest in sex. If you experience one of them stop using Nizoral and tell your doctor as soon as possible. Also consult with your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual.

Drug interaction Nizoral interact with follow list of drugs: acetaminophen (Tylenol); cyclosporine (Gengraf, Sandimmune, Neoral); digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin); tacrolimus ((Prograf); loratadine (Alavert, Claritin, Tavist ND); methylprednisolone (Medrol); phenytoin (Dilantin); rifampin (Rifadin, Rifater, Rifamate, Rimactane); diabetes medication you take by mouth; a sedative such as midazolam (Versed); a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin); cancer medications; birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy; methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall); cholesterol medications such as niacin (Advicor), atorvastatin (Lipitor), lovastatin (Altocor, Mevacor), simvastatin (Zocor), and others; or medications to treat HIV or AIDS. Also note that interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. As usual it affects the the effect of drugs, so consult with your doctor about how it interactions are being managed or should be managed.

Missed dose If you forgot to take your dose in time, please do it as soon as you remember. But do not take if it is too late or almost time for your next dose. Do not take double or extra doses. Take your usually dose next day in the same regularly time.

Symptoms of Nizoral overdose are not known well, but if you experience any unusual symptoms call your doctor immediately. Also in the event of accidental over-dosage, supportive measures, including gastric lavage with sodium bicarbonate, should be employed.

Storage Store at room temperature between 59-77 degrees F (15-25 degrees C) away from light and moisture, kids and pets. Do not use after expiration term.

Disclaimer We provide only general information about medications which does not cover all directions, possible drug integrations, or precautions. Information at the site cannot be used for self-treatment and self-diagnosis. Any specific instructions for a particular patient should be agreed with your health care adviser or doctor in charge of the case. We disclaim reliability of this information and mistakes it could contain. We are not responsible for any direct, indirect, special or other indirect damage as a result of any use of the information on this site and also for consequences of self-treatment.

Product Description Common use Nizoral is an antifungal antibiotic used to treat serious fungal or yeast infections, such as candidiasis, blastomycosis, coccidioidomycosis, histoplasmosis, chromoblastomycosis, or paracoccidioidomycosis. Nizoral kills sensitive fungi by interfering with the formation of the fungal cell membrane. Also Nizoral is used to treat parasitic fungal infections on the skin that cannot be treated with topical medicine or griseofulvin, or for patients who cannot take griseofulvin.

Dosage and direction Take it orally with food or milk at the same time each day. The recommended starting dose for adults is 200 mg once a day. Dosage for 2-year-old children is based on body weight. A single daily dose varies from 3.3 to 6.6 mg/kg. Do not use it without doctor's permission and dose has to be prescribed just after consulting your doctor. For children under the age of 2, use it just after doctor's permission and dose has to be prescribed after consulting your doctor. Note: this instruction presented here just for review. It's very necessary to consult your doctor before using.

Precautions Liver problems may occur while you are taking this medicine. If you experience one of this symptoms as dark urine; abdominal pain or tenderness; clay-colored stools; nausea and vomiting; decreased appetite; skin rash; fever; headache; itching; loss of appetite; swelling of the feet or lower legs; unusual tiredness or weakness; or yellow eyes or skin call your doctor immediately. Nizoral should not be used during pregnancy, becoming pregnant or lactating without doctor's advice. Do not use this drug before breast-feeding without doctor's permission.

Nizoral is not allowed to people who are hypersensitive to any components of this medication. Also it is contraindicated with terfenadine, astemizole, triazolam, cisapride.

Possible side effect They may include an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Also the most possible side effects include: dizziness, fainting, fast or pounding heartbeat; easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness; numbness or tingly feeling; severe depression, confusion, or thoughts of hurting yourself; or nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, weakness, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes). Less serious include: mild nausea, vomiting, or stomach pain; mild itching or skin rash; headache; dizziness; breast swelling; or impotence or loss of interest in sex. If you experience one of them stop using Nizoral and tell your doctor as soon as possible. Also consult with your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual.

Drug interaction Nizoral interact with follow list of drugs: acetaminophen (Tylenol); cyclosporine (Gengraf, Sandimmune, Neoral); digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin); tacrolimus ((Prograf); loratadine (Alavert, Claritin, Tavist ND); methylprednisolone (Medrol); phenytoin (Dilantin); rifampin (Rifadin, Rifater, Rifamate, Rimactane); diabetes medication you take by mouth; a sedative such as midazolam (Versed); a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin); cancer medications; birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy; methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall); cholesterol medications such as niacin (Advicor), atorvastatin (Lipitor), lovastatin (Altocor, Mevacor), simvastatin (Zocor), and others; or medications to treat HIV or AIDS. Also note that interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. As usual it affects the the effect of drugs, so consult with your doctor about how it interactions are being managed or should be managed.

Missed dose If you forgot to take your dose in time, please do it as soon as you remember. But do not take if it is too late or almost time for your next dose. Do not take double or extra doses. Take your usually dose next day in the same regularly time.

Symptoms of Nizoral overdose are not known well, but if you experience any unusual symptoms call your doctor immediately. Also in the event of accidental over-dosage, supportive measures, including gastric lavage with sodium bicarbonate, should be employed.

Storage Store at room temperature between 59-77 degrees F (15-25 degrees C) away from light and moisture, kids and pets. Do not use after expiration term.

Disclaimer We provide only general information about medications which does not cover all directions, possible drug integrations, or precautions. Information at the site cannot be used for self-treatment and self-diagnosis. Any specific instructions for a particular patient should be agreed with your health care adviser or doctor in charge of the case. We disclaim reliability of this information and mistakes it could contain. We are not responsible for any direct, indirect, special or other indirect damage as a result of any use of the information on this site and also for consequences of self-treatment.

Product Description Common use Nizoral is an antifungal antibiotic used to treat serious fungal or yeast infections, such as candidiasis, blastomycosis, coccidioidomycosis, histoplasmosis, chromoblastomycosis, or paracoccidioidomycosis. Nizoral kills sensitive fungi by interfering with the formation of the fungal cell membrane. Also Nizoral is used to treat parasitic fungal infections on the skin that cannot be treated with topical medicine or griseofulvin, or for patients who cannot take griseofulvin.

Dosage and direction Take it orally with food or milk at the same time each day. The recommended starting dose for adults is 200 mg once a day. Dosage for 2-year-old children is based on body weight. A single daily dose varies from 3.3 to 6.6 mg/kg. Do not use it without doctor's permission and dose has to be prescribed just after consulting your doctor. For children under the age of 2, use it just after doctor's permission and dose has to be prescribed after consulting your doctor. Note: this instruction presented here just for review. It's very necessary to consult your doctor before using.

Precautions Liver problems may occur while you are taking this medicine. If you experience one of this symptoms as dark urine; abdominal pain or tenderness; clay-colored stools; nausea and vomiting; decreased appetite; skin rash; fever; headache; itching; loss of appetite; swelling of the feet or lower legs; unusual tiredness or weakness; or yellow eyes or skin call your doctor immediately. Nizoral should not be used during pregnancy, becoming pregnant or lactating without doctor's advice. Do not use this drug before breast-feeding without doctor's permission.

Nizoral is not allowed to people who are hypersensitive to any components of this medication. Also it is contraindicated with terfenadine, astemizole, triazolam, cisapride.

Possible side effect They may include an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Also the most possible side effects include: dizziness, fainting, fast or pounding heartbeat; easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness; numbness or tingly feeling; severe depression, confusion, or thoughts of hurting yourself; or nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, weakness, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes). Less serious include: mild nausea, vomiting, or stomach pain; mild itching or skin rash; headache; dizziness; breast swelling; or impotence or loss of interest in sex. If you experience one of them stop using Nizoral and tell your doctor as soon as possible. Also consult with your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual.

Drug interaction Nizoral interact with follow list of drugs: acetaminophen (Tylenol); cyclosporine (Gengraf, Sandimmune, Neoral); digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin); tacrolimus ((Prograf); loratadine (Alavert, Claritin, Tavist ND); methylprednisolone (Medrol); phenytoin (Dilantin); rifampin (Rifadin, Rifater, Rifamate, Rimactane); diabetes medication you take by mouth; a sedative such as midazolam (Versed); a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin); cancer medications; birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy; methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall); cholesterol medications such as niacin (Advicor), atorvastatin (Lipitor), lovastatin (Altocor, Mevacor), simvastatin (Zocor), and others; or medications to treat HIV or AIDS. Also note that interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. As usual it affects the the effect of drugs, so consult with your doctor about how it interactions are being managed or should be managed.

Missed dose If you forgot to take your dose in time, please do it as soon as you remember. But do not take if it is too late or almost time for your next dose. Do not take double or extra doses. Take your usually dose next day in the same regularly time.

Symptoms of Nizoral overdose are not known well, but if you experience any unusual symptoms call your doctor immediately. Also in the event of accidental over-dosage, supportive measures, including gastric lavage with sodium bicarbonate, should be employed.

Storage Store at room temperature between 59-77 degrees F (15-25 degrees C) away from light and moisture, kids and pets. Do not use after expiration term.

Disclaimer We provide only general information about medications which does not cover all directions, possible drug integrations, or precautions. Information at the site cannot be used for self-treatment and self-diagnosis. Any specific instructions for a particular patient should be agreed with your health care adviser or doctor in charge of the case. We disclaim reliability of this information and mistakes it could contain. We are not responsible for any direct, indirect, special or other indirect damage as a result of any use of the information on this site and also for consequences of self-treatment.

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Die sexuelle Erlebnisfahigkeit der Frau ist gegenuber dem mannlichen Reaktionszyklus vielfaltiger und leichter etionamida. Sexuelle Storungen spiegeln oft partnerschaftliche Schwierigkeiten wider.

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Articulos de interes:

Buscar/Search/Chercher:

Donde/Where/Ou

Bendit, planchas de asar.

Mosen Cinto Verdaguer, 3 25100 Almacelles (Lleida) Tel. (34) 973 26 93 96 bendit@bendit. es www. bendit. es

Terrafin - Skylanders Wiki, Ternafin

Terrafin

Skylanders can use abilities depending on their level .

Jibjab (Primary Attack): Press (Y) repeatedly to punch. If Terrafin connects with an enemy, keep pressing (Y) to finish with an overhead attack and an uppercut.

Earth Mover (Secondary Attack): Press (X) to pull up the ground beneath Terrafin, sending a dangerous shockwave forward. Terrafin can also Burrow (A) into enemies to damage them and knock them into the air.

Chompion (requires level: 2): Burrow (A) into an enemy, then release (A) to make Terrafin burst out of the ground and bite his foe. Press (Y) while Burrowing to pop up at any time.

Granitefist (requires level: 5): Damage an enemy with a shockwave (X) to cover Terrafin's fists in stone, increasing his punch (Y) damage for a few seconds.

Earth Surge (requires level: 8): Press (Y), (Y), (Y), (Y) to punch an enemy and finish with an uppercut. If the uppercut hits, Terrafin will trigger an Earth Surge and move faster for a few seconds. During an Earth Surge, Burrow (A) to end the surge and damage nearby enemies.

Quotes

Battle Cries

"It's Feeding Time!"

"Oh yeah!"

"Yeah!"

"Yes!"

"Nice!"

"Earthquake!"

"Let's go!"

"All right!"

"Punches and punches!"

"Big money for the champ!"

"Where's my five dollars?"

"Not so tough are you?"

"Who wants an autograph?"

"The defended champion!"

"King of the ring!"

"Here I come!"

"Stickin' and moving!"

"Gotcha on the ropes!"

"A perfect record!" - when checking stats

"Let's go to the scorecard."

"Wahoo! I'm a real knockout!" - when given a hat

"Gotta look good for the fans!"

"Every fighter needs a nickname!" - when given a nickname

"That's a name with some punch!"

Commercial Quotes

"Oh, he got hosed!" - Terrafin commenting on Gill Grunt 's performance in Gill Grunt's TV Spot commercial.

"It's on, brotha!" - Boomtime commercial.

"I'm going belly-up: BOOM!" - from The Beginning Trailer

"That guy owes me five dollars!" - from The Beginning Trailer

"Shoot, Eruptor !" - from Boomtime Trailer

"Prism Break meet Stump Smash !" - from Tag Team Commercial

"I do not want to be that guy."

"Really, you heard the Giants are huge? Check it out, this is my sarcastic face." - Giants E3 2012 Trailer

"Bad Idea!"

"I did NOT see that one coming!"

"It's an Easter Egg hunt, if we hide, they'll come find us!- from Easter commercial

"Hot Dog. where are you?"

"Man, that's too obvious!

"Hey, you seen Shroomboom.

"There coming, there coming, there coming!

"I'm getting shark bumps!" - Extended Just Like Swap Force trailer

"Best day of my life!" - Boom Party commercial

"Hey, check out Fire Kraken. Stick it to 'em!" - Hitting the Wall commercial

Book Quotes

Terrafin Battles the Boom Brothers

"Get ready to pay up. Easiest money I've ever made."

"Yeah, I bet you five dollars that you'll be laughing on the other side of your face by the end of the day. fool."

"Sonic Boom! Screech, sister!"

Character Trailers

Knockout Terrafin in the Fiery Forge Battle Pack

Trivia

Terrafin's name is a play on terrapin, a type of freshwater turtle.

One time Terrafin and Doom Stone had a contest to see who was the strongest, Terrafin started by lifting a huge boulder. Doom Stone then lifted the boulder but with only one hand. Terrafin then lifted both Doom Stone and the boulder, then Doom Stone began juggling Terrafin and the boulder. Eventually they settled on an arm wrestling contest, after 4 days of arm wrestling they both quit. [4]

He may be one of the toughest of all Skylanders, but Terrafin is afraid of flying. [5]

Terrafin was originally called Finn in the early beta gameplay of Skylanders: Spyro's Adventure .

While swimming underground using his Earth Swim attack, Terrafin hums a song he wrote years earlier, which some people think sounds similar to Lady Gaga 's song, Bad Romance. [6]

In his earlier promotional art, Terrafin is shown to be blue and white, but yet in his toy form and in the game he is gray and white.

According to Terrafin in the Beginning Trailer , Kaos owes him five dollars.

This is because in Terrafin Battles the Boom Brothers . Terrafin bet Kaos five dollars that the evil Portal Master would be laughing on the other side of his face by the end of the day. The Skylanders were victorious in their battle against Kaos that day, and Terrafin reminded the Portal Master that he owes the dirt shark five dollars thanks to the bet. [7]

When Terrafin collects a Treasure Chest in Giants . he says "Where's my five dollars?"

In the Toy Fair 2011 debut trailer of Spyro's Adventure . Terrafin's toy form is different from the final version.

Terrafin is one of the ten Skylanders who can summon helpers (others include Sonic Boom. Double Trouble. Warnado. Pop Fizz. and Eye-Brawl ).

There is a glitch than when burrowing underground with Terrafin, if you happen to burrow underneath food, he will eat it (once you get his Soul Gem Ability) but his health will not replenish.

The same will happen if he touches Good Magic (in Wilikin Village and Bringing Order to Kaos! ).

He can collect Good Magic without getting his Soul Gem ability.

Despite being a Dirt Shark, Terrafin doesn't possess a tail, which is a trait commonly seen on most dirt shark inhabitants seen in Skylanders: Swap Force .

When Terrafin swims underground, he is invulnerable to most attacks for a short period of time. However, in Trap Team . Terrafin's invulnerability while digging has been excluded.

His voice actor in The Beginning trailer, Chris Williams, currently voices Crunch Bandicoot and Tiny Tiger from the Crash Bandicoot series. Williams started voicing Crunch in Crash Tag Team Racing in 2005, and he started voicing Tiny in Crash of the Titans in 2007.

References

^ Skylanders Universe: The Complete Collection, page 36

^ Skylanders: Terrafin Battles the Boom Brothers, Head to Head, page 158

^ Skylanders Official Sticker Book, page 10

^ Skylanders: Universe - Book of Elements: Air & Earth, page 77

^ Skylanders: Universe - Book of Elements: Air & Earth, page 55

^ The 27 Hidden Secrets of Skylanders

^ Skylanders: Terrafin Battles the Boom Brothers, page 115

Pents, Pents

The Positive Environments, Network of Trainers is a California Positive Behavior Initiative designed to provide information and resources for educators striving to achieve high educational outcomes through the use of proactive positive strategies. Evidence-based positive practices and helpful information is disseminated statewide through this website.

Our collaborative PENT network is dedicated to increasing academic achievement and overcoming behavioral barriers to success for all students with and without disabilities.

All materials can be reproduced for non-commercial purpose for staff training.

All forms and documents have now been updated to reflect AB 86 which repealed the Title 5, California Code of Regulations . Section 3001(d), (e), (f), (g), and (ab) and Section 3052, formerly known as the “Hughes Bill” regulations.

PENT Peer-Reviewed Research

Valerie Johnson Director, Diagnostic Center, Southern California

Diana Browning Wright PENT Director Emeritus dbrowningw@gmail. com

Minocin - Fda Prescribing Information, Side Effects And Uses, Minocyclini

Minocin

To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of Minocin ® (minocycline hydrochloride) Pellet-Filled Capsules and other antibacterial drugs, Minocin ® (minocycline hydrochloride) Pellet-Filled Capsules should be used only to treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by bacteria.

Minocin Description

Minocin ® minocycline hydrochloride, is a semisynthetic derivative of tetracycline, 4,7 - Bis(dimethylamino) - 1,4,4a,5,5a,6,11,12a - octahydro - 3,10,12,12a - tetrahydroxy - 1,11 - dioxo - 2 - naphthacenecarboxamide monohydrochloride.

Its structural formula is:

Minocin ® Pellet-Filled Capsules for oral administration contain pellets of minocycline HCl equivalent to 50 mg or 100 mg of minocycline in microcrystalline cellulose.

The capsule shells contain the following inactive ingredients: Blue 1, Gelatin, Titanium Dioxide and Yellow 10. The 50 mg capsule shells also contain Black and Yellow Iron Oxides.

Minocin - Clinical Pharmacology

Following a single dose of two Minocin ® 100 mg pellet-filled capsules administered to 18 normal fasting adult volunteers, maximum serum concentrations were attained in 1 to 4 hours (average 2.1 hours) and ranged from 2.1 to 5.1 µg/mL (average 3.5 µg/mL). The serum half-life in the normal volunteers ranged from 11.1 to 22.1 hours (average 15.5 hours).

When Minocin ® Pellet-Filled Capsules were given concomitantly with a high-fat meal, which included dairy products, the extent of absorption of Minocin ® Pellet-Filled Capsules was unchanged compared to dosing under fasting conditions. The mean T max was delayed by one hour when administered with food, compared to dosing under fasting conditions. Minocin ® Pellet-Filled Capsules may be administered with or without food.

In previous studies with other minocycline dosage forms, the minocycline serum half-life ranged from 11 to 16 hours in 7 patients with hepatic dysfunction, and from 18 to 69 hours in 5 patients with renal dysfunction. The urinary and fecal recovery of minocycline when administered to 12 normal volunteers was one-half to one-third that of other tetracyclines.

Microbiology

The tetracyclines are primarily bacteriostatic and are thought to exert their antimicrobial effect by the inhibition of protein synthesis. The tetracyclines, including minocycline, have a similar antimicrobial spectrum of activity against a wide range of gram-positive and gram-negative organisms. Cross-resistance of these organisms to tetracycline is common.

Minocycline has been shown to be active against most strains of the following microorganisms, both in vitro and in clinical infections as described in the INDICATIONS AND USAGE section:

AEROBIC GRAM-POSITIVE MICROORGANISMS

Because many strains of the following gram-positive microorganisms have been shown to be resistant to tetracyclines, culture and susceptibility testing are especially recommended. Tetracycline antibiotics should not be used for streptococcal diseases unless the organism has been demonstrated to be susceptible. Tetracyclines are not the drug of choice in the treatment of any type of staphylococcal infection.

Bacillus anthracis 1

Listeria monocytogenes 1

AEROBIC GRAM-NEGATIVE MICROORGANISMS

Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum 1

Treponema pallidum subspecies pertenue 1

1 When penicillin is contraindicated, tetracyclines are alternative drugs in the treatment of infections caused by the cited microorganisms.

Susceptibility Tests

Susceptibility testing should be performed with tetracycline since it predicts susceptibility to minocycline. However, certain organisms (eg, some staphyloccocci, and Acinetobacter species) may be more susceptible to minocycline and doxycycline than to tetracycline.

Quantitative methods are used to determine antimicrobial minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). These MICs provide estimates of the susceptibility of bacteria to antimicrobial compounds. The MICs should be determined using a standardized procedure. Standardized procedures are based on a dilution method Ref1, Ref3 (broth or agar) or equivalent with standardized inoculum concentrations and standardized concentrations of tetracycline powder. The MIC values should be interpreted according to the following criteria:

For testing aerobic gram-negative microorganisms (Enterobacteriaceae), Acinetobacter species and Staphylococcus aureus :

4 These interpretative standards are applicable only to agar dilution susceptibility testing using GC agar base and 1% defined growth supplements. Ref1

A report of “Susceptible” indicates that the pathogen is likely to be inhibited if the antimicrobial compound in the blood reaches the concentrations usually achievable. A report of “Intermediate” indicates that the result should be considered equivocal, and, if the microorganism is not fully susceptible to alternative, clinically feasible drugs, the test should be repeated. This category implies possible clinical applicability in body sites where the drug is physiologically concentrated or in situations where high dosage of drug can be used. This category also provides a buffer zone which prevents small uncontrolled technical factors from causing major discrepancies in interpretation. A report of “Resistant” indicates that the pathogen is not likely to be inhibited if the antimicrobial compound in the blood reaches the concentrations usually achievable; other therapy should be selected.

Standardized susceptibility test procedures require the use of laboratory control microorganisms to control the technical aspects of the laboratory procedures. Standard tetracycline powder should provide the following MIC values:

MIC Range (µg/mL)

Escherichia coli ATCC 25922

Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212

Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923

Haemophilus influenzae ATCC 49247

Streptococcus pneumoniae ATCC 49619

Neisseria gonorrhoeae ATCC 49226

Quantitative methods that require measurement of zone diameters also provide reproducible estimates of the susceptibility of bacteria to antimicrobial compounds. One such standardized procedure Ref2, Ref3 requires the use of standardized inoculum concentrations. This procedure uses paper disks impregnated with 30 µg tetracycline (class disk) or 30 µg minocycline to test the susceptibility of microorganisms to minocycline.

Reports from the laboratory providing results of the standard single-disk susceptibility test with a 30-µg tetracycline or minocycline disk should be interpreted according to the following criteria:

For testing aerobic gram-negative microorganisms (Enterobacteriaceae), Acinetobacter species and Staphylococcus aureus :

Zone Diameter (mm)

8 These interpretative standards are applicable only to disk diffusion testing performed with a 30-µg tetracycline disk. Ref2

Interpretation should be as stated above for results using dilution techniques. Interpretation involves correlation of the diameter obtained in the disk test with the MIC for tetracycline.

As with standardized dilution techniques, diffusion methods require the use of laboratory control microorganisms that are used to control the technical aspects of the laboratory procedures. For the diffusion technique, the 30-µg tetracycline or minocycline disk should provide the following zone diameters in these laboratory test quality control strains:

Zone Diameter Range (mm)

Escherichia coli ATCC 25922

Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923

Haemophilus influenzae ATCC 49247

Neisseria gonorrhoeae ATCC 49226

Streptococcus pneumoniae ATCC 49619

Indications and Usage for Minocin

Minocin ® Pellet-Filled Capsules are indicated in the treatment of the following infections due to susceptible strains of the designated microorganisms:

Rocky Mountain spotted fever, typhus fever and the typhus group, Q fever, rickettsialpox and tick fevers caused by rickettsiae.

Respiratory tract infections caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae .

Lymphogranuloma venereum caused by Chlamydia trachomatis .

Psittacosis (Ornithosis) due to Chlamydia psittaci .

Trachoma caused by Chlamydia trachomatis. although the infectious agent is not always eliminated, as judged by immunofluorescence.

Inclusion conjunctivitis caused by Chlamydia trachomatis .

Nongonococcal urethritis, endocervical, or rectal infections in adults caused by Ureaplasma urealyticum or Chlamydia trachomatis.

Relapsing fever due to Borrelia recurrentis .

Chancroid caused by Haemophilus ducreyi .

Plague due to Yersinia pestis .

Tularemia due to Francisella tularensis .

Cholera caused by Vibrio cholerae .

Campylobacter fetus infections caused by Campylobacter fetus .

Brucellosis due to Brucella species (in conjunction with streptomycin).

Bartonellosis due to Bartonella bacilliformis .

Granuloma inguinale caused by Calymmatobacterium granulomatis .

Minocycline is indicated for the treatment of infections caused by the following gram-negative microorganisms when bacteriologic testing indicates appropriate susceptibility to the drug:

Respiratory tract infections caused by Haemophilus influenzae .

Respiratory tract and urinary tract infections caused by Klebsiella species.

Minocin ® Pellet-Filled Capsules are indicated for the treatment of infections caused by the following gram-positive microorganisms when bacteriologic testing indicates appropriate susceptibility to the drug:

Upper respiratory tract infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

Skin and skin structure infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus. (Note: Minocycline is not the drug of choice in the treatment of any type of staphylococcal infection.)

When penicillin is contraindicated, minocycline is an alternative drug in the treatment of the following infections:

Uncomplicated urethritis in men due to Neisseria gonorrhoeae and for the treatment of other gonococcal infections.

Infections in women caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae .

Syphilis caused by Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum .

Yaws caused by Treponema pallidum subspecies pertenue .

Listeriosis due to Listeria monocytogenes .

Anthrax due to Bacillus anthracis .

Vincent’s infection caused by Fusobacterium fusiforme .

Actinomycosis caused by Actinomyces israelii .

Infections caused by Clostridium species.

In acute intestinal amebiasis. minocycline may be a useful adjunct to amebicides.

In severe acne. minocycline may be useful adjunctive therapy.

Oral minocycline is indicated in the treatment of asymptomatic carriers of Neisseria meningitidis to eliminate meningococci from the nasopharynx. In order to preserve the usefulness of minocycline in the treatment of asymptomatic meningococcal carriers, diagnostic laboratory procedures, including serotyping and susceptibility testing, should be performed to establish the carrier state and the correct treatment. It is recommended that the prophylactic use of minocycline be reserved for situations in which the risk of meningococcal meningitis is high.

Oral minocycline is not indicated for the treatment of meningococcal infection.

Although no controlled clinical efficacy studies have been conducted, limited clinical data show that oral minocycline hydrochloride has been used successfully in the treatment of infections caused by Mycobacterium marinum .

To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of Minocin ® (minocycline hydrochloride) Pellet-Filled Capsules and other antibacterial drugs, Minocin ® (minocycline hydrochloride) Pellet-Filled Capsules should be used only to treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by susceptible bacteria. When culture and susceptibility information are available, they should be considered in selecting or modifying antibacterial therapy. In the absence of such data, local epidemiology and susceptibility patterns may contribute to the empiric selection of therapy.

Contraindications

This drug is contraindicated in persons who have shown hypersensitivity to any of the tetracyclines or to any of the components of the product formulation.

Warnings

Minocin, LIKE OTHER TETRACYCLINE-CLASS ANTIBIOTICS, CAN CAUSE FETAL HARM WHEN ADMINISTERED TO A PREGNANT WOMAN. IF ANY TETRACYCLINE IS USED DURING PREGNANCY OR IF THE PATIENT BECOMES PREGNANT WHILE TAKING THESE DRUGS, THE PATIENT SHOULD BE APPRISED OF THE POTENTIAL HAZARD TO THE FETUS. THE USE OF DRUGS OF THE TETRACYCLINE CLASS DURING TOOTH DEVELOPMENT (LAST HALF OF PREGNANCY, INFANCY, AND CHILDHOOD TO THE AGE OF 8 YEARS) MAY CAUSE PERMANENT DISCOLORATION OF THE TEETH (YELLOW-GRAY-BROWN).

This adverse reaction is more common during long-term use of the drug but has been observed following repeated short-term courses. Enamel hypoplasia has also been reported. TETRACYCLINE DRUGS, THEREFORE, SHOULD NOT BE USED DURING TOOTH DEVELOPMENT UNLESS OTHER DRUGS ARE NOT LIKELY TO BE EFFECTIVE OR ARE CONTRAINDICATED.

All tetracyclines form a stable calcium complex in any bone-forming tissue. A decrease in the fibula growth rate has been observed in premature human infants given oral tetracycline in doses of 25 mg/kg every six hours. This reaction was shown to be reversible when the drug was discontinued.

Results of animal studies indicate that tetracyclines cross the placenta, are found in fetal tissues, and can have toxic effects on the developing fetus (often related to retardation of skeletal development). Evidence of embryotoxicity has been noted in animals treated early in pregnancy.

Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) including fatal cases have been reported with minocycline use. If this syndrome is recognized, the drug should be discontinued immediately.

The anti-anabolic action of the tetracyclines may cause an increase in BUN. While this is not a problem in those with normal renal function, in patients with significantly impaired function, higher serum levels of tetracycline may lead to azotemia, hyperphosphatemia, and acidosis. Under such conditions, monitoring of creatinine and BUN is recommended, and the total daily dosage should not exceed 200 mg in 24 hours. (See DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION .) If renal impairment exists, even usual oral or parenteral doses may lead to systemic accumulation of the drug and possible liver toxicity.

Photosensitivity manifested by an exaggerated sunburn reaction has been observed in some individuals taking tetracyclines. This has been reported with minocycline.

Central nervous system side effects including light-headedness, dizziness, or vertigo have been reported with minocycline therapy. Patients who experience these symptoms should be cautioned about driving vehicles or using hazardous machinery while on minocycline therapy. These symptoms may disappear during therapy and usually disappear rapidly when the drug is discontinued.

Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD) has been reported with use of nearly all antibacterial agents, including Minocin ®. and may range in severity from mild diarrhea to fatal colitis. Treatment with antibacterial agents alters the normal flora of the colon leading to overgrowth of C. difficile .

C. difficile produces toxins A and B which contribute to the development of CDAD. Hypertoxin producing strains of C. difficile cause increased morbidity and mortality, as these infections can be refractory to antimicrobial therapy and may require colectomy. CDAD must be considered in all patients who present with diarrhea following antibiotic use. Careful medical history is necessary since CDAD has been reported to occur over two months after the administration of antibacterial agents.

If CDAD is suspected or confirmed, ongoing antibiotic use not directed against C. difficile may need to be discontinued. Appropriate fluid and electrolyte management, protein supplementation, antibiotic treatment of C. difficile. and surgical evaluation should be instituted as clinically indicated.

Precautions

General

As with other antibiotic preparations, use of this drug may result in overgrowth of non-susceptible organisms, including fungi. If superinfection occurs, the antibiotic should be discontinued and appropriate therapy instituted.

Pseudotumor cerebri (benign intracranial hypertension) in adults has been associated with the use of tetracyclines. The usual clinical manifestations are headache and blurred vision. Bulging fontanels have been associated with the use of tetracyclines in infants. While both of these conditions and related symptoms usually resolve after discontinuation of the tetracycline, the possibility for permanent sequelae exists.

Hepatotoxicity has been reported with minocycline; therefore, minocycline should be used with caution in patients with hepatic dysfunction and in conjunction with other hepatotoxic drugs.

Incision and drainage or other surgical procedures should be performed in conjunction with antibiotic therapy when indicated.

Prescribing Minocin ® (minocycline hydrochloride) Pellet-Filled Capsules in the absence of a proven or strongly suspected bacterial infection or a prophylactic indication is unlikely to provide benefit to the patient and increases the risk of the development of drug-resistant bacteria.

Information For Patients

Diarrhea is a common problem caused by antibiotics which usually ends when the antibiotic is discontinued. Sometimes after starting treatment with antibiotics, patients can develop watery and bloody stools (with or without stomach cramps and fever) even as late as two or more months after having taken the last dose of the antibiotic. If this occurs, patients should contact their physician as soon as possible.

Photosensitivity manifested by an exaggerated sunburn reaction has been observed in some individuals taking tetracyclines. Patients apt to be exposed to direct sunlight or ultraviolet light should be advised that this reaction can occur with tetracycline drugs, and treatment should be discontinued at the first evidence of skin erythema. This reaction has been reported with use of minocycline.

Patients who experience central nervous system symptoms should be cautioned about driving vehicles or using hazardous machinery while on minocycline therapy. (See WARNINGS .)

Concurrent use of tetracycline with oral contraceptives may render oral contraceptives less effective. (See Drug Interactions .)

Patients should be counseled that antibacterial drugs including Minocin ® (minocycline hydrochloride) Pellet-Filled Capsules should only be used to treat bacterial infections. They do not treat viral infections (eg, the common cold). When Minocin ® (minocycline hydrochloride) Pellet-Filled Capsules are prescribed to treat a bacterial infection, patients should be told that although it is common to feel better early in the course of therapy, the medication should be taken exactly as directed. Skipping doses or not completing the full course of therapy may (1) decrease the effectiveness of the immediate treatment and (2) increase the likelihood that bacteria will develop resistance and will not be treatable by Minocin ® (minocycline hydrochloride) Pellet-Filled Capsules or other antibacterial drugs in the future.

Unused supplies of tetracycline antibiotics should be discarded by the expiration date.

Laboratory Tests

In venereal disease when coexistent syphilis is suspected, a dark-field examination should be done before treatment is started and the blood serology repeated monthly for at least four months.

Periodic laboratory evaluations of organ systems, including hematopoietic, renal, and hepatic, should be performed.

Drug Interactions

Because tetracyclines have been shown to depress plasma prothrombin activity, patients who are on anticoagulant therapy may require downward adjustment of their anticoagulant dosage.

Since bacteriostatic drugs may interfere with the bactericidal action of penicillin, it is advisable to avoid giving tetracycline-class drugs in conjunction with penicillin.

Absorption of tetracyclines is impaired by antacids containing aluminum, calcium, or magnesium, and iron-containing preparations.

The concurrent use of tetracycline and methoxyflurane has been reported to result in fatal renal toxicity.

Concurrent use of tetracyclines with oral contraceptives may render oral contraceptives less effective.

Administration of isotretinoin should be avoided shortly before, during, and shortly after minocycline therapy. Each drug alone has been associated with pseudotumor cerebri. (See PRECAUTIONS .)

Increased risk of ergotism when ergot alkaloids or their derivatives are given with tetracyclines.

Drug/Laboratory Test Interactions

False elevations of urinary catecholamine levels may occur due to interference with the fluorescence test.

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

Dietary administration of minocycline in long term tumorigenicity studies in rats resulted in evidence of thyroid tumor production. Minocycline has also been found to produce thyroid hyperplasia in rats and dogs. In addition, there has been evidence of oncogenic activity in rats in studies with a related antibiotic, oxytetracycline (ie, adrenal and pituitary tumors). Likewise, although mutagenicity studies of minocycline have not been conducted, positive results in in vitro mammalian cell assays (ie, mouse lymphoma and Chinese hamster lung cells) have been reported for related antibiotics (tetracycline hydrochloride and oxytetracycline). Segment I (fertility and general reproduction) studies have provided evidence that minocycline impairs fertility in male rats.

Pregnancy

Pregnancy Category D. (See WARNINGS .)

All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defects, loss, or other adverse outcome regardless of drug exposure. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies on the use of minocycline in pregnant women. Minocycline, like other tetracycline-class antibiotics, crosses the placenta and may cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Rare spontaneous reports of congenital anomalies including limb reduction have been reported in post-marketing experience. Only limited information is available regarding these reports; therefore, no conclusion on causal association can be established. If minocycline is used during pregnancy or if the patient becomes pregnant while taking this drug, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to the fetus.

Labor and Delivery

The effect of tetracyclines on labor and delivery is unknown.

Nursing Mothers

Tetracyclines are excreted in human milk. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from the tetracyclines, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother. (See WARNINGS .)

Pediatric Use

Minocycline is not recommended for the use in children below 8 years of age unless the expected benefits of therapy outweigh the risks. (See WARNINGS .)

Geriatric Use

Clinical studies of oral minocycline did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy. (See WARNINGS. DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION .)

Minocin ® Pellet-Filled Capsules (50 mg and 100 mg) do not contain sodium.

Adverse Reactions

Due to oral minocycline’s virtually complete absorption, side effects to the lower bowel, particularly diarrhea, have been infrequent. The following adverse reactions have been observed in patients receiving tetracyclines.

Body as a whole: Fever, and discoloration of secretions.

Gastrointestinal: Anorexia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dyspepsia, stomatitis, glossitis, dysphagia, enamel hypoplasia, enterocolitis, pseudomembranous colitis, pancreatitis, inflammatory lesions (with monilial overgrowth) in the oral and anogenital regions. Instances of esophagitis and esophageal ulcerations have been reported in patients taking the tetracycline-class antibiotics in capsule and tablet form. Most of these patients took the medication immediately before going to bed. (See DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION .)

Hepatic toxicity: Hyperbilirubinemia, hepatic cholestasis, increases in liver enzymes, fatal hepatic failure, and jaundice. Hepatitis, including autoimmune hepatitis, and liver failure have been reported. (See PRECAUTIONS .)

Skin: Alopecia, erythema nodosum, hyperpigmentation of nails, pruritus, toxic epidermal necrolysis, and vasculitis. Maculopapular and erythematous rashes. Exfoliative dermatitis has been reported. Fixed drug eruptions have been reported. Lesions occurring on the glans penis have caused balanitis. Erythema multiforme and Stevens-Johnson syndrome have been reported. Photosensitivity is discussed above. (See WARNINGS .) Pigmentation of the skin and mucous membranes has been reported.

Respiratory: Cough, dyspnea, bronchospasm, exacerbation of asthma, and pneumonitis.

Renal toxicity: Interstitial nephritis. Elevations in BUN have been reported and are apparently dose related. (See WARNINGS .) Reversible acute renal failure has been reported.

Musculoskeletal: Arthralgia, arthritis, bone discoloration, myalgia, joint stiffness, and joint swelling.

Hypersensitivity reactions: Urticaria, angioneurotic edema, polyarthralgia, anaphylaxis/anaphylactoid reaction (including shock and fatalities), anaphylactoid purpura, myocarditis, pericarditis, exacerbation of systemic lupus erythematosus and pulmonary infiltrates with eosinophilia have been reported. A transient lupus-like syndrome and serum sickness-like reactions also have been reported.

Blood: Agranulocytosis, hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, neutropenia, pancytopenia, and eosinophilia have been reported.

Central Nervous System: Convulsions, dizziness, hypesthesia, paresthesia, sedation, and vertigo. Bulging fontanels in infants and benign intracranial hypertension (pseudotumor cerebri) in adults have been reported. (See PRECAUTIONS – General .) Headache has also been reported.

Other: Thyroid cancer has been reported in the post-marketing setting in association with minocycline products. When minocycline therapy is given over prolonged periods, monitoring for signs of thyroid cancer should be considered. When given over prolonged periods, tetracyclines have been reported to produce brown-black microscopic discoloration of the thyroid gland. Cases of abnormal thyroid function have been reported.

Tooth discoloration in children less than 8 years of age (see WARNINGS ) and also, in adults has been reported.

Oral cavity discoloration (including tongue, lip, and gum) have been reported.

Tinnitus and decreased hearing have been reported in patients on Minocin ® .

The following syndromes have been reported. In some cases involving these syndromes, death has been reported. As with other serious adverse reactions, if any of these syndromes are recognized, the drug should be discontinued immediately:

Hypersensitivity syndrome consisting of cutaneous reaction (such as rash or exfoliative dermatitis), eosinophilia, and one or more of the following: hepatitis, pneumonitis, nephritis, myocarditis, and pericarditis. Fever and lymphadenopathy may be present.

Lupus-like syndrome consisting of positive antinuclear antibody; arthralgia, arthritis, joint stiffness, or joint swelling; and one or more of the following: fever, myalgia, hepatitis, rash, and vasculitis.

Serum sickness-like syndrome consisting of fever; urticaria or rash; and arthralgia, arthritis, joint stiffness, or joint swelling. Eosinophilia may be present.

Overdosage

The adverse events more commonly seen in overdose are dizziness, nausea, and vomiting.

No specific antidote for minocycline is known.

In case of overdosage, discontinue medication, treat symptomatically, and institute supportive measures. Minocycline is not removed in significant quantities by hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis.

Minocin Dosage and Administration

THE USUAL DOSAGE AND FREQUENCY OF ADMINISTRATION OF MINOCYCLINE DIFFERS FROM THAT OF THE OTHER TETRACYCLINES. EXCEEDING THE RECOMMENDED DOSAGE MAY RESULT IN AN INCREASED INCIDENCE OF SIDE EFFECTS.

Minocin ® Pellet-Filled Capsules may be taken with or without food (See CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY .)

Ingestion of adequate amounts of fluids along with capsule and tablet forms of drugs in the tetracycline-class is recommended to reduce the risk of esophageal irritation and ulceration. The pellet-filled capsules should be swallowed whole.

For Pediatric Patients Above 8 Years Of Age

Usual pediatric dose: 4 mg/kg initially followed by 2 mg/kg every 12 hours, not to exceed the usual adult dose.

Adults

The usual dosage of Minocin ® Pellet-Filled Capsules is 200 mg initially followed by 100 mg every 12 hours. Alternatively, if more frequent doses are preferred, two or four 50 mg pellet-filled capsules may be given initially followed by one 50 mg capsule 4 times daily.

Uncomplicated gonococcal infections other than urethritis and anorectal infections in men: 200 mg initially, followed by 100 mg every 12 hours for a minimum of 4 days, with post-therapy cultures within 2 to 3 days.

In the treatment of uncomplicated gonococcal urethritis in men, 100 mg every 12 hours for 5 days is recommended.

For the treatment of syphilis, the usual dosage of minocycline hydrochloride should be administered over a period of 10 to 15 days. Close follow-up, including laboratory tests, is recommended.

In the treatment of meningococcal carrier state, the recommended dosage is 100 mg every 12 hours for 5 days.

Mycobacterium marinum infections: Although optimal doses have not been established, 100 mg every 12 hours for 6 to 8 weeks have been used successfully in a limited number of cases.

Uncomplicated urethral, endocervical, or rectal infection in adults caused by Chlamydia trachomatis or Ureaplasma urealyticum. 100 mg orally, every 12 hours for at least 7 days.

Ingestion of adequate amounts of fluids along with capsule and tablet forms of drugs in the tetracycline-class is recommended to reduce the risk of esophageal irritation and ulceration.

The pharmacokinetics of minocycline in patients with renal impairment (CL CR <80 mL/min) have not been fully characterized. Current data are insufficient to determine if a dosage adjustment is warranted. The total daily dosage should not exceed 200 mg in 24 hours. However, due to the anti-anabolic effect of tetracyclines, BUN and creatinine should be monitored. (See WARNINGS .)

How is Minocin Supplied

Minocin ® Pellet-Filled Capsules are supplied as capsules containing minocycline hydrochloride equivalent to 100 mg and 50 mg minocycline.

100 mg, two-piece, hard-shell capsule with an opaque light green cap and a transparent green body, printed in white ink with “Onset” over “M0100” on one half and “Onset” over “100 mg” on the other half. Each capsule contains pellets of minocycline HCl equivalent to 100 mg of minocycline, supplied as follows:

NDC 16781 - 403 - 50 Bottle of 50

50 mg, two-piece, hard-shell capsule with an opaque yellow cap and a transparent green body, printed in black ink with “Onset” over “M050” on one half and “Onset” over “50 mg” on the other half. Each capsule contains pellets of minocycline HCl equivalent to 50 mg of minocycline, supplied as follows:

NDC 16781 - 400 - 96 Bottle of 100

Store at controlled room temperature 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F).

Protect from light, moisture, and excessive heat.

Dispense in a tight, light-resistant container as defined in the USP.

ANIMAL PHARMACOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY

Minocin ® minocycline HCl has been observed to cause a dark discoloration of the thyroid in experimental animals (rats, minipigs, dogs, and monkeys). In the rat, chronic treatment with minocycline hydrochloride has resulted in goiter accompanied by elevated radioactive iodine uptake and evidence of thyroid tumor production. Minocycline hydrochloride has also been found to produce thyroid hyperplasia in rats and dogs.

REFERENCES

Ref1. National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards, Methods for Dilution Antimicrobial Susceptibility Tests for Bacteria that Grow Aerobically – Fourth Edition; Approved Standard. NCCLS Document M7-A4, Vol. 17, No. 2, NCCLS, 940 West Valley Road, Suite 1400, Wayne, PA, January 1997.

Ref2. National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards, Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Disks Susceptibility Tests – Sixth Edition; Approved Standard NCCLS Document M2-A6, Vol. 17, No. 1, NCCLS, 940 West Valley Road, Suite 1400, Wayne, PA, January 1997.

Ref3. National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards, Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing – Eighth Edition; Approved Standard NCCLS Document M100-S8, Vol. 18, No. 1, NCCLS, 940 West Valley Road, Suite 1400, Wayne, PA, January 1998.

This product’s label may have been updated. For current package insert and further product information, please visit www. Minocin. com or call our toll-free number: 800 978 5060. Call between 9:00 a. m. and 3:00 p. m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday.

PATIENT INFORMATION

Minocin ® [my-no-sin]

Pellet-Filled Capsules, 50 and 100 mg

Read the Patient Information that comes with Minocin ® capsules before you or a family member starts taking it and each time you get a refill. There may be new information. This leaflet does not take the place of talking to your doctor about your medical condition or treatment.

WHAT IS Minocin ®.

Minocin ® is a tetracycline-class antibiotic medicine. Minocin ® is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria. These include infections of the skin, respiratory tract, urinary tract, some sexually transmitted diseases, and others. Minocin ® may be used along with other treatments for severe acne.

Sometimes, other germs, called viruses cause infections. The common cold is a virus. Minocin ®. like other antibiotics, does not treat viruses.

WHO SHOULD NOT USE Minocin ®.

Do not take Minocin ® if you are allergic to minocycline or other tetracycline antibiotics.

Ask your doctor or pharmacist for a list of these medications if you are not sure. See the end of this leaflet for a complete list of ingredients in Minocin ® .

Minocin ® is not recommended for pregnant women or children up to 8 years old because:

• Minocin ® may harm an unborn baby • Minocin ® may permanently turn a baby’s or child’s teeth yellow-gray-brown during tooth development. Tooth development happens in the last half of pregnancy and birth to age 8 years.

WHAT SHOULD I TELL MY DOCTOR BEFORE STARTING Minocin ® CAPSULES?

Tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

• Have liver or kidney problems • Are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. Minocin ® may harm your unborn baby. Stop taking Minocin ® and call your doctor if you become pregnant while taking it. • Are breast feeding. Minocin ® passes into your milk and may harm your baby. You should decide whether to use Minocin ® or breastfeed, but not both.

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you are taking including prescription and non - prescription medications, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Minocin ® and other medicines may interact. Especially tell your doctor if you take:

• Birth control pills. Minocin ® may make your birth control pills less effective • A blood thinner medicine. The dose of your blood thinner may have to be lowered. • A penicillin antibiotic medicine. Minocin ® and penicillins should not be used together. • Migraine medicines called ergot alkaloids • An acne medicine called isotretinoin (Accutane, Amnesteem, Claravis, Sotret) • Antacids that contain aluminum, calcium, or magnesium, or iron-containing products.

Know the medicines you take, keep a list of them to show your doctor and pharmacist each time you get a new medicine.

HOW SHOULD I TAKE Minocin ® CAPSULES?

• Take Minocin ® capsules exactly as your doctor tells you to take them. Skipping doses or not taking all your Minocin ® may: • Decrease the effectiveness of the treatment • Increase the chance that bacteria will develop resistance to Minocin ® • Take Minocin ® with a full glass of liquid. Taking Minocin ® with enough liquid may lower your chance of getting irritation or ulcers in your esophagus. Your esophagus is the tube that connects your mouth to your stomach. • Minocin ® capsules may be taken with or without food. If you forget to take Minocin ®. take it as soon as you remember. • If you take too much Minocin ®. call you doctor or poison control center right away.

WHAT ARE THE POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS OF Minocin ®.

Minocin ® may cause serious side effects. Stop Minocin ® and call your doctor if you have:

• Watery diarrhea • Bloody stools • Stomach cramps • Unusual headaches • Blurred vision • Fever • Rash • Joint pain • Feeling very tired

Minocin ® may also cause:

• Central nervous system effects. Symptoms include light-headedness, dizziness, and a spinning feeling (vertigo). You should not drive or operate machines if you have these symptoms. • Sun sensitivity (photosensitivity). You may get a worse sunburn with Minocin ®. Avoid sun exposure and the use of sunlamps or tanning beds. Protect your skin while out in the sunlight. Stop Minocin ® and call your doctor if your skin turns red.

These are not all the side effects with Minocin ®. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

HOW SHOULD I STORE Minocin ® CAPSULES?

• Store Minocin ® capsules at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture. • Throw away any Minocin ® that is outdated or no longer needed. • Keep Minocin ® capsules and all medicines out of the reach of children.

GENERAL ADVICE ABOUT Minocin ® CAPSULES

Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a Patient Information leaflet. Do not use Minocin ® capsules for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not give Minocin ® capsules to other people, even if they have the same symptoms you have. It may harm them.

This Patient Information leaflet summarizes the most important information about Minocin ®. If you would like more information, talk with your doctor.

Your doctor or pharmacist can give you information about Minocin ® that is written for health care professionals. For more information, you can also call Onset Dermatologics, LLC at 800- 978 5060 Monday through Friday from 9:00 a. m. to 5:00 p. m. Eastern Time.

What are the ingredients in Minocin ® capsules?

Active ingredient: minocycline hydrochloride, 50 mg and 100 mg

Inactive ingredients: Blue 1, gelatin, titanium dioxide and yellow 10. The 50 mg capsule shells also contain black and yellow iron oxides.

Manufactured for Onset Dermatologics, LLC

Cumberland, RI 02864

By Patheon Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Cincinnati, OH 45237

Diafree Capsule In Hyderabad, Telangana, India - Ayushman Herbal Products (India) Pvt, Diafree

Diafree Capsule

Description/ Specification

Ayushman Herbal Diabetic Supplement is an Anti-Diabetic formula made up of natural herbs that helps to get rid of all signs and symptoms associated with diabetes. Ayushman Diafree is natural Ayurvedic Diabetes Medicine Diabetes is a medical condition in which pancreas fail to produce sufficient insulin required for maintaining normal glucose levels in blood. Due to insufficient insulin, blood glucose level rises which leads to diabetes. Ayushman Diafree is an Ayurvedic diabetes medicine combination of herbs that support your pancreas to maintain normal blood glucose level throughout the day. Diafree is a unique combination of herbs that stimulate the beta cell production and helps pancreas to perform its function normally and helps in diabetes treatment. Diafree helps to provide nourishment to the cells, tissues and organs of your body responsible for maintaining normal blood sugar level and you can treat your diabetes in a natural way. You can decrease the dosage of artificial insulin by regularly taking Diafree along with diet and exercise. Diafree also consists of a combination of antioxidants that reduces the complications of other organs such as eyes, kidneys, liver, blood vessels, nerves, feet, which generally occurs in diabetic patients. Diafree is a safe and natural medicine for diabetes and it can be used for a longer time. Diafree is a herbal product that is certified and approved by Department of Ayush.

Contact Information

Diafree Capsule

Description/ Specification

Ayushman Herbal Diabetic Supplement is an Anti-Diabetic formula made up of natural herbs that helps to get rid of all signs and symptoms associated with diabetes. Ayushman Diafree is natural Ayurvedic Diabetes Medicine Diabetes is a medical condition in which pancreas fail to produce sufficient insulin required for maintaining normal glucose levels in blood. Due to insufficient insulin, blood glucose level rises which leads to diabetes. Ayushman Diafree is an Ayurvedic diabetes medicine combination of herbs that support your pancreas to maintain normal blood glucose level throughout the day. Diafree is a unique combination of herbs that stimulate the beta cell production and helps pancreas to perform its function normally and helps in diabetes treatment. Diafree helps to provide nourishment to the cells, tissues and organs of your body responsible for maintaining normal blood sugar level and you can treat your diabetes in a natural way. You can decrease the dosage of artificial insulin by regularly taking Diafree along with diet and exercise. Diafree also consists of a combination of antioxidants that reduces the complications of other organs such as eyes, kidneys, liver, blood vessels, nerves, feet, which generally occurs in diabetic patients. Diafree is a safe and natural medicine for diabetes and it can be used for a longer time. Diafree is a herbal product that is certified and approved by Department of Ayush.

Contact Information

Ortopedie Ostrava, Apromed

ORT-Audax spol. s r. o.

Unikatni lecba ortopedickych onemocneni, zlepseni hojeni pourazovych a pooperacnich stavu

Indikace

Postizeni chrupavek degenerativni a pourazove (artroza) . ne-bakterialni zanet kloubu (vypotky, zmnozeni synovie) . onemocneni a urazy slach (Achilova slacha, tenisovy loket, patni ostruha a dalsi) . poraneni a onemocneni svalu, svalovych uponu (trisla, skokanske koleno apod.) . ramenni kloub — poskozeni rotatorove manzety jak urazove tak degenerativni (opotrebeni) . zanety v oblasti ramenniho kloubu.

Vysledek

Nastartovani, urychleni a znasobeni efektu hojivych procesu po urazech, po operacich a pri degenerativnich onemocnenich – napr. artroze.

Nejsou znamy nezadouci ucinky. Vykon neni hrazen zdravotnimi pojistovnami.

Podminky a cena

K lecbe ci konzultaci je nutne se objednat — 606 771 082.

Konzultace je placena (500,- Kc) . ale tato castka bude odectena od platby za aplikace (pokud pacient lecbu podstoupi) .

Lecba neni hrazena ZP a cena je 1 500,- Kc / injekce . Je vhodne aplikovat 4 – 6 injekci. Doporucujeme aplikovat 5 injekci.

Pred odberem krve doporucujeme:

24 hodin pred odberem dietni rezim (nejist tucna a mastna jidla, nevhodne jsou alkoholicke napoje) . je nutne dodrzovat pitny rezim — dostatecne zavodneni cca 2–2,5 litru tekutin za den (ne dzusy apod. lepe neslazeny caj, mineralka, voda) .

5 hodin pred odberem nejist, je vhodne vypit dostatek tekutin (neslazeny caj, voda!) .

© Ortopedicka ambulance ORT–Audax spol. s r. o. APROMED, MUDr. M. Macak, MUDr. P. Kocian, MUDr. J. Svetlik, Opavska 6116/15, 708 00 Ostrava Poruba.

Tel. 724 831 838, 732 119057, 775 138348, E-mail: ortopedieporuba@seznam. cz | vyrobila: MediaFabrica

Your #1 Choice For Boats For Sale In Maine, Neozith

Your #1 Choice for Boats for Sale in Maine

Hamlin’s Marine wants you to enjoy every moment on the water.

For over twenty years Hamlin’s Marine has delivered on a simple promise… ”If you purchase a boat from Hamlin’s Marine, we’ll always be there when you need us.” Hamlin’s Marine offers convenience and assurance with our locations in Waterville and Hampden, staff of twenty-five dedicated employees, and a fleet of service trucks.

At Hamlin’s we only sell boats that we can stand behind. Our manufacturers include Bennington Pontoons. Stingray. Mastercraft. Cutwater. Northcoast. Puffin. Alumacraft. Achilles. Scout Boats. and Yamaha Outboards. These manufacturers lead the industry in quality construction, and make it easier to serve you when it matters most.

So come on in and choose from our selection of new and used Pontoon Boats, Tow Boats or any other fishing boats or family fun boats. With two easy locations in Waterville, Maine (Boat Sales and Service) or Hampden, Maine (Boat Sales, Service, and Marina) it couldn't get any more convenient. Choose Hamlin’s Marine as your boat dealer, service center, marina, and indoor storage facility, and we promise you’ll make wonderful memories on the water in Maine.

At Hamlin's Marine we stand behind all of our boats for sale in Maine .

Why Buy From Hamlin's Marine:

31 Years in Business

#1 Yamaha Outboard Dealer in New England for 5 Years in a Row

Alumacraft is America's #1 selling Deep V Aluminum Fishing Boat

Multiple Locations to serve you

Fleet of ten service and delivery trucks

Dexagrane Rezeptfrei Kaufen ? Qualitat; ? Mit Niedrigen Preisen; ? Lieferung, Dexagrane

Decadron wird zur Behandlung von bestimmten Bedingungen mit verringert Nebenniere Funktion zugeordnet sind. Es wird auch verwendet, um schwere Entzundung aufgrund bestimmter Bedingungen, einschlie?lich schweres Asthma, schwere Allergien, rheumatoide Arthritis, Colitis ulcerosa, bestimmte Blutkrankheiten, Lupus, Multiple Sklerose, und bestimmten Auges und der Haut zu behandeln. Decadron ist ein Kortikosteroid. Es funktioniert durch eine Verringerung oder Verhinderung der Reaktion des Gewebes zu einer Entzundung. Es andert auch die Reaktion des Korpers auf bestimmte Immunstimulation.

Verwenden Sie Decadron wie von Ihrem Arzt verordnet!

Nehmen Sie Decadron durch den Mund mit Lebensmitteln.

Wenn Sie eine Dosis von Decadron, bringen Sie es so bald wie moglich. Wenn es fast Zeit fur Ihre nachste Dosis ist, uberspringen Sie die vergessene Dosis und gehen Sie zuruck zu Ihrem regelma?igen Dosierungsschema. Nehmen Sie nicht 2 Dosen auf einmal.

Fragen Sie Ihren Arzt Fragen konnen Sie sich daruber, wie Sie Decadron nutzen haben konnen.

Shop Decadron bei Raumtemperatur zwischen 59 und 86 Grad F (15 und 30 Grad C). Lager weg von der Hitze, Feuchtigkeit und Licht. Nicht im Bad. Halten Sie Decadron au?erhalb der Reichweite von Kindern und weg von Haustieren.

Verwenden Sie KEINE Decadron, wenn:

Sie sind allergisch gegen jegliche Zutaten in Decadron

Sie haben eine systemische Pilzinfektion

Sie sind unter Mifepriston

Fragen Sie Ihren Arzt oder Ihre Arztin sofort, wenn einer dieser Punkte auf Sie zutreffen.

Einige medizinische Bedingungen konnen mit Decadron interagieren. Informieren Sie Ihren Arzt oder Apotheker, wenn Sie irgendwelche medizinischen Bedingungen haben, vor allem, wenn einer der folgenden Punkte auf Sie zutrifft:

wenn Sie schwanger sind, planen, schwanger zu werden, oder stillen

wenn Sie verschreibungspflichtige oder nicht verschreibungspflichtige Arzneimittel, pflanzliche Zubereitung oder Nahrungserganzungsmittel

wenn Sie Allergien gegen Medikamente, Nahrungsmittel oder andere Substanzen,

wenn Sie sich fur eine Impfung mit einer Live-Virus-Impfstoff (z. B. Pocken) geplant

wenn Sie eine Unterfunktion der Schilddruse, Leber-oder Nierenerkrankungen, Diabetes oder Colitis ulcerosa

wenn Sie Herzprobleme haben, Osophagitis, Gastritis, Magen-Obstruktion oder Perforation, oder ein Geschwur

wenn Sie eine Geschichte psychischer Probleme (zB Depression), Glaukom, Katarakt oder andere Augenprobleme

wenn Sie eine Herpes-Infektion im Auge oder jede andere Art von Infektion (Bakterien, Pilze oder Viren), haben oder kurzlich hatten Tuberkulose (TB) oder getestet fur Tuberkulose, Masern oder Windpocken positiv.

Einige Arzneimittel konnen mit Decadron interagieren. Informieren Sie Ihren Arzt, wenn Sie andere Arzneimittel einnehmen, vor allem einer der folgenden Eigenschaften sind:

Barbiturate (zB Phenobarbital), Carbamazepin, Hydantoinen (zB Phenytoin) oder Rifampicin, weil sie verringern kann Decadron 's Wirksamkeit

Clarithromycin, Azol-Antimykotika (zB Ketoconazol), Steroid-Kontrazeptiva (zB Desogestrel) oder Troleandomyzin, weil, weil Schwache, Verwirrung, Muskelschmerzen, Gelenkschmerzen, oder niedrigen Blutzuckerspiegel auftreten konnen

Methotrexat oder Sympathomimetika, weil das Risiko der Nebenwirkungen konnen durch Decadron erhoht werden

Hydantoinen (zB Phenytoin), Mifepriston oder Lebendimpfstoffe, weil ihre Wirksamkeit kann durch Decadron verringert werden

Antikoagulantien (zB Warfarin) oder Aspirin, weil ihre Aktionen und Nebenwirkungen kann erhoht oder verringert werden, indem Decadron.

Dies kann nicht eine vollstandige Liste aller Interaktionen, die auftreten konnen. Fragen Sie Ihren Arzt, wenn Decadron mit anderen Medikamenten, die Sie einnehmen. Prufen Sie mit Ihrem Arzt, bevor Sie starten, stoppen, oder andern Sie die Dosis einer Medizin.

Wichtige Sicherheitshinweise:

Decadron kann niedriger die Fahigkeit Ihres Korpers, Infektionen zu bekampfen. Vermeiden Sie den Kontakt mit Menschen, die Erkaltungen oder Infektionen. Informieren Sie Ihren Arzt, wenn Sie Anzeichen einer Infektion wie Fieber, Halsschmerzen, Hautausschlag, oder Schuttelfrost.

Informieren Sie Ihren Arzt oder Zahnarzt, dass Sie Decadron bevor Sie eine arztliche oder zahnarztliche Versorgung, Notfallversorgung, oder eine Operation zu erhalten.

Decadron kann zu einer Erhohung des Blutdrucks, Salz-und Wasserretention und erhohten Kalium-Verlust. Moglicherweise mussen Sie die Verwendung von Salz zu beschranken und einen Kalzium.

Decadron kann Kalzium-Verlust und fordern die Entwicklung von Osteoporose. Nehmen Sie ausreichend Kalzium und Vitamin-D-Praparate.

Diabetes-Patienten - Decadron beeintrachtigen konnen Sie Ihren Blutzucker. Check Blutzucker eng. Fragen Sie Ihren Arzt, bevor Sie die Dosis Ihres Diabetes Medizin zu andern.

Vorsicht ist geboten bei der Verwendung Decadron bei Kindern, sie moglicherweise empfindlicher auf deren Auswirkungen.

Kortikosteroide konnen Wachstumsrate bei Kindern und Jugendlichen in einigen Fallen beeinflussen. Sie konnen regelma?ige Kontrollen Wachstum brauchen, wahrend sie Decadron nehmen.

Schwangerschaft und Stillzeit: Es ist nicht bekannt, ob Decadron kann zu Schadigungen des Fotus verursachen. Wenn Sie schwanger werden, wenden Sie sich an Ihren Arzt. Sie mussen die Vorteile und Risiken der Verwendung Decadron zu diskutieren, wahrend Sie schwanger sind. Decadron ist in der Muttermilch gefunden. Nicht stillen wahrend der Einnahme von Decadron.

Alle Arzneimittel konnen Nebenwirkungen haben, die aber viele Menschen haben keine oder nur geringfugige, Nebenwirkungen. Erkundigen Sie sich bei Ihrem Arzt, wenn dieser am haufigsten auftretenden Nebenwirkungen fortbestehen oder storend empfunden werden:

Schlafstorungen, das Gefuhl einer wirbelnde Bewegung, gesteigerter Appetit, vermehrtes Schwitzen, Verdauungsstorungen, Stimmungsschwankungen, Nervositat.

Arztlich behandeln lassen, sofort, wenn dieser schwere Nebenwirkungen auftreten:

Schwere allergische Reaktionen (Hautausschlag, Nesselsucht, Juckreiz, Atembeschwerden, Engegefuhl in der Brust, Schwellungen im Mund-, Gesichts-, Lippen oder Zunge), Appetitlosigkeit, schwarz, Teerstuhle, Anderungen in der Menstruation, Krampfe, Depressionen, Durchfall; Schwindel, ubertriebenes Gefuhl des Wohlbefindens, Fieber, allgemeine korperliche Beschwerden, Kopfschmerzen, erhohter Druck im Auge, Gelenk-oder Muskelschmerzen, Stimmungsschwankungen, Muskelschwache, Veranderungen der Personlichkeit; anhaltende Halsschmerzen, Erkaltungen oder Fieber; Puffing des Gesichts. starke Ubelkeit oder Erbrechen, Schwellungen der Fu?e oder Beine, ungewohnliche Gewichtszunahme, Erbrechen Material, das aussieht wie Kaffeesatz, Schwache, Gewichtsverlust.

Dies ist keine vollstandige Liste aller Nebenwirkungen, die auftreten konnen.

Kunden, die diesen Artikel gekauft haben, schaffen auch folgende Artikel an.

Urheberrecht © 2004-2016 Alle Rechte vorbehalten

Demazin Syrup Decongestant To Treat Allergies, Demazin Ns

TreatAllergies. com

Demazin Syrup

Demazin Syrup combines a decongestant and antihistamine in one medication that provides relief from the symptoms of colds, hayfever and other allergies. These symptoms include a runny nose, sneezing, sinus and nasal congestion, congestion accompanying glue ear or Eustachian tube blockage, and watery, itchy eyes. Each 5ml of Demazin Syrup contains 1.25mg of Chlorpheniramine maleate and 2.5mg of Phenylephrine hydrochloride as the active ingredients. Chlorpheniramine maleate is an antihistamine that blocks the action of histamine released by the body while Phenylephrine hydrochloride works as a decongestant, reducing swelling and congestion. Demazin Syrup comes in Vanilla and Peach flavour and is available in a 200ml bottle with a child resistant cap.

Product Dosage

Demazin Syrup is not be used by children under 2 years of age without the advice of your doctor or pharmacist.

Children aged from 2 to 4 years can take 4-6ml of Demazin Syrup every 6 to 8 hours.

Children aged from 4 to 6 years can take 6-8ml of Demazin Syrup every 6 to 8 hours.

Children aged from 6 to 12 years can take 8-15ml of Demazin Syrup every 6 to 8 hours.

Adults and Children over 12 years can take 15ml of Demazin Syrup every 6 hours.

Warnings and Precautions:

Consult with your doctor or pharmacist before using Demazin Syrup if you are pregnant or breast-feeding

Consult with your doctor or pharmacist before taking Demazin Syrup if you have liver or severe kidney problems

Consult with your doctor or pharmacist before taking Demazin Syrup if you are currently taking medication for hypertension (high blood pressure), coronary heart disease or depression (MAOIs)

Demazin Syrup is unlikely to cause drowsiness. If, however, you find that you become affected do not drive a vehicle or operate machinery

Avoid Alcohol

Do not use Demazin Syrup if you are allergic to Chlorpheniramine maleate, Phenylephrine hydrochloride, or any of the other ingredients of Demazin Syrup. Demazin Syrup contains methyl hydroxybenzoate and propyl hydroxybenzoate as preservatives. It also contains sorbitol which may have a laxative effect in some people. Demazin Syrup contains sucrose but does not contain lactose or gluten

Keep Demazin Syrup out of the reach of children

In some cases, possible side effects of this medication may include: Headache, Fatigue, Dry mouth

Maintenance: Keep Demazin Syrup in a cool, dry place. Store below 30 degrees Celsius. Protect from direct sunlight

You can order this product by following the link below.

We are no longer accepting orders through treatallergies. com, but you can still purchase from us at our main website below. You'll receive the same excellent service, from the same people.

Demazin Syrup is marketed in New Zealand by Schering-Plough Pty Ltd, Wellington, New Zealand

Mobic - Pain Relief, Meloprol

Mobic is used to relieve the pain and stiffness of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Take Mobic exactly as directed by your physician. It is recommended that you take it with a glass of water and a meal (to avoid an empty stomach).

If you miss a dose of Mobic, then skip it and continue with your regular schedule. However, do not take a double dose to make up for the missed dose.

Store Mobic at room temperature away from heat, light and moisture.

Some of the symptoms of a Mobic overdose include nausea, vomiting, stomach pain and bleeding. In extreme cases, it may lead to a heart attack or even coma. Seek medical attention immediately if you suspect an overdose.

Consult your doctor before starting treatment if you are allergic to aspirin, have asthma or experience difficulty breathing while using Mobic. Do not smoke, have alcohol or take steroidal medications while using this drug. Use only if prescribed.

Do not use Mobic if:

you are allergic to any ingredient in Mobic; you have had a severe allergic reaction (eg, severe rash, hives, trouble breathing, growths in the nose, dizziness) to aspirin or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) (eg, ibuprofen, celecoxib); you have recently had or will be having bypass heart surgery; you have a peptic ulcer; you are in the last 3 months of pregnancy. Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Important : Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Do not take more than the recommended dose or use for longer than prescribed without checking with your doctor. Mobic is an NSAID. Before you start any new medicine, check the label to see if it has an NSAID (eg, ibuprofen) in it too. If it does or if you are not sure, check with your doctor or pharmacist. Do not take aspirin while you are using Mobic unless your doctor tells you to. Lab tests, including kidney function, complete blood cell counts, and blood pressure, may be performed while you use Mobic. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Use Mobic with caution in the elderly; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially stomach bleeding and kidney problems. Caution is advised when using Mobic in children; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially diarrhea, fever, headache, stomach pain, and vomiting. Mobic should be used with extreme caution in children younger than 2 years old; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been determined. Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Mobic may cause harm to the fetus. Do not use it during the last 3 months of pregnancy. If you think you may be pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Mobic while you are pregnant. It is not known if Mobic is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while taking Mobic.

Possible Side Effects

Check with your doctor if any of these most common side effects persist or become bothersome:

constipation; diarrhea; dizziness; gas; headache; heartburn; nausea; stomach upset; trouble sleeping. Seek medical attention right away if any of these severe side effects occur:

severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; trouble breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); bloody or black, tarry stools; change in the amount of urine produced; chest pain; confusion; dark urine; depression; fainting; fast or irregular heartbeat; fever, chills, or persistent sore throat; mental or mood changes; numbness of an arm or leg; one-sided weakness; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin; ringing in the ears; seizures; severe headache or dizziness; severe or persistent stomach pain or nausea; severe vomiting; shortness of breath; sudden or unexplained weight gain; swelling of hands, legs, or feet; unusual bruising or bleeding; unusual joint or muscle pain; unusual tiredness or weakness; vision or speech changes; vomit that looks like coffee grounds; yellowing of the skin or eyes.

Mobic is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor.

Die Barcode Flagge Macht Endlich Sinn, Geakten

Meine Theorie: Das Nexus One muss ja aktiviert werden bei Google, das geht natпїЅrlich пїЅber das Internet und ist aus den geakten Dokumenten hier ersichtlich.

Nun ist es so, dass wenn man den Barcode mit einem Scanner aufruft, dann kommt man zu der registrierten Seite des Benutzers. Das heiпїЅt wenn ich mein Nexus kaufe MUSS ich ihn registrieren und sobald jemand meinen barcode scanned kommt er auf meine Profilseite bei Google, ka obs dafпїЅr jetzt extra noch nen Social Network gibt oder sonst was.

Das ganze sieht auch Technobuffalo so.

Interestingly, the image on the back of the device of the Android mascot holding the barcode flag. when scanned (using AndroidпїЅs own scanning app) reveals the owners Google employeeпїЅs information, and then takes you to a memory game.

dumme frage: wie will man einen code auf der rпїЅckseite des handys scannen (mit einer android app) wenn angenommen das einzige gerпїЅt das man hat eben genau das ist was man scannen will?

das Batterie cover abnehmen?

Irgendwie muss man ja auch an die Batterie kommen, die Simkarte und die SDHC Karte einbauen

hab mich jetzt zu fest aufs iphone konzentriert. xD

aber ich finde die barcodeflagge allgemein stylisch hinten drauf.

Dabei handelt es sich пїЅbrigens nicht um einen Barcode (bar = Streifen), sondern um den sogenannten QR-Code.

ja das wohl richtig mir viel das wort nur nicht ein

d. h. ja aber auch das jedes Battery Cover einzigartig sein muss

d. h. ja aber auch das jedes Battery Cover einzigartig sein muss

das ist ja irgendwie auch doof. denn falls du dein cover mal austauschen musst dann ist ja laut google das handy nicht mehr das deine^^

man soll es ja auch gravieren kпїЅnnen, von daher wird es wohl gleich einzigartig mitgemacht

das lпїЅst aber nicht das problem das du bei nem neuen cover beweisen kannst das das handy dazu deins ist..

aber warten wirs ab bis 05.01.2010

Spannende пїЅberlegung. Ich bin gespannt was es dann wirklich damit auf sich hat.

vielleicht baut Google bei den Netzbetreibern etwas ein um das Handy wie mit dem neuen code reaktivieren zu mпїЅssen. Das wпїЅrde auch das Problem beheben.

Aber das ist eine geniale пїЅberlegung

soweit ich informiert bin, leitet der QR code auf ein internet game von google, fпїЅrs nexus one.

soweit ich informiert bin, leitet der QR code auf ein internet game von google, fпїЅrs nexus one.

das macht das ganze schon viel verstпїЅndlicher und einfacher.

Hoffen wir es stimmt was der Poster da drin schreibt.

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Anorectal Abscess Treatment & Management Approach Considerations, Pharmacologic Therapy, Surgical In

Anorectal Abscess Treatment & Management

Approach Considerations

As a rule, the presence of an abscess is an indication for incision and drainage. Watchful waiting while administering antibiotics is inadequate. Clinical suspicion of anorectal abscess warrants aggressive identification and surgical incision and drainage. Delaying surgical intervention results in chronic tissue destruction, fibrosis, and stricture formation and may impair anal continence. Simple perianal abscesses may be treated in the emergency department (ED); more complex perirectal abscesses are treated by an experienced surgeon in an operating room.

Some surgeons advise performing a complementary colostomy to facilitate management of complex anal fistulas. This may be of some benefit in selected cases, but the perirectal infection may continue despite a diverting colostomy. Adequate drainage of the abscess is the most important factor in controlling progressive perirectal infection.

A patient with a perirectal abscess should be admitted to the surgical service unless other medical conditions or complications from the abscess necessitate a primary medical admission, with the surgeon acting as a consultant. Consider admitting a patient with a perirectal abscess to a medical service with the surgeon as a consultant should be considered if the patient is elderly, febrile, hypotensive, or immunocompromised or has significant comorbidities.

Transfer, if warranted, may be safely carried out if the patient is hemodynamically stable. Instability resulting from a concurrent condition or sepsis makes transfer to another institution inappropriate (and possibly illegal under the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act [EMTALA]) unless transfer to allow delivery of a higher level of care is in the patient’s best interest.

Pharmacologic Therapy

The need for routine use of antibiotics in patients with anorectal abscesses has not been established; they have not been shown to improve healing times or reduce recurrence rates. In most of these patients, therefore, adjuvant medical therapy with antibiotics is considered unnecessary. However, concomitant use of antibiotics may be warranted in patients with conditions such as the following [1].

Systemic inflammatory response or sepsis

Heart valve abnormalities or prostheses

Predisposing or comorbid factors may guide empiric antibiotic selection. If antibiotics are considered, the increasing prevalence of methicillin-resistant S aureus should be taken into account; according to a 2009 study, both vancomycin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole provide excellent coverage. [9]

Surgical Intervention

Preparation

Because of the acute nature of anorectal abscesses, preoperative bowel preparation is not possible and typically is unnecessary.

Tetanus immunity status should be ascertained. When acceptable immunity cannot be established, the currently recommended guidelines for high-risk wounds should be followed.

Adequate analgesia before aspiration is mandatory. Lidocaine 2% with epinephrine injected subcutaneously over and around the periphery of the abscess and intramuscular (IM) or intravenous (IV) narcotics are recommended. Ethylene chloride spray applied to the suspected area immediately before aspiration may also help decrease the discomfort of aspiration. The cooling effect of ethylene chloride renders pain receptors temporarily unable to transmit pain signals to the cerebral cortex.

Conscious is also an option if the physician is trained and prepared to manage the airway. If this route is taken, cardiac monitoring, pulse oximetry, and airway management equipment must be available, including suctioning devices, bag-valve-mask, and endotracheal intubation equipment. This technique should be used only by physicians highly skilled in cardiac and airway management.

Management of abscess

Treatment of anorectal abscesses involves early surgical drainage of the purulent collection. [32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38] Primary antibiotic therapy alone is ineffective in resolving the underlying infection and simply postpones surgical intervention. Any delay in surgical intervention prolongs infection and augments tissue damage, and it may impair sphincter continence function and promote stricture or fistula formation. The ability to drain an anorectal abscess depends on patient comfort and on the location and accessibility of the abscess.

When the abscess is perianal or superficial, drainage can usually be accomplished in the office or ED with local anesthesia. A small incision is made over the area of fluctuance; to shorten the length of any fistula that may form, the incision should be made as close to the anus as is compatible with safety. [1] Pus is collected and sent for culture. Hemostasis is achieved with manual pressure, and the wound is packed with iodophor gauze.

After 24 hours, the gauze is removed, and the patient is instructed to take sitz baths 3 times a day and after bowel movements. Postoperative analgesics and stool softeners are prescribed to relieve pain and prevent constipation. Typically, the patient follows up with the physician in 2-3 weeks for wound evaluation and inspection for possible fistula-in-ano. (A short fistula-in-ano coursing through a minimal amount of external sphincter is best treated with a fistulotomy.)

The formation of fistulous tracts (see below) is an important potential complication of anorectal abscess drainage. The type of organism cultured from an anorectal abscess is an important predictor of fistula formation after surgical incision and drainage. Underlying anal fistulas are present in 40% of abscess cultures that are positive for intestinal bacteria; however, cultures growing Staphylococcus species are associated with perianal skin infections and typically indicate that there is no risk of subsequent fistula formation.

Treatment of ischiorectal, intersphincteric, and supralevator abscesses typically requires general or regional anesthesia. To drain an ischiorectal abscess, a cruciate incision is made at the site of maximal swelling. Pus is drained and cultured. The ischiorectal fossa is probed with a finger or hemostat to disrupt loculations and facilitate drainage. Placement of a drain is indicated only for the management of complex or bilateral abscesses.

To drain an intersphincteric abscess, a transverse incision is made in the anal canal below the dentate line posteriorly. The intersphincteric space is identified, and the plane between the internal and external sphincters is exposed. The abscess is opened to allow drainage, and a small mushroom catheter is sutured in situ to assist drainage and prevent premature wound closure.

The optimal drainage technique for a supralevator abscess is determined by the location and etiology of the lesion. Failure to take the primary etiology into account in the management of a supralevator abscess may lead to iatrogenic fistula formation. Evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) can exclude intra-abdominal or pelvic pathology as possible sources.

If the supralevator abscess evolved from the extension of an ischiorectal abscess, external drainage through the ischiorectal fossa would be indicated. If the abscess resulted from an upward extension of an intersphincteric abscess, appropriate drainage would be created through the rectal mucosa.

In cases of posterior supralevator abscess collections, a transverse incision is made in the posterior anal canal below the dentate line. The dissection extends from the intersphincteric plane through the puborectalis sling and into the posterior anal space. A mushroom catheter is then sutured in place to ensure adequate drainage.

Anterior supralevator abscesses are superficial and are more common in women than in men. Surgical drainage may be accomplished via an anteriorly directed transanal incision or by way of a transvaginal approach entering the posterior cul-de-sac. A mushroom catheter is placed to ensure adequate drainage of the abscess collection. Patients with systemic signs of toxicity are admitted to the hospital and treated with IV antibiotics.

If the patient’s clinical condition does not improve over the following 24-48 hours, reevaluation of the supralevator abscess by means of CT or reoperation may be indicated. Some patients with recurrent, severe supralevator abscesses may require a diverting colostomy for optimal management. [39]

Management of fistula

Although the anal fistula has been reported since the time of Hippocrates, there is little systematic evidence to establish optimal management. Different treatment modalities have been evaluated in more than 400 reported trials. Approaches that have been researched include the following:

Fistulotomy versus fistulectomy

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Hyman N, O'Brien S, Osler T. Outcomes after fistulotomy: results of a prospective, multicenter regional study. Dis Colon Rectum . 2009. 52:2022-7. [Medline].

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Smereck J, Ybarra M. Acute hip pain and inability to ambulate: a rare presentation for perirectal abscess. Am J Emerg Med . 2011 Mar. 29(3):356.e1-3. [Medline].

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Erhan Y, Sakarya A, Aydede H, Demir A, Seyhan A, Atici E. A case of large mucinous adenocarcinoma arising in a long-standing fistula-in-ano. Dig Surg . 2003. 20(1):69-71. [Medline].

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Buchanan GN, Halligan S, Bartram CI, Williams AB, Tarroni D, Cohen CR. Clinical examination, endosonography, and MR imaging in preoperative assessment of fistula in ano: comparison with outcome-based reference standard. Radiology . 2004 Dec. 233(3):674-81. [Medline].

Domkundwar SV, Shinagare AB. Role of transcutaneous perianal ultrasonography in evaluation of fistulas in ano. J Ultrasound Med . 2007 Jan. 26(1):29-36. [Medline].

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Peng KT, Hsieh MC, Hsu WH, Li YY, Yeh CH. Anterior ilioinguinal incision for drainage of high-located perianal abscess. Tech Coloproctol . 2012 Sep 28. [Medline].

Buddicom E, Jamieson A, Beasley S, King S. Perianal abscess in children: aiming for optimal management. ANZ J Surg . 2012 Jan-Feb. 82(1-2):60-2. [Medline].

Galandiuk S, Kimberling J, Al-Mishlab TG, et al. Perianal Crohn disease: predictors of need for permanent diversion. Ann Surg . 2005 May. 241(5):796-801; discussion 801-2. [Medline]. [Full Text] .

Guidi L, Ratto C, Semeraro S, et al. Combined therapy with infliximab and seton drainage for perianal fistulizing Crohn's disease with anal endosonographic monitoring: a single-centre experience. Tech Coloproctol . 2008 Jun. 12(2):111-7. [Medline].

Malik AI, Nelson RL. Surgical management of anal fistulae: a systematic review. Colorectal Dis . 2008 Jun. 10(5):420-30. [Medline].

Yeung JM, Alistair J, Simpson D, et al. Fibrin glue for the treatment of fistulae in ano - a method worth sticking to. Colorectal Dis . 2009 Feb 7. [Medline].

Gupta PJ. Anal fistulotomy using radiowaves - long-term outcome. Acta Chir Iugosl . 2008. 55(3):115-8. [Medline].

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Vytorin - Cholesterol Lowering, Krustat

Cholesterol Lowering - Krustat (Brand name: vytorin)

Vytorin (Ezetimibe/Simvastatin) is used for reducing total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides and for increasing HDL cholesterol.

Vytorin is available in a 20 mg dosage ( 10 mg of ezetimibe and 10 mg of simvastatin) and in a 30 mg dosage (10 mg of ezetimibe, and 20 mg of simvastatin).

The recommended dose range of Vytorin is 10/10 mg to 10/80 mg, and it is administered once daily in the evening with or without food. Therapy is usually initiated with 10/20 mg daily, but individuals who need more than a 55% reduction in LDL cholesterol can be started on 10/40 mg daily.

Drug Class and Mechanism

Vytorin is a combination of ezetimibe (Zetia) and simvastatin (Zocor) that is used for treating high levels of cholesterol in the blood. Vytorin reduces total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol while it increases high density lipoprotein cholesterol. The ezetimibe component of Vytorin lowers blood cholesterol by blocking the absorption of cholesterol, including dietary cholesterol, from the intestine. It does not affect the absorption of triglycerides. The simvastatin component of Vytorin belongs to a class of drugs called HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, commonly called "statins". Statins reduce cholesterol by blocking an enzyme in the liver (HMG-CoA reductase) that produces cholesterol. Statins lower total and LDL cholesterol in the blood as well as triglycerides. They also increase HDL cholesterol. LDL cholesterol is believed to be an important cause of coronary artery disease. Lowering LDL cholesterol levels slows and may even reverse coronary artery disease. Raising HDL cholesterol levels also may slow down coronary artery disease. Vytorin was approved by the FDA in July, 2004.

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Vytorin should be stored at room temperature, 20-25 degrees C (68-77 degrees F).

Before taking ezetimibe/simvastatin, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you think you are allergic to it; or to other drugs called "statins"; or if you have any other allergies. This medication should not be used if you have certain medical conditions. Before using this medicine, consult your doctor or pharmacist if you have: active liver disease. Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: heart disease, history of liver disease, kidney disease, underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism), poorly controlled diabetes, alcohol use. Developing severe muscle damage, which is rare, can sometimes lead to serious kidney problems (see the Side Effects section in this handout). This medication is usually temporarily stopped if you have any condition which can increase your risk of developing kidney problems. Before you stop taking your medication, notify your doctor immediately if you have any of the following conditions: major surgery, trauma, serious illness (e. g. sepsis or severe metabolic, endocrine, or electrolyte disorders), very low blood pressure, uncontrolled seizures. Limit alcoholic beverages. Daily use of alcohol may increase your chance for serious side effects. Caution is advised when using this drug in the elderly because they may be more sensitive to its side effects, especially muscle damage. This medication must not be used during pregnancy. If you become pregnant or think you may be pregnant, inform your doctor immediately. It is recommended that young girls and women of child-bearing age use effective birth control to prevent pregnancy while taking this drug. One of these drugs (simvastatin) may cause harm to your unborn child. It is not known if either drug passes into breast milk. A drug similar to simvastatin passes into breast milk, and because of this drug's potential risk of undesirable effects on a nursing infant, breast-feeding is not recommended while using ezetimibe/simvastatin. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Possible Side Effects

Headache may occur. If this effect persists or worsens, notify your doctor or pharmacist promptly. This drug can sometimes cause muscle damage. Although uncommon, this may lead to very serious muscle damage called rhabdomyolysis, which in rare cases can be fatal. Seek immediate medical attention if you develop: muscle pain/tenderness/weakness (especially with fever or unusual tiredness). Tell your doctor immediately if any of these highly unlikely but very serious side effects occur: yellowing eyes and skin, dark urine, severe fatigue, stomach/abdominal pain, persistent nausea, change in the amount of urine. A serious allergic reaction to this drug is unlikely, but seek immediate medical attention if it occurs. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction include: rash, itching, swelling, dizziness, trouble breathing. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Do not share this medication with others. Laboratory and/or medical tests (e. g. blood cholesterol levels, liver function tests) should be performed periodically to monitor your progress or check for side effects. Consult your doctor for more details. For best results, this product should be used along with exercise, a low-cholesterol or low-fat diet, and a weight-loss program if you are overweight. Also to help reduce your risk of heart attacks and strokes, check your blood pressure regularly, seek medical treatment if your blood pressure is high, and stop smoking. Consult your doctor for more details.

Generic & Active Ingredient, Gripakin

Aspirin

Aspirin substance

For use in the temporary relief of various forms of pain, inflammation associated with various conditions (including rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, osteoarthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis), and is also used to reduce the risk of death and/or nonfatal myocardial infarction in patients with a previous infarction or unstable angina pectoris.

Aspirin pharmacology

Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is an analgesic, antipyretic, antirheumatic, and anti-inflammatory agent.

Aspirin's mode of action as an antiinflammatory and antirheumatic agent may be due to inhibition of synthesis and release of prostaglandins.

Aspirin appears to produce analgesia by virtue of both a peripheral and CNS effect.

Peripherally, Aspirin acts by inhibiting the synthesis and release of prostaglandins.

Acting centrally, it would appear to produce analgesia at a hypothalamic site in the brain, although the mode of action is not known.

Aspirin also acts on the hypothalamus to produce antipyresis; heat dissipation is increased as a result of vasodilation and increased peripheral blood flow.

Aspirin's antipyretic activity may also be related to inhibition of synthesis and release of prostaglandins.

Aspirin action

The analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin are due to actions by both the acetyl and the salicylate portions of the intact molecule as well as by the active salicylate metabolite.

Aspirin directly and irreversibly inhibits the activity of both types of cyclo-oxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) to decrease the formation of precursors of prostaglandins and thromboxanes from arachidonic acid.

This makes aspirin different from other NSAIDS (such as diclofenac and ibuprofen) which are reversible inhibitors.

Salicylate may competitively inhibit prostaglandin formation.

Aspirin's antirheumatic (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory) actions are a result of its analgesic and anti-inflammatory mechanisms; the therapeutic effects are not due to pituitary-adrenal stimulation.

The platelet aggregation–inhibiting effect of aspirin specifically involves the compound's ability to act as an acetyl donor to the platelet membrane; the nonacetylated salicylates have no clinically significant effect on platelet aggregation.

Aspirin affects platelet function by inhibiting the enzyme prostaglandin cyclooxygenase in platelets, thereby preventing the formation of the aggregating agent thromboxane A2.

This action is irreversible; the effects persist for the life of the platelets exposed.

Aspirin may also inhibit formation of the platelet aggregation inhibitor prostacyclin (prostaglandin I2) in blood vessels; however, this action is reversible.

Osteonat, Osteonat

Presentation

« Devenir osteopathe, c’est beaucoup plus qu’assimiler un ensemble de connaissances ou de perfectionner des techniques specifiques. C’est tout un processus de developpement qui permet de devenir un instrument intuitif, perceptif, susceptible de s’accorder au patient et a tout ce qui est cache en lui. Il s’agit de devenir apte a repondre aux besoins les plus profonds de celui-ci. » Viola Frymann

La formation en osteopathie perinatale concue par la structure de formation « osteonatfc » s’est peaufinee au cours de pres de 20 annees d’enseignement et de pratique de l’osteopathie aupres de nouveaux-nes et de nourrissons dans des structures hospitalieres de la region de Paris et au contact du milieu medical et universitaire specialise. Plus de 7000 consultations de nouveaux-nes de moins de 4 jours et autant de femmes enceintes et en post partum realisees et plusieurs centaines de traitements de grands prematures nous ont permis d’observer la richesse, la complexite mais surtout l’interet considerable de l’apport osteopathique pour ameliorer la sante immediate des nouveaux-ne mais aussi la sante des futurs adultes. L’osteopathie est une medecine particulierement appropriee a la structure en construction et en developpement du nourrisson. Le concept osteopathique y trouve toute son sens et y exprime toute sa puissance, a condition d’adapter la prise en charge et la methodologie, dans le respect de la relation therapeutique aupres d’un patient involontaire.

Cette formation permettra d’apprehender les particularites d’approche de la parturiente et les aspects neurologiques, orthopediques, emotionnels et neuromoteurs du nouveau-ne en etat de difficulte fonctionnelle aussi bien qu’en etat de handicap. Cette formation permettra egalement d’envisager differemment la prise en charge de l’adulte incluant la dimension prenatale de son organisation dysfonctionnelle Les trois intervenants possedent tous une solide experience en osteopathie comme en pediatrie neonatale et vous feront partager leur passion pour la clinique osteopathique perinatale.

Intervenants

Michele BARROT

Osteopathe DO Diplome Universitaire « douleur en perinatalite » Paris VII Charge de cours a Paris VII Denis Diderot « DU osteopathie perinatale » Attache a l’hopital public d’Argenteuil

Jean-Marie BRIAND

Osteopathe DO MROF Charge d’enseignement en osteopathie en France et a l’etranger Charge d’enseignement a Paris VII denis Diderot Attache a la maternite de l’Hopital prive d’Antony

Diplome en 1992, Osteopathe en Region Parisienne depuis une vingtaine d’annees, je suis osteopathe attache a la maternite de l’Hopital Prive d’Antony depuis 12 ans; J’ai enseigne pendant plus de 10 ans, jusqu’en 2003, dans un etablissement de formation initiale, principalement l’osteopathie dans le champs cranien et le concept osteopathique; je continue de participer a l’enseignement initial en etant regulierement superviseur clinique dans un dispensaire dependant d’une ecole de la region parisienne.

Le contact regulier avec les autres praticiens de perinatalite m’a fait prendre conscience de la reelle proximite sur le terrain, de l’approche osteopathique et des preoccupations des equipes perinatales, ainsi que de l’absence d’interet des querelles osteopathe/allopathe (qui concernent principalement les autorites professionnelles); nos annees de collaboration ont ete enrichissantes mutuellement, sans faire la moindre concession sur la specificite de notre approche.

On est toutefois oblige de remarquer (pour l’avoir enseigne longtemps) que l’arsenal technique dont disposent les jeunes praticiens n’est pas adapte a l’approche du nouveau-ne, peu enclin a accepter « l’administration » de techniques.

C’est pourquoi depuis maintenant 6 ans nous essayons de replacer l’osteopathie dans sa reelle dimension clinique, AVEC et non plus CONTRE les autres acteurs de ce domaine. Cela necessite toutefois pour chaque osteopathe une reflexion sur sa propre pratique, avec une recherche parfois moins technicienne, en se rapprochant plus des origines de notre art.

Thierry LEBOURSIER

Osteopathe DO MRO (France - Bresil) Co-fondateur d’OSTEONAT (formation en osteopathie perinatale) President-fondateur du Collectif de developpement de l’osteopathie perinatale CDOP Responsable d’enseignement au DU d’osteopathie perinatale (Universite Paris VII-Denis Diderot) Diplome Universitaire « douleur en perinatalite » Paris VII Clinique Ambroise Pare de Bourg la reine

Osteopathe liberal a Paris depuis 1990, d’abord charge de cours (formation initiale temps plein) en osteopathie cranienne. techniques fonctionnelles, chaines musculaires, osteopathie en pediatrie et ORL entre 1993 et 2003. osteopathe de la maternite Ambroise Pare de Bourg la Reine depuis 2000, charge de cours a Paris V depuis 2000 (anatomie) et depuis 2009 a Paris VII (douleur en perinatal).Responsable de l’enseignement osteopathique du DU « osteopathie appliquee a la perinatalite » depuis 2010 (Paris VII). J’enseigne depuis 2005 uniquement dans le cadre post gradue en France et a l Etranger dans le cadre de l’approche osteopathique de la perinatalite, l’ORL et l Orthodontie.

Programme de formation :

Historique de notre abord conceptuel : Problematique du recrutement. Methodologie de recrutement par le dossier, limites. Recrutement par l’evaluation fonctionnelle, limites. Difficultes d’evaluation prospective, voire de programmation. Approche Conceptuelle du Nouveau-ne : Traitement de la vie f?tale ou de la naissance ? Importance de l ’ environnement liquide difference entre la « physiologie articulaire » neo-natale et celle de l’adulte Importance des rapports contenant/contenu.

Caracteristiques du nouveau-ne, moyens d’evaluation : Presentation sur le nouveau-ne

Motifs de consultation les plus frequents chez le nourrisson : Plagiocephalie. agitation, regurgitations. « coliques » du nourrisson »….

Psychopathologie de la grossesse et de la parentalite, place de l’osteopathie: Marie Camille GENET, docteur en psychologie et en psychopathologie, Psychologue clinicienne,

Assistante de Recherches Cliniques Unite de Recherche RePPEr Recherche en Psychiatrie et en Psychopathologie perinatale a Erasme, EPS Erasme

Chef de service de l’espace rencontre mediation (ERM) de CITheA, Paris

Responsable de formation en psychologie perinatale au Centre d’Ouverture Psychologique et Sociale (COPES) ( www. copes. fr) vous fera approcher les aspects cliniques de la maternite et de la parentalite, et les difficultes inherentes a la pratique osteopathique dans le domaine perinatal.

Oralite: Monique HADDAD orthophoniste

Attachee d’enseignement au DUEFO, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris VI, a l’ecole d’orthophonie des universites de medecine de Poitiers et Tours. se penchera sur les differents aspects de l’oralite et l’importance de la mise en place de la succion deglutition du nouveau-ne premature et a terme.

Particularites de l’abord therapeutique du Nouveau-ne : Alain BENOIT Pediatre, neo-natalogiste

collabore depuis des annees avec des osteopathes en maternite; il a beaucoup etudie le lien therapeutique, le lien parents - enfant et le lien parent - parent. Son experience dans l’approche pediatrique du nouveau-ne et son interet pour l’osteopathie serviront au stagiaire a etablir un lien entre ce que l’approche clinique a d’incontournable en ce qui concerne le nouveau-ne, et la recherche de donnees osteopathiques.

Troubles fonctionnels de la succion deglutition du nouveau-ne diagnostics differentiels diagnostic et traitements osteopathiques

Accouchement, impact sur le f?tus : Rappel sur l’accouchement eutocique. Accouchements differents. siege, extractions, expression abdominale, Analgesie Peridurale, cesarienne.

Abord des dysfonctions selon qu’elles sont f?tales ou obstetricales : F?tales. oligoamnios, cesariennes, jumeaux, siege… Obstetricales. Dysfonctions embryologiques : Developpement et deductions. Aspect fluidique

Approche osteopathique de la grossesse et des suites de couches : Evolution posturale du corps. Interet d’un suivi osteopathique dans le cadre de la grossesse, dans une visee eutocique. Interet du suivi osteopathique en suite de couches CONCLUSION : Quels axes de progression pour les osteopathes ? Les sequences theoriques (rappels ou justification des propos) sont majoritairement basees sur des presentations informatiques. Des sequences pratiques ainsi que des consultations filmees commentees viendront les illustrer.

Health Canada Releases Summary Report Of Controversial Drug Diane-35, Diane-35

Health Canada releases summary report of controversial drug Diane-35

After months of public debate and criticism over secrecy, Health Canada shared its first public drug review on Tuesday: a brief summary of a controversial acne pill linked to 13 deaths of young women, which raises more questions than it answers.

The 10-paragraph synopsis on Diane-35 is supposed to shed light on the data Health Canada considered when it concluded that the medication’s benefits outweigh its risks. But a prominent drug safety researcher called the assessment “highly problematic” and “quite limited” in scope.

“The summary really does not provide any detailed information on effectiveness or safety that would help prescribers or patients make a decision about whether to use this medicine,” said Barbara Mintzes, an assistant professor at University of British Columbia who has investigated the widespread, off-label use of Diane-35 for birth control.

About 40,000 Canadian women are on the pill, which is approved for use only for patients with what is considered otherwise untreatable acne, Health Canada reported.

A Toronto Star investigation into Diane-35 and the sudden death of Calgary teenager Marit McKenzie last January triggered the unprecedented public release of federal drug safety reviews.

Article Continued Below

The Canada Vigilance database, a voluntary reporting system that tracks drug-related side effects, as of May 2013 included 12 fatalities of young women whose deaths were suspected of being caused by Diane-35.

Two of these cases, however, according to the summary report released on Tuesday, did not contain enough detail to confirm a “possible” correlation with the drug.

McKenzie’s death is the 13th, Health Canada officials confirmed. Though her case was reported to the federal database by a hospital pharmacist and her family shortly after her sudden death on Jan. 28, 2013, it did not appear in the computer system until after Health Canada concluded its review and is not reflected in the review.

The first-year University of Calgary student died of complications from a massive blood clot two days before France suspended sales of the drug. The drug was re-introduced in January of this year after a review by Europe’s health regulator, though France voted against the move.

For months, the Star and McKenzie’s family pressed Health Canada for access to its safety review of Diane-35, which concluded the drug’s benefits outweighed its risks. Health Canada refused, citing “confidential business information,” until newly appointed Health Minister Rona Ambrose stepped in last October. four days after the first article was published.

“Greater access to easy to understand and credible information about the potential risks and appropriate use of health products is one of the most valuable safety tools we can provide Canadians and healthcare professionals,” Ambrose said on Tuesday in a written statement.

Mintzes says the summary report, while easy to read, falls well short of providing important data.

“Generally the report fails to address the question of whether this drug is providing any substantial advantages to health that outweighs the additional potential for harm, as compared to low-risk oral contraceptives or other alternatives for acne,” Mintzes said.

“It is mainly providing a rationale for the decision not to withdraw it from the market based on two things: the risks having been a concern for a long time rather than being a new problem; and the existence of other birth control pills that also have a poor safety profile in terms of risks of blood clots. However, these are not even named, so it doesn’t allow the prescriber or the patient to know which pill is lower risk, which to avoid.”

Full review reports are available upon request to Health Canada’s Marketed Health Products Directorate. These reports are subject to redactions of personal and confidential information, Health Canada said. The Star requested a copy on Tuesday and is awaiting a response.

Mintzes questioned why the report seems to examine only the drug’s risk of blood clotting rather than the full body of evidence on serious harmful effects that have been noted in pre-market clinical trials, observational studies and adverse event case reports.

When Diane-35 was being considered for marketing in Canada and was at first rejected, the main safety concern was the potential for one of the drug’s key ingredients to cause liver cancer, Mintzes said.

In the United Kingdom, the drug’s label includes a warning about depression and other psychiatric side effects.

It is not sold in the United States. Mintzes said reviewers should have consulted the Food and Drug Administration in the United States to ask whether the company that makes the drug, now Bayer Inc. applied for approval to market the drug and, if it was refused, on what grounds.

It’s unknown whether Health Canada investigators took this step.

Health Canada won’t say how many drug safety review summaries it plans to post, or how often. What is known is that the release of Diane-35 is likely an anomaly as the department told the Star it has no further plans to publish reviews that were completed prior to 2014.

“The plan is not to go retrospectively to publish reviews that we have (done),” said Dr. Supriya Sharma, a senior medical adviser with Health Canada.

A federal document obtained by the Star last week that outlines Health Canada’s plans to roll out the drug review summaries revealed it would publish information in three phases, starting with high-profile cases.

Bruce McKenzie takes some comfort in the fact that there is now a little more public information about the drug suspected of killing his 18-year-old daughter, but it’s not enough, he said.

“Health Canada is basically patting itself on the back, saying we’ve done a great job, but the bottom line remains: How does information about serious side effects get to the public? Where is the connect between what the pharmacies publish when they dispense medications and what Health Canada says?”

McKenzie is referring to the fact that not all pharmacies warn patients equally about drug risks in the drug safety pamphlets they hand out.

While many major pharmacies highlight the “very serious” and “sometimes fatal” risk of blood clotting connected with Diane-35 on the drug information sheets they supply to patients, Shoppers Drug Mart does not. Instead, it advises patrons, his daughter included, to watch out for less-serious risks of headaches, tender breasts, menstrual pain, swelling and a lowered sex drive

In December, the McKenzie family filed a lawsuit against Shoppers. It has not yet gone to court.

NDP health critic Libby Davies called Ambrose’s new transparency initiative “a mini-step of progress” that fails to measure up to the minister’s promise of “complete change” in the way Health Canada does business.

“All of the information should be readily available,” Davies said. “You shouldn’t have to ask for it. Canadians have a right to know.”

Buy Dilbloc - Carvedilol - Online Without Prescriptions, Dilbloc

Coreg (Dilbloc)

Coreg is used for treating high blood pressure or certain types of heart failure. It may also be used after a heart attack to improve survival in certain patients. It may be used along with other medicines. Coreg is an alpha - and beta-blocker. It works by relaxing the blood vessels, slowing down the heart, and decreasing the amount of blood it pumps out. This decreases blood pressure, helps the heart pump more efficiently, and reduces the workload on the heart.

Use Coreg as directed by your doctor.

Take Coreg by mouth with food.

Take Coreg on a regular schedule to get the most benefit from it. Taking Coreg at the same time each day will help you remember to take it.

Continue to take Coreg even if you feel well. Do not miss any doses.

Do not suddenly stop taking Coreg. You may have an increased risk of side effects. If you need to stop Coreg or add a new medicine, your doctor will gradually lower your dose.

If you miss a dose of Coreg, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Coreg.

Store Coreg below 86 degrees F (30 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Coreg out of the reach of children and away from pets.

Active Ingredient: Carvedilol.

Do NOT use Coreg if:

you are allergic to any ingredient in Coreg

you have a very slow heartbeat, certain types of irregular heartbeat (eg, moderate to severe heart block, sick sinus syndrome), or very severe heart failure (eg, requires treatment in a hospital)

you have asthma or other severe breathing problems

you have severe liver problems

you are taking mibefradil.

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Some medical conditions may interact with Coreg. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding

if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement

if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances or are taking medicine for allergies

if you have a history of other heart problems (eg, heart failure, slow or irregular heartbeat, angina) or low blood pressure

if you have a history of liver or kidney problems, blood vessel disease, blood flow problems (eg, in the legs or feet), lung or breathing problems (eg, chronic bronchitis emphysema, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), diabetes, low blood sugar, thyroid problems, or glaucoma

if you have an adrenal gland tumor (pheochromocytoma)

if you will be having surgery.

Some medicines may interact with Coreg. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Mibefradil because the risk of serious heart side effects may be increased

Many prescription and nonprescription medicines (eg, used for infections, inflammation, aches and pains, high blood pressure, heart problems, irregular heartbeat, diabetes, depression, mental or mood problems, immune system suppression, allergic reactions, asthma, high cholesterol, seizures), multivitamin products, and herbal or dietary supplements (eg, herbal teas, coenzyme Q10, garlic, ginseng, ginkgo, St. John's wort) may interact with Coreg, increasing the risk of side effects.

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Coreg may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

Important safety information:

Coreg may cause dizziness, fainting, or blurred vision. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Coreg with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibl unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it.

Coreg may cause dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting. These effects may occur within the first hour after you take your dose. They may be more likely when you start taking Coreg or if your dose is increased. Alcohol, hot weather, exercise, or fever may increase these effects. To prevent them, sit up or stand slowly, especially in the morning. Sit or lie down at the first sign of any of these effects. Tell your doctor if these effects occur.

Do not take more than the recommended dose without checking with your doctor.

Do not suddenly stop taking Coreg. Sharp chest pain, irregular heartbeat, and sometimes heart attack may occur if you suddenly stop Coreg. The risk may be greater if you have certain types of heart disease. Your doctor should slowly lower your dose over several weeks if you need to stop taking it. This should be done even if you only take Coreg for high blood pressure. Heart disease is common and you may not know you have it. Limit physical activity while you are lowering your dose. If new or worsened chest pain or other heart problems occur, contact your doctor right away. You may need to start taking Coreg again.

Patients who take medicine for high blood pressure often feel tired or run down for a few weeks after starting treatment. Be sure to take your medicine even if you may not feel "normal." Tell your doctor if you develop any new symptoms.

Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Coreg before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery.

If you have a history of any severe allergic reaction, talk with your doctor. You may be at risk for an even more severe allergic reaction if you come into contact with the substance that caused your allergy. Some medicines used to treat severe allergies may also not work as well while you are using Coreg.

Diabetes patients - Coreg may affect your blood sugar. Check blood sugar levels closely. Ask your doctor before you change the dose of your diabetes medicine.

Diabetes patients - Coreg may hide signs of low blood sugar, such as a rapid heartbeat. Be sure to watch for other signs of low blood sugar. Low blood sugar may make you anxious, sweaty, weak, dizzy, drowsy, or faint. It may also make your vision change; give you a headache, chills, or tremors; or make you more hungry. Check blood sugar levels closely. Ask your doctor before you change the dose of your diabetes medicine.

Lab tests, including blood pressure and heart function, may be performed while you use Coreg. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments.

Use Coreg with caution in the elderly; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially dizziness.

Coreg should be used with extreme caution in children younger 18 years; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Coreg while you are pregnant. It is not known if Coreg is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while taking Coreg.

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects.

Check with your doctor if any of these most common side effects persist or become bothersome:

Diarrhea; dizziness; dry eyes; fatigue; headache; lightheadedness; nausea; numbness or tingling of the hands or feet; vomiting; weakness.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these severe side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue; unusual hoarseness); change in the amount of urine produced; chest pain; disorientation; fainting; fever; irregular or unusually slow heartbeat; persistent or severe vision changes; severe dizziness; shortness of breath; sudden, unusual weight gain; swelling of the hands, ankles, or feet; unusual bruising or bleeding.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider.

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Alcipro Tablet - Uses, Side-Effects, Reviews, Composition, Interactions, Precautions, Substitutes, A

Alcipro Tablet

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Avoid exposure to strong sunlight or artificial UV light

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Following are the uses, perceived effectiveness and perceived side-effects incidence information reported by website visitor for Alcipro Tablet:

User reported uses

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Fenacidon Ohne Rezept, Fenacidon

Diclofenac ohne rezept

Diclofenac is used primarily for the treatment of inflammation and pain caused by conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. It is also effective in treating soft tissue inflammations due to tendinitis and bursitis, and treating dysmenorrhea (menstrual cramps). Diclofenac is an NSAID. NSAIDs treat the symptoms of pain and inflammation. They do not treat the disease that causes those symptoms.

Use Diclofenac as directed by your doctor!

Take Diclofenac by mouth. It may be taken with food if it upsets your stomach. Taking it with food may not lower the risk of stomach or bowel problems (eg, bleeding, ulcers). Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if you have persistent stomach upset.

Take Diclofenac with a full glass of water (8 oz/240 mL) as directed by your doctor.

If you miss a dose of Diclofenac, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Diclofenac.

Store Diclofenac at 77 degrees F (25 degrees C). Brief storage at temperatures between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C) is permitted. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Diclofenac out of the reach of children and away from pets.

Do NOT use Diclofenac if:

you are allergic to any ingredient in Diclofenac or to bovine (cow) protein

you have had a severe allergic reaction (eg, severe rash, hives, trouble breathing, growths in the nose, dizziness) to aspirin or an NSAID (eg, ibuprofen, celecoxib)

you have recently had or will be having bypass heart surgery

you have severe kidney problems

you are in the last 3 months of pregnancy.

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if this applies to you.

Some medical conditions may interact with Diclofenac. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding

if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement

if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances

if you have a history of kidney or liver problems, diabetes, or stomach or bowel problems (eg, bleeding, perforation, ulcers)

if you have a history of swelling or fluid buildup, asthma, growths in the nose (nasal polyps), or mouth inflammation

if you have high blood pressure, blood disorders (eg, porphyria), bleeding or clotting problems, heart problems (eg, heart failure), or blood vessel disease, or if you are at risk for any of these diseases

if you have poor health, dehydration or low fluid volume, or low blood sodium levels, you smoke, drink alcohol, or have a history of alcohol abuse

if you are taking an antibiotic or an anti-seizure medicine. The risk of liver problems may be increased with some of these medicines.

Some medicines may interact with Diclofenac. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Anticoagulants (eg, warfarin), aspirin, clopidogrel, corticosteroids (eg, prednisone), heparin and other blood thinners (eg, dalteparin), or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (eg, fluoxetine) because the risk of stomach bleeding may be increased

Acetaminophen because the risk of liver problems may be increased

Probenecid because it may increase the risk of Diclofenac's side effects

Cyclosporine, lithium, metformin, methotrexate, oral NSAIDs (eg, ibuprofen), or quinolones (eg, ciprofloxacin) because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Diclofenac

Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (eg, enalapril) or diuretics (eg, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide) because their effectiveness may be decreased by Diclofenac.

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Diclofenac may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

Important safety information:

Diclofenac may cause dizziness or drowsiness. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Diclofenac with caution. Do not drive or perform other possible unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it.

Serious stomach ulcers or bleeding can occur with the use of Diclofenac. Taking it in high doses, for a long time, smoking, or drinking alcohol increases the risk of these side effects. Taking Diclofenac with food will NOT reduce the risk of these effects. If you have severe stomach or back pain; black, tarry stools; vomit that looks like blood or coffee grounds; or unusual weight gain or swelling, contact your doctor or emergency room right away.

Do NOT take more than the recommended dose or use for longer than prescribed without checking with your doctor.

Diclofenac is an NSAID. Before you start any new medicine, check the label to see if it has an NSAID (eg, ibuprofen) in it too. If it does or if you are not sure, check with your doctor or pharmacist.

Do not take aspirin while you are using Diclofenac unless your doctor tells you to.

Check with your doctor or pharmacist before you take acetaminophen while you are taking Diclofenac. The risk of liver problems may be increased.

Do not switch between different forms of Diclofenac (eg, enteric-coated tablets, immediate-release tablets, capsules) unless your doctor tells you to. They may not provide the same amount of medicine to your body.

Lab tests, including kidney function, liver function, blood electrolyte levels, complete blood cell counts, and blood pressure, may be performed while you use Diclofenac. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments.

Use Diclofenac with caution in the elderly; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially stomach bleeding and kidney problems.

Diclofenac should be used with extreme caution in children; safety and effectiveness in children have not been confirmed.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Diclofenac may cause harm to the fetus. Do not use it during the last 3 months of pregnancy. If you think you may be pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Diclofenac while you are pregnant. It is not known if Diclofenac is found in breast milk. Do not breastfeed while taking Diclofenac.

Otreon, Otreon

Otreon

Otreon - General Information

Otreon is an oral third generation cephalosporin antibiotic. It is active against most Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. It is commonly used to treat acute otitis media, pharyngitis, and sinusitis.

Pharmacology of Otreon

Otreon is an oral third generation cephalosporin antibiotic. It is active against most Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. Notable exceptions include Pseudomonas aeruginosa . Enterococcus . and Bacteroides fragilis .

Additional information about Otreon

Otreon Indication: For the treatment of patients with mild to moderate infections caused by susceptible strains of the designated microorganisms. Mechanism Of Action: Otreon is active against a wide spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Otreon is stable in the presence of beta-lactamase enzymes. As a result, many organisms resistant to penicillins and cephalosporins, due to their production of beta-lactamase, may be susceptible to cefpodoxime. Otreon is inactivated by certain extended spectrum beta-lactamases. The bactericidal activity of cefpodoxime results from its inhibition of cell wall synthesis. Drug Interactions: Not Available Food Interactions: Take on empty stomach: 1 hour before or 2 hours after meals. Generic Name: Cefpodoxime Synonyms: Cefpodoxime proxetil; CPDX-PR Drug Category: Cephalosporins; Antibacterial Agents Drug Type: Small Molecule; Approved Other Brand Names containing Cefpodoxime: Vantin; Banan; Doxef; Orelox; Otreon; Podomexef; Absorption: Cefpodoxime proxetil is a prodrug that is absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and de-esterified to its active metabolite, cefpodoxime. Following oral administration of 100 mg of cefpodoxime proxetil to fasting subjects, approximately 50% of the administered cefpodoxime dose was absorbed systemically. Toxicity (Overdose): Not Available Protein Binding: 22 to 33% in serum and from 21 to 29% in plasma. Biotransformation: Not Available Half Life: 2.09 to 2.84 hours Dosage Forms of Otreon: Tablet, film coated Oral Granule, for suspension Oral Chemical IUPAC Name: (6R,7R)-7-[[(2Z)-2-(2-amino-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)-2-methoxyiminoacetyl]amino]-3-(methoxymethyl)-8-oxo-5-thia-1-azabicyclo[4.2.0]oct-2-ene-2-carboxylic acid Chemical Formula: C15H17N5O6S2 Cefpodoxime on Wikipedia: http://en. wikipedia. org/wiki/Cefpodoxime Organisms Affected: Enteric bacteria and other eubacteria

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