Stop Blushing - With Medicines - The Blushers Manual, Lopranol


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Stop blushing - With medicines

Recommended medicines Here is a list of medicines that are used for treating facial blushing and social phobia. Always consult your doctor before using any medicine. The medical cures for facial blushing/social phobia can be divided into three categories.

1.) Anxiolytic - (Benzodiazepines.) A drug used in the treatment of anxiety and muscle spasms. Should not be used by people with a drinking problem. May help persons with social phobia to talk in front of a group of people. Benzodiazepines slow down the nervous system. They should not be taken to overcome the stress of everyday life. They may be habit-forming, causing mental or physical dependence. Valium, Xanax, Lorazepam and other benzodiazapine medications can be very effective for controlling the anxiety that results in facial blushing.

2.) Adrenergic Beta Blocker - Beta-Adrenergic Blockers or “Beta Blockers” are a family of drugs used to treat high blood pressure, angina, heart arrhythmia, tremors, alcohol withdrawal, glaucoma, and other conditions. They are also used to prevent migraine headaches, stage fright, and second heart attacks. Beta blockers help the heart rate from racing and can reduce anxiety associated with public speaking.

3.) Antidepressant medicine - This category work for people with social phobia and depression. The time of treatment should be long and the initial dose should be low. Moklobemid treatment (marketed under the names Moklobemid and Aurorix are helpful to help the patient to brake his/hers social isolation. SSRI's (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) such as Paxil, Zoloft and Prozac can be helpful to reduce anxiety that causes the flushing.

The first name after the number (in the list below) is the generic name. Names with the ® symbol are the trade name of the drugs.

1.) Anxiolytic (Benzodiazepines.) Most medicines in this category are highly addictive, don't use daily. Alprazolam (Xanax®) Bromazepam (Lexotan®) Chlordiazepoxide (Librium®) Clonazepam (Klonopin®) Clorazepate (Tranxene®) Diazepam (Valium®, Xanax®) Estazolam (ProSom®) Flunitrazepam (RoHypnol®)

2.) Adrenergic Beta Blocker Acebutalol (Sectral®) Atenolol (Atenolol®,Tenormin®) Bisoprolol (Emcor®, Monocor®) Carvedilol (Carvedilol®,Eucardic®) Celiprolol (Celectol®) Clonidine (Catapresan®) Metoprolol (Betaloc®, Lopresor®) Oxprenolol (Slow-Trasicor®, Trasicor®) Propranolol (Adrexan®, Angilol®, Apo-Propranolol®, Avlocardyl®, Bedranol®, Betachron ER®, Betadur®, Cardinal®, Detensol®, Hemipralon®, Inderal®, Lopranol®, Novopranol®, Propranololum®, Syprol®) Sotalol (Beta-Cardone®, Sotacor®) ZOK (metoprolol CR/XL) (Seloken®

3.) Antidepressant Medicine Moklobemid (Aurorix®) Paroxetin (Seroxat®, Paxil®) Escitalopram (Cipralx®) Venlafaxine (Effexor®) Sertraline (Zoloft®) Clomipramine (Ofepramin®) Moclobemide (Aurorix®) Clomipramine (Anafranil®) Fluvoxamine (Luvox®) Fluoxetine (Prozac®) Citalopram (Celexa®)

Recommendations I asked two doctors for a general recommendations and I was suggested to take Paxil 20 mg/day Zoloft 50 mg/day, and by the other doctor only Paxil. I was also told that Paxil should be taken at least for some months maybe 6-12 months depending on the symptoms. Some people take 50 mg of Atenolol, and 5 mg of Xanax before a performance situation. (Warning don’t take Xanax or any other benzodiazepines regularly because it’s highly addictive.) Remember that medicines are very individual, for one person Paxil may work, but for some other person Efexor makes a better job and so on.

A study of Atenolol and Nardil (Phenelzine) in social phobia A patient should be told that the role of medication is to alleviate their social or performance anxiety in social situations. Increasing exposure to such situations is therefore crucial to overcoming their condition. Seventy-four patients meeting DSM-III criteria for social phobia completed 4 or more weeks of double-blind, randomized treatment with the monoamine oxidase inhibitor phenelzine, the cardioselective beta-adrenergic blocker Atenolol, or placebo.

Sixty-four percent of the patients on phenelzine demonstrated moderate or marked improvement, compared to 30 percent on Atenolol and 23 percent on placebo. Phenelzine was significantly more effective than Atenolol or placebo, whereas the efficacy of Atenolol and placebo did not differ significantly. Patients were also prospectively divided into generalized and discrete subtypes of social phobia. Phenelzine appeared to be a particularly effective treatment for the generalized form of social phobia. Atenolol may be useful for discrete forms of social phobia such as performance anxiety.